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Thread: Point of aim test

  1. #1
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    I was just wondering how many of you test/care about the point of aim of a new handgun?

    In the case that you have no idea what I'm talking about, I'll explain it. Take out your gun, UNLOAD IT, point it at an object on the wall/ceiling/floor, now close your eyes and move the weapon around a little bit and get a good point of aim (just naturally point the weapon) in the general area of the object you were pointing at, now open your eyes and notice how much movement is required to have a proper sight alignment. It doesn't matter if your on target or not, just properly line up the sights and remember how much you have to move the weapon.

    Now do the same test with another handgun of a different size and style, I'm almost certain that it'll be different.

    In my opinion, the more natural the point of aim is, the inherently more accurate the weapon will be. That's my opinion anyway.

  2. #2
    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Point of aim as you describe it is an ergonomics matter I look at in any firearm before purchasing it. I know exactly how my primary carry pistols sit in my hand when they are perfectly aligned for point shooting. I have not purchased handguns before that didn't line up naturally in my hand.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

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    Well, I'm glad you explained it.

    I had pictures of asking the counterman for test ammo. Bullet holes in showroom walls? I honestly had no idea where you were goingwith it. Some backwoods VA custom with which I was unfamiliar? I didn't know.


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  4. #4
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    XS Big Dot Sights for the win!

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    POI -- "point of aim" . . . It's a shotgunning term. You look at the target (skeet/trap) point the gun at the target and shoot. The gun should shoot where you're looking -- if it fits.

    POI in a handgun . . . Look at the target, raise the gun, point and shoot. You should be able to hit the 9" pie plate at 20 feet, 7 yds. The 9" pie plate is a good practice target -- center of mass size, and cheap, also, white paper and easy to see.

    LEO and military/Coast Guard who carry a side arm practice "point shooting" at 7 yds or 20 feet. This is the nominal range of most defense shootings. You tell yourself that you're going to line up the sights, but when the pressure is on, you need to be able to point, shoot and hit the pie plate at 20 feet.




  6. #6
    Regular Member IanB's Avatar
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    Bravo_Sierra wrote:
    XS Big Dot Sights for the win!
    +1

  7. #7
    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    POI = point of impact
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

  8. #8
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    In addition to grip shape etc. familiarity may play a role.

  9. #9
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    Yep, they taught us that in the Marine Corps. You line up your sights in a stable position and comfortable grip, close your eyes and keep them closed, take a deep breath and relax, then open your eyes and just look at your sights, but don't move. If they're still aligned, you're in a good shooting position, or in the case of a handgun, you have a good grip.

    I noticed that I was shooting low with my SW99 at the range, so I took the time to analyze my grip. My natural point of aim was low, i.e. my front sight was slightly lower than my rear sights. I switched my medium backstrap out with the large one, and that pushed the front sight up just enough to line up with the back sight perfectly.

  10. #10
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    Could yinz say a little more on the big dots please, something i have wanted to check out thank you in ad''vance. Mtn JACK

  11. #11
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    Does this not also have something to do with how you naturally point your finger?

    I note that the pad of myright index finger naturally covers the back of the takedown pin, in a 1911, and the screw holding on the right half of the revolver frame, over the trigger, in most revolvers I have.

    Therefore, if I naturally index my finger when drawing the weapon and point it, before placing my finger on the trigger, I should be pretty nearly lined up on my target that I've 'pointed' at, before I bring my sights into play.

    I don't know is this is a universal, or just something that I've unconsciously made a habit, but I use a Blackhawk Serpa II holster with my 1911, and when I draw, my index finger is always on that lever before I draw.

    Any supporting comments out there?



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