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Thread: Weapons in Bars

  1. #1
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    I have noticed an interesting observation regarding weapons in bars. If you look at the "misconduct involving weapons" in title 13, throughout the statute it uses the term "deadly weapon" instead of firearm which would include firearms and other deadly weapons. However, the bar prohibition in title 4 under "unlawful acts" only uses the term "firearms." Most bars are not posted because firearms are already prohibited by law so they don't need a "no guns" sign. Legally, there is nothing stopping you from bringing in large knives, tasers, batons, and other weapons that are not firearms. If it isn't posted and the bar staff don't know about it, you are legal. If you like to go to the clubs but don't like feeling naked without your gun, strap on a taser or a good-size fixed-blade knife.

  2. #2
    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    If there's a sign back of the bar that reads: 'No Weapons'... That's the policy.

  3. #3
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    You obviously missed the entire point. Most bars are not posted because state law already prohibits firearms so bars don't need to put a "no guns" sign. I've been to dozens of bars and have never seen any of them posted. As long as it isn't posted, you can bring non-firearm weapons inside but in this case I would recommend carrying concealed to avoid being asked to leave. Most people believe that you cannot bring weapons in bars per state statute, but the statute only prohibits guns and nothing else.

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    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    If the owner/management has a 'No Weapons' policy... then that's what it is. I suppose if ya had a folding knife (like a Buck hunter) inna case on yer belt... nobody'd get excited, but there's other joints where they don't allow anything sharp 'n pointy at all. 'Leave it in yer vehicle 'cause they don't keep 'em for ya either. 'Not really a big deal... Not to me anyway.

  5. #5
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    The way I look at it is, what they don't know I have won't hurt them. Plus I have only been in 2 bars this year, something bout driving after drinking there and laws I despise. Best done at home.

  6. #6
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    You still don't seem to be getting it, so I'll spell it out. You have state law and you have internal policy. State law prohibits firearms in bars. A bar without any internal weapons policy means that you can bring any non-firearm weapon in the bar, concealed or open and subject to CCW permit laws. A bar that has an internal no-weapons policy will come in two forms: posted or non-posted. Posted means there is a sign in a conspicuous place detailing what is not allowed on the property. The sign may read "No Weapons Permitted" and have symbols of guns, knives, and clubs each surrounded by a red circle with a slash through it. Violating such internal policy would not result in a weapons charge from the authorities but could be considered trespassing. Violating such policy would give the management the right to eject you from the property and if you refused to leave, you could be arrested for trespassing. A non-posted no-weapons policy means that there are no signs posted prohibiting weapons but that the bar won't allow them anyway. A bar can enforce this policy one of two ways. The first is by having bouncers do pat-down or other searches upon entering the property to look for concealed weapons. The bouncers or other employees or managmenent will inform you verbally that weapons are not allowed. The second way this would be enforced is if you open-carried and a staff member or management approached you and verbally asked you to disarm or leave the property. Since this is an internal policy and not a state law, you are not breaking the law by carrying weapons until a "reasonable request" has been made for you to disarm. That reasonable request will either be a posted and obvious sign or a staff member or management verbally telling you. Until that reasonable request is made, you are not breaking any laws.

    My point was that most bars are not posted so you aren't doing anything illegal until they verbally tell you "no weapons." That is why it is advisable that if you want protection while dining out or drinking (responsibly), you should carry all the non-firearm weapons you want but keep them concealed to avoid being given that "reasonable request." As long as you do that, you are legal. I'm not going to explain this further as this clearly should be simple enough to understand.



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    dreamcro wrote:
    The way I look at it is, what they don't know I have won't hurt them. Plus I have only been in 2 bars this year, something bout driving after drinking there and laws I despise. Best done at home.
    Same way I look at it.

  8. #8
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    Bringing a firearm in a bar is a class 2 misdemeanor. Personally, I think it is better to risk a small charge like that than risk being a "sitting duck" unable to do anything when some deranged individual walks in with a shotgun and starts blasting everyone away.



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