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Thread: Concealing on a motorcycle without a CCW

  1. #1
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    As soon as I got to work this morning I realized I had left at home my wallet with my DL, insurance card, registration, and my biggest concern, my CCW (I work in Denver, I so OC is not an option). The way I understand Colorado's laws, I can still legally conceal while on or in the immediate vicinity of my bike without a CCW. Is this correct?

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    Regular Member reefteach's Avatar
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    You do not need a license to conceal while operating your mororvehicle in Colorado.

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    reefteach wrote:
    You do not need a license to conceal while operating your mororvehicle in Colorado.
    Of course, its that walk from the parking lot into the 7-Eleven for that enroute coffee that is the problem, or into work.
    I'll make you an offer: I will argue and fight for all of your rights, if you will do the same for me. That is the only way freedom can work. We have to respect all rights, all the time--and strive to win the rights of the other guy as much as for ourselves.

    If I am equal to another, how can I legitimately govern him without his express individual consent?

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    Citizen wrote:
    Of course, its that walk from the parking lot into the 7-Eleven for that enroute coffee that is the problem, or into work.
    Yes, I was breaking the law there, but the chances of running into an officer in either place was slim and snowball. I was more worried about getting pulled over, but it sounds like I should have been legal gun-wise. I have a feeling that I would have spent some time trying to get my gun back if I'd been pulled over, what with the lack of ID, driver license, proof of insurance, registration and what-not.

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    FogRider wrote:
    Citizen wrote:
    Of course, its that walk from the parking lot into the 7-Eleven for that enroute coffee that is the problem, or into work.
    Yes, I was breaking the law there, but the chances of running into an officer in either place was slim and snowball. I was more worried about getting pulled over, but it sounds like I should have been legal gun-wise. I have a feeling that I would have spent some time trying to get my gun back if I'd been pulled over, what with the lack of ID, driver license, proof of insurance, registration and what-not.
    IIRC, when I lived in England you did not have to have your drivers license with you or insurance. If you were pulled over and didn't have it the officer could request you bring it to the local station later and show it. Or not. The paper isn't what authorizes you to drive. It's just evidence that you're permitted to. How's that for enlightened policy?

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    Regular Member Anubis's Avatar
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    If you have a permit but forget to carry it, it's not a majorcrime.

    CRS 18-12-204(2)(a)Permit contents-validity-carrying requirements.

    A permittee, in compliance with the terms of a permit, may carry a concealed handgun as allowed by state law. The permittee shall carry the permit, together with valid photo identification, at all times during which the permittee is in actual possession of a concealed handgun and shall produce both documents upon demand by a law enforcement officer. Failure to produce a permit upon demand by a law enforcement officer raises a rebuttable presumption that the person does not have a permit. Failure to carry and produce a permit and valid photo identification upon demand as required in this subsection (2) is a class 1 petty offense. A charge of failure to carry and produce a permit and valid photo identification upon demand pursuant to this subsection (2) shall be dismissed by the court if, at or before the permittee's scheduled court appearance, the permittee exhibits to the court a valid permit and valid photo identification, both of which were issued to the permittee prior to the date on which the permittee was charged with failure to carry and produce a permit and valid photo identification upon demand.

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    akpoff wrote:
    IIRC, when I lived in England you did not have to have your drivers license with you or insurance. If you were pulled over and didn't have it the officer could request you bring it to the local station later and show it. Or not. The paper isn't what authorizes you to drive. It's just evidence that you're permitted to. How's that for enlightened policy?
    That's actually how it usually works here as well, if you are missing the paperwork you get a fine, if you can bring everything in to court it gets dropped. There may not have been any major problems, I just had a bad feeling about the possible outcomes. I was pulled over in Denver, after all.

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