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Thread: Floridian trading in Guns for Gas Cards

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    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/commu...,2422912.story

    KISSIMMEE - Bob Hayden's Depression-era .22-caliber rifle was an old friend he used to hunt squirrels, rabbits and crows seven decades ago, when a box of 50 short shells cost 14 cents -- and it took a while to save the money. But on Thursday, Hayden, 86, handed the gun, which he received as a prize for selling garden seeds and Cloverine salve, to Osceola County deputy sheriffs. He left with a $50 gasoline gift card and peace of mind from knowing that he had disposed of the weapon safely at a time when shooting deaths are on the rise in Central Florida.

    Hayden, of Kissimmee, was one of hundreds of Central Floridians who participated in the annual Kicks for Guns event, this year at three locations: the Florida Citrus Bowl, Central Florida Fairgrounds and Primera Iglesia Cristiana in Osceola. In all, 443 firearms, from sawed-off shotguns to Saturday-night specials, were relinquished. Law officers plan to destroy them. Last year, 310 guns were turned in, but only the Orange County Sheriff's Office and Orlando police participated. I think there's no question that taking 443 guns off the street makes for a safer community for all of us," said Barb Bergin, law-enforcement coordinator for Crimeline, which organizes the event. "You've got to know that if one gun is off the street, it may mean one less robbery, one less person hurt." Officers and deputies asked no questions.

    All gun owners had to do was show up, hand over their weapons and accept a reward that ranged from gas or grocery cards to sneakers, depending on the agency. BB guns were accepted, but not all agencies compensated people for them Debbie Collins, 51, of Orlando, walked away from the Citrus Bowl with a pair of child's shoes in exchange for a handgun she said belonged to a relative. With school starting Monday and five children to clothe, "It was a good way to get some kids' sneakers," Collins said. Kicks for Guns was created 10 years ago by WTKS radio host Russ Rollins, now of Monsters in the Morning, who was concerned about increasing gun use among youth. The first exchange gave sneakers -- "kicks" -- for guns "because, at the time, kids were beating each other up and killing each other for Nikes and Reeboks," Rollins said. In the parking lot at Primera Iglesia Cristiana, drivers pulled up and didn't even have to get out of their cars.

    A deputy walked up and greeted them, examined their guns, handed out the gas cards and wished them a good day. The whole process took about three minutes per person. "I'm not much into tennis shoes, but I said with the price of gas, this is a good, fair trade," said one man who would not give his name. Several people said they were worried about children finding the weapons at home and hurting themselves. Others, such as Jonathan Race, 43, of St. Cloud, feared having their guns stolen during a burglary.

    I've been waiting for an excuse to get rid of it," said Race, who turned in an old .22-caliber rifle that he last used two decades ago. Retiree Harry Marker, of Poinciana, had a practical reason for unloading his .22 automatic: He carries a 9 mm pistol now. "If I have to shoot somebody with a .22, it ain't gonna do too much," said Marker, 61, who dropped off the gun with his 11-year-old granddaughter in the passenger seat. "I carry a bigger one if I'm with my family."

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    yeahYeah wrote:
    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/commu...,2422912.story

    KISSIMMEE - Bob Hayden's Depression-era .22-caliber rifle was an old friend he used to hunt squirrels, rabbits and crows seven decades ago, when a box of 50 short shells cost 14 cents -- and it took a while to save the money. But on Thursday, Hayden, 86, handed the gun, which he received as a prize for selling garden seeds and Cloverine salve, to Osceola County deputy sheriffs. He left with a $50 gasoline gift card and peace of mind from knowing that he had disposed of the weapon safely at a time when shooting deaths are on the rise in Central Florida.


    LOL Yea, that's the best time to give up all your weapons. Good thing he got rid of that gun. It might have gone crazy one night and shot him. He won't have to worry about being the victim of an out of control gun now. You really gotta love when people refer to inanimate objects like they're livingcrack heads.

    Idiots, all of them. Got a good laugh at the ending though. At least someone has a brain.

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    soon the govt. will be offering tax breaks, govt. cheese and carbon credits for guns

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    Debbie Collins, 51, of Orlando, walked away from the Citrus Bowl with a pair of child's shoes in exchange for a handgun she said belonged to a relative.
    And does the relative know that Debbie Collins, 51, of Orlando, stole their handgun?

    I know that some folks have a junker that they will not sell or otherwise give away because it is unsafe, but a Depression-era .22-short rifle that was earned by selling seeds and Cloverine Salve to folks who did not have any spare cash is just heartbreaking. If Bob Haydenhad a child or grandchildhe could havepassed that on too, he surely cheated them out of more than just a .22 rifle.

    The whole thing is just sad.

    stay safe.

    skidmark
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

    "No matter how much contempt you have for the media in all this, you don't have enough"
    ----Allahpundit

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    i have a depression era .22 bolt action (mossberg 25a). i would never give it up. it will one day be handed down to my kids.

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    yeahYeah wrote:
    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/commu...,2422912.story

    "I'm not much into tennis shoes, but I said with the price of gas, this is a good, fair trade," said one man who would not give his name.
    :what::what::what:So, you think it's a good, fair trade to get $50 in gas by giving them a gun that may retail for10 or even 15 times as much, and would get 5 to 10 times the cost of the gas card on consignment?

    And that Depression-era .22; that'll be a curio in another decade or so. Why don't you will it to a grandson, or a granddaughter? If you're really worried about it being stolen, and don't feel anyone would want it, then SELL IT.

    This makes me sick; in Weatherford, Texas a sheriff is trying to return a WWII-era Colt 1911A1 to its rightful owner, while in Florida they're melting down even older firearms. Sickening.



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    "You've got to know that if one gun is off the street, it may mean one less robbery, one less person hurt."
    Or it may mean another mass killing not prevented by an LAC

    Officers and deputies asked no questions.
    Including filling-out the BATFEMATSAICE 4473

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    I first went to the gun range at the ripe old age of 5. until I got my first rifle, a Remington .22 that I got when I was ten, shooting wasn't thrilling for me, but it held my interest. once I had a rifle of my own, though, you couldn't keep me off the range. a good day at the range for me is exactly that, a day. 500 rounds of .223 at least, plus about 100 of pistol and a round of 5-stand shotgun. (The Indian River County Range is the best range ever!) I haven't used that little .22 in years, but my grandpa gifted it to my mother when she turned ten, and it is going to my son when he turns ten. Guess I'd better get some time on that thing before he gets it, he's already showing an interest in daddy's guns! there's no way I would trade any single one of my firearms for gas, shoes or anything except another, bigger, better gun. I'd rather walk.

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    I am so very glad that my wife & I decided to stay in Colorado, andnot move back to Florida once I'm out of the Army. That State is rapidly following California's example, and their existing firearms laws are retarded.

    Anytime I hear of a gun-exchange or turn-in program, I'm sickened just thinking of all the perfectly good, possibly collectible/antique, and valuable firearms that'll just be destroyed.... all in the name of high-horse, ignorant & inane ethics.

    People who are willing to disregard history and dispose of valuable, importanttools (possiblyheirlooms) for a cheap pair of made-in-China sneakers or $50-worth of gas, and believe that destroyingan antique .22 rifle will help stop crime have lost touch with reality.... They probably don't give a damn about being an American, likely believe we're in a recession, and swallow all the global warming &go-green garbage fed them by the mass-media & HusseinObama.

    I wish more citizens realized that owning a firearm isn't just having a gun; it's aboutbeing aware of andcherishing the rights that our forebears gave their lives defending, retaining the ability to defend oneself & one's family against criminals & corrupt government, and having the means to obtain food if at some point supermarkets cease to exist.

    And besides, that cheap pair of sneakers & $50 gas card will probably both last only a week.

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    I should hold one of the Kick for guns drives at my house, and hand out bottled water. i will make good use of the guns...

    But seriously. When they said something about getting guns off the streets, and it could save lives and blah blah blah. They are making responsible gun owners sound like criminals.

    If some have a fear of someone coming in their house and taking the gun then they need to place their gun in a secure area of the house, where the guns will not be found. All my pistolsare insecure hidden places in my house, to find them one would have to look all day for it, but if I need one it will take only seconds.

    These people are crazy. Really they are, one day they may wish they had their gun when a BG runs in their house at night.

    This just goes to show how the powers that be are painting a bad picture of guns in the mind of the American people.

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