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Thread: NRA Instructor Course in Richmond

  1. #1
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    I'm looking to get my NRA instructor certification, mainly to be a BSA merit badge counselor for the rifle and shotgun shooting badges.

    I can't find a course in Richmond for the NRA instructor certification on the NRA search site. Does anyone know of anyone (preferably on the north side) that offers the instructor course?

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
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    Good luck on finding someone. I started several years ago trying find one within fifty miles with no luck. The ones I found wanted a arm and a leg just for me to offer free gun classes for my neighborhood. I don't mind paying a nominal fee, because I don't plan on charging for the course I teach. I do it for the love of the subject, not the love of money.

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    Hmm. There was a guy in Lakeside that offered a class for $300, but he needed 10 people to hold it and I was the only one interested.

    Thanks for the info, I'll keep looking.
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    http://www.nrahq.org/education/train...VA&Type=IT

    IWLA in Centreville VA does them 2 times a year on a regular basis. Good group of people.



    [*][size=+0]Centreville - Wednesday, March 25, 2009, Arlington-Fairfax Chapter, Inc., $200
    Pamela Meara, 703-266-2235. , kptjmeara@gmail.com
    Class types: Basic Rifle,Instructor Training

    Course Notes:
    Basic Instructor Training March 25, 26, 27; 1900 to 2200 Rifle Discipline March 28, 29; 0800 to 1700

    [*][size=+0]Centreville - Wednesday, April 22, 2009, Arlington-Fairfax Chapter, Inc., $200
    Pamela Meara, 703-266-2235. , kptjmeara@gmail.com
    Class types: Basic Shotgun,Instructor Training
    Michael Lucas does them in PORTSMOUTH, heres a pistol course but If you call him he might have one coming up for BSA outside of his regular training schedule.

    [*][size=+0]Portsmouth - Sunday, October 12, 2008, 3300 Tyre Neck Road Suite G, $200
    Michael Lucas, 757.271.9143. , michael09@cox.net
    Class types: Basic Pistol,Instructor Training Mikes a good guy and a huge BSA guy.

    I'm doing one for Pistol in NOV. Your also about the 10 person today who I've seen in VA hasaskingfor RIFLE/ Shotgun certifications for the exact reason. Therefore I'm thinking about doing a Rifle Course in December. Haven't posted it yet, but still considering doing one if you want to drive up to NOVA.

    NOVA - Saturday, November 01, 2008, Fairfax, $250
    Andy Lander, 703 267 1428. , alander@NRAHQ.org
    Class types: Basic Pistol,First Steps Pistol,Instructor Training


    Just a note regarding the comment on cost. NRA materials for an individaul instructor run about $25-$30 plus other costs such as renting a range, classroom, etc....plus to train somebody elses as a rifle instructor takes 20 hours from start to finish for a brand new person. Shotgun is 17 hours but still its along time to do this.

    FYI once you get a certification for one of the following shooting disciplins i.e.RIfle, Pistol, Shotgun....etc... You can homestudy the Range SafetyOfficer (alsorequired by BSA).


    I also did a search for NRA Training Counselors (Instructor Trainers)in the Richmond area and found a few which if you send me an email I can send you their contact information. You have to shop your self to find their what they charge and if you and them are compatible.

  5. #5
    Regular Member ProShooter's Avatar
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    While the last thing that I as a business owner wants is more competition , I can honestly recommend the NOVA class that Andy Lander does. Andy is the man.

    We've been asked a few times about running an instructor school but again I'm undecided about training my possible competition.

    Jim

    James Reynolds

    NRA Certified Firearms Instructor - Pistol, Shotgun, Home Firearms Safety, Refuse To Be A Victim
    Concealed Firearms Instructor for Virginia, Florida & Utah permits.
    NRA Certified Chief Range Safety Officer
    Sabre Red Pepper Spray Instructor
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    Instructor Bio - http://proactiveshooters.com/about-us/

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    Proshooter, I can understand the hesitation to train the competition...but trust me, I'm only looking to do this for the BSA in my spare time and, didn't you say you needed a part time instructor anyway???

    robb99, thanks for the info. I saw the NOVA classes, but was trying to find one closer if possible. I appreciate the list, and if nothing pans out down here, I'll probably have to make the trip.

    I'm not too concerned about cost, I was ready and willing to pony up 300 for the local course, but if I can get one in NOVA for 200, that will help pay for the gas to get there and back...maybe.
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    Bnkrazy,

    I understand your motive. However, the credentials once acheived can be used to not only teach BSA but can also be used to teach people and fulfill the training requirements for Concealed Handgun Permits in the state of VA. Once you become an NRA instructor and you give a 13 year old boyscouter a Rifle or Shotgun course, and issue that individual a course completion certificate. The way VA law is currently that Boyscouter can take that certificate (once hes 21) and use his Rifle or Shotgun certificate in the commonwealth of Virginia To obtain his carry permit.

    Believe me I'm a HUGE advocate of BSA and their training programs and do training with BSA all over the country I know some of the leadership at the top personally and their hearts are made of SOLID GOLD, 2 years agoI diddo a freeRifle and shotgun Instructor courseup here inNOVA at one of the local troops meeting locations fortroops in the Fairfax area. I also did reach into my own pocket and ended up coming out payingsome money for theircertification. I'm not harping about that but I would rather not make it a reoccuring thing, I did do it and and am happyI helped out the local counsels. However, most peoplewould rather not reach into their own pockets to train others. Which in itself is understandable.

    PS See you at the JAMBOREE!!!!!

    PSS I emailed you the Training List check your email.


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    bnkrazy wrote:
    Proshooter, I can understand the hesitation to train the competition...but trust me, I'm only looking to do this for the BSA in my spare time and, didn't you say you needed a part time instructor anyway???

    robb99, thanks for the info. I saw the NOVA classes, but was trying to find one closer if possible. I appreciate the list, and if nothing pans out down here, I'll probably have to make the trip.

    I'm not too concerned about cost, I was ready and willing to pony up 300 for the local course, but if I can get one in NOVA for 200, that will help pay for the gas to get there and back...maybe.
    I may have to think about it again. We are looking for an instructor.

    There's a nice hotel that I can recommend real close to the class and its done at NRA headquarters. Dont miss the museum! I may be wrong but I believe that there was some caveat to taking the instructors course, i.e. having some verifiable background dealing with firearms....
    James Reynolds

    NRA Certified Firearms Instructor - Pistol, Shotgun, Home Firearms Safety, Refuse To Be A Victim
    Concealed Firearms Instructor for Virginia, Florida & Utah permits.
    NRA Certified Chief Range Safety Officer
    Sabre Red Pepper Spray Instructor
    Glock Certified Armorer
    Instructor Bio - http://proactiveshooters.com/about-us/

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    ProShooter wrote
    I may be wrong but I believe that there was some caveat to taking the instructors course, i.e. having some verifiable background dealing with firearms....
    I would hope not. Not that having some sort of professional background dealing with firearms is a bad thing, but I don't see where that should be a requirement.

    I don't have any "professional" experience with firearms, I've just been around them all my life and love introducing people to the sport. I've introduced about 20 individuals to the sport this year alone. They've been all along the spectrum of gun-friendliness, from "I'm interested but I don't know where to start" types to "I'll never touch one of those scary guns" types. All have had an enjoyable and safe time, and most have mentioned that I'd make a good instructor.

    I don't have any desire at this point to change careers, but I would like to a least get some credentials to help alleviate some of the uncertainty some folks have. As mentioned, I would like to help out the BSA.
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    The requirements are that you have a background in firearms. That doesn't mean you have to have been a police officer, or a Navy Seal. From what you stated your background would meet the criteria. The idea is to teach the basic knowledge, skill, and attitude necessary to own and operate _____<-insert type of firearm here.

    If NRA instructors only came from professional shooting backgrounds then there would not be a boyscout merit badge program at all.

    Some of the best trainers I know never where military or professional police officers. Just like some of the best shooters where never a Police Officer or former Military and some where. Just like some of the most painful courses I've sat in on where from guys in the military or Police Officers and vice versa to Civilians. I don't believe in that whole well I was X therefore I'm qualified to do this.....I'm a put your money on the table guy and show me what you got! I'm not trying to stereotype one category of people I'm just saying most people get what they put into it or how they come to the training, and training comes from individuals and how they like or dislike what they are doing not just a credential hanging on the wall, and just cause your taking the wild west shooting academies uber tactical pistoler course for engaging unwanted rattlesnakes, your still taking a course from an individual instructor

    If you come with the know it all attitude (happens a lot) you may not actually learn as much as you could. Even if I don't agree with something in the course I'm going to do it otherwise, why am I paying or using my time to attend the course? The best example I can think of is from one of my mentors who once told me he was at a course for professional development (firearms related) my friend has a tendency to write everything down. In this case he was copying everything the instructor was saying. The instructor asked him on a break if he really liked what he (the instructor) was teaching, my friend said "no in fact I disagree with about 90% of it but I'm putting it in my tool box to be possible used at a later time".

    Some of the high level IPSC shooters come to mind, as well as SASS and olympic shooters.

    Doesn't matter what walk of life you came from in the professional field everybody has a weakness. Trust me if you ever become a instructor trainer in any field you will understand this real quick.

    I actually had a guy come up to me before a Instructor trainer course (which I was teaching) and said. Hey I'm your 1911 guy if you want to know how to shoot a 1911 just let me know! There are ways of dealing with such people, my method was giving him the section on single action revolvers. He had no idea how to operate a S/A gun but since he was military he had no exposure to S/A revolvers, but as an NRA instructor you are expected to know how to operate/use all the platforms in a certain discipline. The point of this was not to embarrass him, but if somebody comes across with the know it all attitude I'm going make for DARN sure they learn something in my class! Nobody knows it all. In fact I learn tons from my students when I'm sitting in class teaching an Instructor level course. The day this ceases to happen is the day I probably no longer am producing a pulse.

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    Thanks for the info. I definitely don't have a know-everything attitude. Recently, I've been assisting a couple of the people I introduced to shooting over the summer select a carry piece. Going over function differences, capacity, aftermarket options, etc. between models has made me do my own research, so I know how much info there is to cram in my head.


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    rob99vmi04 wrote:
    The requirements are that you have a background in firearms. That doesn't mean you have to have been a police officer, or a Navy Seal. From what you stated your background would meet the criteria. The idea is to teach the basic knowledge, skill, and attitude necessary to own and operate _____<-insert type of firearm here.

    If NRA instructors only came from professional shooting backgrounds then there would not be a boyscout merit badge program at all.

    Some of the best trainers I know never where military or professional police officers. Just like some of the best shooters where never a Police Officer or former Military and some where. Just like some of the most painful courses I've sat in on where from guys in the military or Police Officers and vice versa to Civilians. I don't believe in that whole well I was X therefore I'm qualified to do this.....I'm a put your money on the table guy and show me what you got! I'm not trying to stereotype one category of people I'm just saying most people get what they put into it or how they come to the training, and training comes from individuals and how they like or dislike what they are doing not just a credential hanging on the wall, and just cause your taking the wild west shooting academies uber tactical pistoler course for engaging unwanted rattlesnakes, your still taking a course from an individual instructor

    If you come with the know it all attitude (happens a lot) you may not actually learn as much as you could. Even if I don't agree with something in the course I'm going to do it otherwise, why am I paying or using my time to attend the course? The best example I can think of is from one of my mentors who once told me he was at a course for professional development (firearms related) my friend has a tendency to write everything down. In this case he was copying everything the instructor was saying. The instructor asked him on a break if he really liked what he (the instructor) was teaching, my friend said "no in fact I disagree with about 90% of it but I'm putting it in my tool box to be possible used at a later time".

    Some of the high level IPSC shooters come to mind, as well as SASS and olympic shooters.

    Doesn't matter what walk of life you came from in the professional field everybody has a weakness. Trust me if you ever become a instructor trainer in any field you will understand this real quick.

    I actually had a guy come up to me before a Instructor trainer course (which I was teaching) and said. Hey I'm your 1911 guy if you want to know how to shoot a 1911 just let me know! There are ways of dealing with such people, my method was giving him the section on single action revolvers. He had no idea how to operate a S/A gun but since he was military he had no exposure to S/A revolvers, but as an NRA instructor you are expected to know how to operate/use all the platforms in a certain discipline. The point of this was not to embarrass him, but if somebody comes across with the know it all attitude I'm going make for DARN sure they learn something in my class! Nobody knows it all. In fact I learn tons from my students when I'm sitting in class teaching an Instructor level course. The day this ceases to happen is the day I probably no longer am producing a pulse.
    I 100% agree with you Rob, I am military and have had a "Train the Trainer" firearms class. I was amazed at what I hadn't known and how one can compensate for other factors. It's as my FAA Examiner said when I got my Airframe Certificate " Your license is license to learn, your not going to know everything".

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    Infidel wrote:
    rob99vmi04 wrote:
    The requirements are that you have a background in firearms. That doesn't mean you have to have been a police officer, or a Navy Seal. From what you stated your background would meet the criteria. The idea is to teach the basic knowledge, skill, and attitude necessary to own and operate _____<-insert type of firearm here.

    If NRA instructors only came from professional shooting backgrounds then there would not be a boyscout merit badge program at all.

    Some of the best trainers I know never where military or professional police officers. Just like some of the best shooters where never a Police Officer or former Military and some where. Just like some of the most painful courses I've sat in on where from guys in the military or Police Officers and vice versa to Civilians. I don't believe in that whole well I was X therefore I'm qualified to do this.....I'm a put your money on the table guy and show me what you got! I'm not trying to stereotype one category of people I'm just saying most people get what they put into it or how they come to the training, and training comes from individuals and how they like or dislike what they are doing not just a credential hanging on the wall, and just cause your taking the wild west shooting academies uber tactical pistoler course for engaging unwanted rattlesnakes, your still taking a course from an individual instructor

    If you come with the know it all attitude (happens a lot) you may not actually learn as much as you could. Even if I don't agree with something in the course I'm going to do it otherwise, why am I paying or using my time to attend the course? The best example I can think of is from one of my mentors who once told me he was at a course for professional development (firearms related) my friend has a tendency to write everything down. In this case he was copying everything the instructor was saying. The instructor asked him on a break if he really liked what he (the instructor) was teaching, my friend said "no in fact I disagree with about 90% of it but I'm putting it in my tool box to be possible used at a later time".

    Some of the high level IPSC shooters come to mind, as well as SASS and olympic shooters.

    Doesn't matter what walk of life you came from in the professional field everybody has a weakness. Trust me if you ever become a instructor trainer in any field you will understand this real quick.

    I actually had a guy come up to me before a Instructor trainer course (which I was teaching) and said. Hey I'm your 1911 guy if you want to know how to shoot a 1911 just let me know! There are ways of dealing with such people, my method was giving him the section on single action revolvers. He had no idea how to operate a S/A gun but since he was military he had no exposure to S/A revolvers, but as an NRA instructor you are expected to know how to operate/use all the platforms in a certain discipline. The point of this was not to embarrass him, but if somebody comes across with the know it all attitude I'm going make for DARN sure they learn something in my class! Nobody knows it all. In fact I learn tons from my students when I'm sitting in class teaching an Instructor level course. The day this ceases to happen is the day I probably no longer am producing a pulse.
    I 100% agree with you Rob, I am military and have had a "Train the Trainer" firearms class. I was amazed at what I hadn't known and how one can compensate for other factors. It's as my FAA Examiner said when I got my Airframe Certificate " Your license is license to learn, your not going to know everything".

    Excellent statement - you really cant know everything. I'm constantly learning stuff. Last week, someone came to my class with a Skyy brand handgun - never saw one before. Never even heard of the company. I'm constantly learning new stuff every day.


    Now my wife on the other hand....well! She knows EVERYTHING! (or so she says! )
    James Reynolds

    NRA Certified Firearms Instructor - Pistol, Shotgun, Home Firearms Safety, Refuse To Be A Victim
    Concealed Firearms Instructor for Virginia, Florida & Utah permits.
    NRA Certified Chief Range Safety Officer
    Sabre Red Pepper Spray Instructor
    Glock Certified Armorer
    Instructor Bio - http://proactiveshooters.com/about-us/

  14. #14
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    I'd be interseted in a trainer course as well. Let me know what you find. Though I live in Chesapeake, I'm willing to travel up north.

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