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Thread: Anticipatory jerk

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    I took my USP 9mm out and shot it earlier today. Put 120 rounds through it. Finally got to shoot at an actual paper target. Fired 10 rounds at a clean one. Horrible spread, and low left. But its only my third time with a pistol period, first with something I can see where Im missing.
    Tried shooting with both eyes open. I could not sort out the double image.
    I discovered maybe once per mag I would not pull the trigger all the way and jerk my arms downwards, anticiapting a shot. Felt as stupid as it looked. Now that I think about it though, it was definetly the jerk that caused me not to pull the trigger all the way. Any suggestions?

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    Take it slow. I'm not a certified trainer, and I am not a great shot, and I certainly did NOT stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night, but here's what I tell my friends. The recoil will happen. There's no way around it. Its a given. Don't even think about it. Don't try to stop it. It is something that will happen whether you want it to happen or not.So think about what you will do after the recoil. With proper form, it will be easy to be set again. Your hands willbe moved by the recoil, but correct form makes your body like a spring. It will want to come back to neutral.Are you using isometric tension? Correct handgrip? Correct stance? Breathing normally? Concentrating on that frontsight? It will take a bit of time, but when you can answer all these questions with a definite "Yes", your shooting will improve.

    As far as both eyes open, no idea what a good way is. I practiced by aiming with one eye closed, opening it, while still trying "see" the sight picture of looks through the sights with one eye closed. Took some getting used to, comparing the different images you see and figuring out which one is the correct one.

  3. #3
    mdgary
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    colt45ws wrote:
    I took my USP 9mm out and shot it earlier today. Put 120 rounds through it. Finally got to shoot at an actual paper target. Fired 10 rounds at a clean one. Horrible spread, and low left. But its only my third time with a pistol period, first with something I can see where Im missing.
    Tried shooting with both eyes open. I could not sort out the double image.
    I discovered maybe once per mag I would not pull the trigger all the way and jerk my arms downwards, anticiapting a shot. Felt as stupid as it looked. Now that I think about it though, it was definetly the jerk that caused me not to pull the trigger all the way. Any suggestions?
    keep botheyes on the target and Squeeze the trigger rather than "pull" it

    TRY this, Unload your weapon and practice aiming and squeezing the trigger.


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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Have you had any formal handgun training. I suspect not from your post and would strongly recommend such before you ingrain any bad habits.

    You do not indicate where you are located so I cannot give you a point in a specific direction. Let us know what city and state and I am sure someone can help.

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    The standard way people teach to deal with anticipation is to slowly apply pressure to the trigger such that you don't know exactly when it's going to break. Then, assuming you keep the sights on target, when it does break you'll have clean shot with no anticipation. This works best with a good, single-action trigger.

    Read the following, page 28, paragraph (11):

    http://www.sightm1911.com/manual/manual.htm

    It's the field manual for a 1911, but the section I'm referring to really applies to all handguns, and it shows that basic marksmanship techniques have been around for some time.

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    Get your proper sight picture, get a proper sight alighnment, watch the front sight, apply pressure on the trigger. If you have to, just repeat to yourself, "front sight, front sight, front sight, front sight," as you press the trigger smoothly backwards.
    Quote Originally Posted by Open Carry.org Member View Post
    I really disgree with this one! That means that we can have any yahoo running around with a gun with out the proper training. This really scares the hell out of me. Just my two-cents!
    Quote Originally Posted by KansasMustang View Post
    Joe Schmedlap out there with a loaded weapon thinking he's going to deter crime and he's not even trained to fire his weapon safely just kinda makes my hair on the back of my neck stand up.

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    You have to press...press...press...press...press...press... BANG!!

    Let it go of and accept that you CANNOT stop the recoil.

    It takes time to break that habit. You have to keep shooting.

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    As others stated, read about the basics of shooting and/or take a basic pistol class.

    Practice with snap-caps a lot. No bang or recoil and you learn to keep your hands steady. Hit the snap-caps a few thousand times to develop muscle memory. Just make sure if you're in the house that no live ammo is around when you do this..safety first!

    At the range, mix in live rounds with snap-caps. If you are flinching you'll see it much easier when you hit the snap-cap. It's also good training for misfires.

    If you've got the money, get a .22 pistol and shoot a few thousand rounds through with a smaller recoil gun (and the cheaper ammo).

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    In boot camp many years ago, we were instructed to squeeze trigger until the BANG startled us. Then do it again. It simply takes practice. If you drift off target while squeezing, hold whatcha got and finish when back on target.

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    Col. Cooper is credited with sneaking up on the break. Try shooting a revolver with an empty cylinder or two. But the bottom line as others have said is lots of practice and with a critical observer.

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    Doug Huffman wrote:
    Col. Cooper is credited with sneaking up on the break. Try shooting a revolver with an empty cylinder or two. But the bottom line as others have said is lots of practice and with a critical observer.
    +1

    Another idea along the same line is to have your observer load your semi-auto mag and randomly insert a snap cap or 2 or 3...

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    I live in Moses Lake, Wa. Which is kinda in the middle of the state. I have not seen any classes around here.

    Now I have practiced with the trigger unloaded. It does not happen at all, only when I know its loaded. Have to get more ammo and practice more on the range. That 1911 manual paragraph is great. Ill have to practice going slow to the point it goes off. I just tried making it a surprise right now and I can see exactly how this works. I will have to try to apply this at the range next time I go...


    Thanks!

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    Doug Huffman wrote:
    Col. Cooper is credited with sneaking up on the break.* Try shooting a revolver with an empty cylinder or two.* But the bottom line as others have said is lots of practice and with a critical observer.
    Credited by whom? Read the link I posted above. It clearly describes "sneaking up on the break," and it's before Cooper.

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    marshaul wrote:
    Doug Huffman wrote:
    Col. Cooper is credited with sneaking up on the break. Try shooting a revolver with an empty cylinder or two. But the bottom line as others have said is lots of practice and with a critical observer.
    Credited by whom? Read the link I posted above. It clearly describes "sneaking up on the break," and it's before Cooper.
    Don't remember when Cooper came into view, I do know it was 1959 when I was taught 'sneaking' or what you wanna call it. Hope this dates it a little more.

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mod..._of_the_Pistol

    The Modern Technique of the Pistol was developed by Jeff Cooper in the 1950s after experiments with older techniques, such as Point Shooting.

    [ ... ]

    * The Surprise Break The compressed, surprise break of the trigger is used to discharge the firearm.

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    slow steadyPRESS of the trigger. Let it surprise you when it fires.

    As your PRESSING the trigger repeat to yourself,, slow steady,,slow steady,, slow steady. It works!

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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    1st freedom wrote:
    slow steadyPRESS of the trigger. Let it surprise you when it fires.

    As your PRESSING the trigger repeat to yourself,, slow steady,,slow steady,, slow steady. It works!
    As you train, so shall you perform in a crisis. 1000+ repetitions required to develope muscle memory. After good habits start to take hold, gradually increase your speed.

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    If you are shooting right handed, low left usually means you are snapping the trigger at the very end of the pull. Try to squeeze it all the way until the hammer falls. Try dry firing it a few times andpay attention tothe muzzle. A video camera helps a lot here.

    Also, you need to find out which eye is dominate. I'm right handed, but am left eye dominate. I get the same blur you described when sighting with my right eye and both eyes open.I can not use a scoped rifle without closing my left eye. When I shoot a pistol, I have grownaccustomed to using my left eye and keeping both eyes open.

    To see which eye is dominate do the following. Point at a smallobject about 20 feet away with both eyes open and arm extended fully. Without moving your hand, close your right eye. If you are not still pointing directly at the object, then you are right eye dominate. If you arestill pointing directly at it, you are left eye dominate.

    Happy shooting.
    The thing about common sense is....it ain't too common.
    Will Rogers

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    When I first started paying attention to trigger control is when I first started Bow Hunting.

    I carried that with me thru the years, into the Marine Corps and now with every firearm I touch.

    The thing to remember at FIRST is NOT to worry about accuracy so much. Just point it down range, NO TARGETS, and just breathe and pull.

    Pull, pull, pull .... and just let it happen.

    When you realize that your trigger control is working then you can be concerned with better accuracy.

    Also and important note: Only the TIP of your finger should be on the trigger. No further in the trigger guard than where your fingernail ends on the otherside. Just the Tip of the finger.

    BTW, I could provide some videos if you need. From Comp Shooters.

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    Wow! Thanks!
    It appears Im right eye dominate. If I point at something and close my right eye Im not pointing at it any longer.. I have tried lining the sights up with my left eye before.

    I usually start out with the pad of my finger on the trigger but then usually it slips until its is at the first joint. I will have to pay closer attention next time Im out. It appears I will need more ammo. Lots more... $$$

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    I'm probably not one to give advice as I am far from an expert but I found that dry firing a lot helps some. I recently saw a video on a dry fire method that I am going to try but just haven't had the time yet (credit to USCCA). It recommends balancing something on top of the barrel while you dry fire. I won't say what they said to use because it's something you should never have near you when dry firing. I would suggest a spent casing or a small pile of pennies (start with 2 or 3 and go up from there as you get better). They claim this show any jerk or movement you have during your trigger pull. I can image after doing this for a few sessions that it may improve the anticipatory jerk.

    Good luck and be safe.
    Ken

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    BluesStreek....many times have I balanced a nickle on the flat part of a front sight blade (if it was flat). Hold weapon to where you can put coin on blade (or barrel), slowly raise pistol and squeeze.



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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Dustin wrote:
    snip.........

    Also and important note: Only the TIP of your finger should be on the trigger. No further in the trigger guard than where your fingernail ends on the otherside. Just the Tip of the finger.
    Todd Jarrett disagrees with tip of finger on trigger - so do I - use first joint.
    http://tinyurl.com/3sfvft

    This is an excellant visual on acquiring a proper grip also.

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    The point not made is to avoid the pad of the finger for its resilience. Bony tip or bony joint should be on the trigger.

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    Grapeshot wrote:
    Dustin wrote:
    snip.........

    Also and important note: Only the TIP of your finger should be on the trigger. No further in the trigger guard than where your fingernail ends on the otherside. Just the Tip of the finger.
    Todd Jarrett disagrees with tip of finger on trigger - so do I - use first joint.
    http://tinyurl.com/3sfvft

    This is an excellant visual on acquiring a proper grip also.

    Yata hey
    :shock:Huh ? Are you sure ?

    I've watched several of Todd J's vids, and he uses and describes the very same trigger method I just described.

    In this video he clearly describes and shows how he uses his finger TIP(nail area/First joint pad) but not the Crease of the first Joint

    http://splodetv.com/how-todd-jarrett

    Also Springfield Armory's Rob Leatham does the same.

    Just watch the vid so we can get on the same page here. I hope.



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