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Thread: Reloading classes?

  1. #1
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    I've been wanting to get into reloading for awhile now and I was wondering if any you guys know of a good class/person to go in order to learn how? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I don't know of any reloading classes that anyone offers. I would highly suggest finding someone in your neighborhood who reloads a lot and spend a few hours with them in their shop. There is much more to this hobby than just setting up equipment and making bullets to save money. Some mistakes can be fatal. Just find someone local who can show you the ropes so you can avoid making some potentially dangerous or expensive mistakes.

    Just a couple suggestions to get you started:

    If you shoot a bunch already, consider the Dillon 550B. You may be enticed to buy a less expensive single stage but serious shooters/reloaders always end up with a quality multistage.

    Buy Carbide dies for all your rifle loads. They may cost 2-3 times as much but save you a whole lot of .


    Before I started reloading my figures showed that I would recoup my initial investment after 3,000 rounds of .45 ACP. Although I am way past that now, I have learned that reloading does not save money; it just allows you to shoot more.


  3. #3
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    i dont suggest starting with a dillon... simply cause... do you really wanna spend 500$ (thats the LOW end) on a press and kit... and end up not liking it? its really easy, just time consuming and alot of work necessary...

    HOWEVER a tip here... dont spend 100$ on a tumbler! just buy a zip trim from LEE's... and use scotch brite to clean it up on the outside. faster, cheaper, looks nice and polish-y

  4. #4
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    Yep I suggest much the same as the others have told you.

    I learned by watching a friends father reload a couple of times. Then he walked me through my first couple hundred on his equipment.

    He also had me buy the book "The ABC's of Reloading" and read it. Lots of good starter & intermediate info to be had there.

  5. #5
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    Find and buy a book titled "the ABC's of reloading" Read it cover to cover. If I was closer to Ogden, I'd head up and help you out. If my copy of the above book wasn't already out on loan, I'd send it up.

    STRONG reccomendation: If you really want to get into it, go buy the RCBS rockchuker master kit. It has everything you need except loading blocks and dies, even comes with a speer manual. Also buy at least one other manual(I reccomend hornady) for cross checking data.



    There are other cheaper set ups out there, but it terms of value, the RCBS kit can't be beat.







  6. #6
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    Thanks for the advice everyone. I went ahead and ordered the book from Amazon so I"ll give it a good read next week.

  7. #7
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    You won't be dissapointed with that purchase, I assure you. I'm actually thinking of picking up a second copy that is not to leave the house. I've only seen mine intermittently for the last several years.

  8. #8
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    Follow up post. Harvey, did you get the book yet?

  9. #9
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    Yes, I did but I have not had a chance to read it yet. I was thumbing through it and it looked like it had A LOT of good info in it so hopefully I can sit down and read it this week. Thanks for letting me know about it.

  10. #10
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    just finally started reloading yesterday, using 24 grains of H 4895, CCI sr primers, and hornady SP 50gr projectiles

    starting with 24 grains, max load is like 27 (upper 3000 fps') and 25 gr is 3300, so just testin out 24!

  11. #11
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    Does anyone know if this is a good press for a good price?


    Lee Load-Master Progressive Press Kit 9mm Luger
    Product #: 161975
    Our Price: $215.99



  12. #12
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    I have that same press. I mostly reload for rifle though.

    It seems to be an ok press, and for the money, its decent. Some things on it are a bit on the iffy/cheap side though, and it can be frustrating if everything isn't setup correctly. I'd suspect it'll take you about 100-200 rounds to get through the Lee learning curve a bit more if you've never reloaded before.

    When learning, dont start out in full progressive mode. Setup all your stages of course, but only run one brass through at a time until you get the hang of it and quadruple check that all stages are working perfectly.

    The powder drop can be a challenge, specially with such a small amount of powder. It really comes down to the type of powder you use, as with most powder drops of this type. The spherical powders seem to work best with a +- 0.2 gr margin. Extruded seem to be the worst.

    The primer system seems to be the biggest complaint about it, in which I will fully agree with. I got to the point that when I reloaded, I'd do the priming in one batch, then after checking all the brass, do the powder and seating in another batch. I later got a hand primer, which I now use instead. Just too many upside down, sideways, and missing primers with the press. If you do use the priming system with this press, make sure to get extra pieces as you will crush/mangle the primer pusher arm eventually. The kit I bought did have a few extras though.

    Once everything gets setup and you get through the learning curve, it will do pretty good for you.

    That being said, for the reloading I'm doing lately, I prefer my single stage over the progressive, but I'm fine tuning some accuracy loads.

    If I had the option to do it again, I think I would've saved up a little more and got a Dillon 650 instead. I think even the Hornady would've been a better choice.

    There is a privately run forum for the loadmaster presses, including some videos and instructions on setting up the press. (the instructions that come with it are sub-par). http://www.loadmastervideos.com/



    Oh, and as far as a place to buy it if you do decide to go with the Lee, I got mine from http://www.kempfgunshop.com/ for a little less than what you have listed. I would strongly suggest calling in your order though, as the person you're likely to talk to (Sue) is very knowledgeable and will be able to answer any questions you have and suggest other things you may not have thought of. (The shopping list to get started on reloading is pretty large after all)

  13. #13
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    Lee stuff is ok for the money, But if you want to set up just for volume in a specific caliber, I highly reccomend the dillon square deal offering. It's supperior in every way. However the price reflects that.

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