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Thread: Moving to Louisville, could use advice

  1. #1
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    I currently live in VA and hold a CC permit for the state along with a FL non-res.

    What procedures can I expect for getting my KY permit? Also what are the rules for OC in KY...off limits places, car carry laws etc etc. Are you allowed to CC in a restaurant that serves alcohol?

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    It's a painless procedure for getting a CCDW. You will be expected to take a day-long training program, finish up that program with a brief trip to the range, take a short 20-question exam, wait for your training certificate, head over to the Sheriff's office (building right behind the Jefferson County Courthouse), fork over a check for $40, a check for $20, pay $5 for a photo, and wait roughly 4-6 weeks for your permit.

    For open carry, you will find Kentucky generally hospitable. While I believe that generally the off-limits areas for conceal carry "probably" apply to open carry, as well, I have not found a statute that directly addresses that point. A helpful summary of KY state laws can also be found at the NRA http://www.nraila.org/statelawpdfs/KYSL.pdf.

    Welcome to Kentucky!

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    Traveler's checklist:

    *Firearms Ownership:unrestricted, no permit or license required

    *Assault weapon ownership: unrestricted, no permit or license required

    *Machine Gun Ownership:
    no state restrictions, compliance with federal law only

    *Firearm law uniformity:
    preemption law, firearm laws uniform throughout state

    *Right of Self-Defense: castle doctrine, right protected by statute

    *Open carry: unrestricted in most public areas and generally accepted

    *Concealed carry:
    licenses granted to residents on a "shall issue" basis; automatic
    reciprocity for nonresidents with licenses from other states

    *Vehicle carry and transportation:
    firearms (rifles, shotguns and handguns) may
    be carried
    loaded and in plain view; loaded handguns maybe carried in
    the glove compartment (center console box carry is not allowed)


    Kentucky's rolling hills and tree-covered mountains provide the perfect
    setting for any Hollywood production about the early pioneers of the Ohio valley.
    Firearms carry in those days was essential for survival. Fortunately for gun-owners,
    Kentucky still maintains a healthyrespect for this heritage in its firearm laws.

    Kentucky requires a license to carry a firearm concealed on or about one's
    person. The State Police issue such permits through the local sheriff of the
    applicant's home county for a five year term. Kentucky does not grant permits to
    nonresidents but will recognize any permit issued by another state. Kentucky
    licenses allow the concealed carry of any deadly weapon by the permittee.

    A traveler without a permit may carry loaded firearms in a vehicle if the
    weapons are in plain view. Kentucky allows anyone to carry a loaded handgun in a
    visible belt holster or on the dashboard or passenger seat of one's car. Glove
    compartment carry is also considered legitimate as long the compartment is of the
    factory-installed variety on the passenger's side. Console boxes and seat pockets
    are not legitimate areas for unlicensed carry. Carrying a handgun in one of these
    areas is the same as placing the weapon under the seat. Both modes of carry are
    limited to persons possessing carry licenses. Rifles and shotguns may be carried
    loaded and in plain view. The weapons may be secured in gun racks, gun slings, or
    commercial gun cases located anywhere in the vehicle except concealed about the person.

    Travelers may carry loaded firearms in plain view while on foot in virtually any
    public area of the state. Such carry is best limited to visible belt holsters secured on
    one's hip. Kentucky's strong preemption law prevents this activity, as well as most
    others involving firearms, from being locally regulated. Recently, employers were
    further prohibited from preventing employees from carrying firearms in their vehicles
    while the vehicles are parked on company property.



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    Fantastic, thank you. Looks like the 'laws' are even more relaxed in KY. Didn'trealize they had castle doctrine, that's good to know. I like the glove box carry provision too.

    Couple things though, how much is the training program, and is restaurant CC allowed?



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    The training isn't that much....I'll look it up for you. I'm thinking about $150. MgoBlue says $40 + $20 + $5 and about $50 or soto the instructor.

    CC is just fine even with alcohol being servedas long serving FOOD is the main business. Several of us carry open whilst dining. No biggie. Places that may have signs stating 'no guns' can only ask you to leave...no penalty the first time.

    CAVEAT: It is said thatOC in Louisville proper MAY bring trouble. It hasn't yet, though.

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    No restrictions on restaurant carry, provided that the business doesn't make more than 50% of revenue from alcohol sales. Rule of thumb is don't sit in the bar area of a bar and grille. I have OC'd on many occasions at the BBC (Bluegrass Brewing Company), a well-known microbrewery in St. Matthews without incident. The bar and restaurant areas are well-separated, and the food is good. You should go there to eat some time.

    I miss KY. Up here in OH, no carry in establishments selling liquor for on-site consumption. Beer isn't considered liquor, but that still leaves your finer dining choices to be of the fast food variety. To further complicate things, the businesses aren't required to post liquor license numbers on their windows like they are in KY. Carrying in these places is a felony in OH...

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    TheMrMitch wrote:
    The training isn't that much....I'll look it up for you. I'm thinking about $150. MgoBlue says $40 + $20 + $5 and about $50 or soĀ*to the instructor.

    CC is just fine even with alcohol being servedĀ*as long serving FOOD is the main business. Several of us carry open whilst dining. No biggie. Places that may have signs stating 'no guns' can only ask you to leave...no penalty the first time.

    CAVEAT: It is said thatĀ*OC in Louisville proper MAY bring trouble. It hasn't yet, though.
    Sorry, the $60 is strictly the fee for the CCDW permit. Most CCDW training programs are either $75 or $85. The most that you can be charged is $85. I went for my training at Open Range (a very nice indoor facility) in Crestwood, KY -- just to the East of Louisville.

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    Yeah....I had forgotten the exact break down butremembered correctly on the $150....still not bad. Had my class at Bardstown in 1997.

    Took several personal pics in....they still used their camera and charged $5...LOL.

  10. #10
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    Also, I believe you will still have to be a KY resident for 6 months before you can apply for the CDWL.

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    Correct on 6 months. I retired back to Ky in May and had mine after 6 months and one denial.

    Same name as a person in UTAH that had not appeared in court......got it fixed fast.

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    If you have your FL non-res license, the six month wait will be painless. KY recognizes all other valid permits. I carried on my PA non-resident license (that I got while in Ohio) when I moved back to KY.

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    I moved from Falls Church, VA to Northern Kentucky last Fall and like some of the others that have responded to your question, I found it a pretty painless process. Depending on the county the amount of time it takes to get your KY CCDW back after you have completed the required training and applied can vary from 1-2 months but in my county in Norther KY it took barely 3-4 weeks. I have also found two interesting differences, first the law here about restaurants is a bit more flexible than for the VA CCW, it says you cannot carry only in "any portion of an establishment licensed to dispense beer or alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises, which portion of the establishment is primarily devoted to that purposeĶ¾to me that means for example if you are in Appleby's on the restaurant side and not in the bar side, you are good to go in KY wheras as we could legally only OC in that situation in VA. Also there seems to be no restriction about concealed carry in churches as there was in VA. Finally glove box carry is legal in KY even without your KY CCDW again that was not the case in VA. At last count I have also found that my KY CCDW is good in 33 states (it recently became good in S. Carolina to make it 33) which again is more states than my previous VA resident CCW.

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    You're right about KY's permit being a bit more flexible. I remember for a couple years after our law passed, VA would not recognize KY's because ours is a concealed WEAPONS license, not just a pistol permit. I guess they didn't like the thought of knives, shurikens, etc...!

    One thing to remember about churches, some of them have schools or day care in the building during the week, which would make them prohibited places.

    Mike

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    Kentucky is a great state. I OCed in Louisville back in May during the NRA convention, in front of LEO's none the less, and no one cared and or stopped me. You could very easily get away without having a CC incense in Kentucky.

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