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Thread: Modify Permit

  1. #1
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    Since it was upheld that it wasn't a crime to modify state licence plate on your
    own car. Couldn't the same be used to modify permit back?

    She was dedacting 'offensive' language, can't we do the same to those offensive restrictions?

  2. #2
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    The "offensive" language you're referring to is "or Die" in the NH state motto "Live Free or Die", yes?

  3. #3
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    nope, wouldn't dedact that motto.

  4. #4
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    I wouldn't either. It's easily the greatest state motto of all time. However, there was a case where an NH citizen removed "or Die" from his license plate because it offended him. The court sided in his favor.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_Fr...e#Legal_battle

  5. #5
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    nope me either, great motto, and I think everyone should live by it.

  6. #6
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    Came accross this and thought it was interesting so I wanted to share:

    History of Alabama's State Motto- "Audemus Jura Nostra Defendere"
    This Latin statement translates as "We dare maintain our rights." Marie Bankhead Owen, the director of the state archives, came across the idea for this motto when she was searching for a "phrase that would interpret the spirit of our peoples in a terse and energetic sentence." The Birmingham News-Age Herald reported that she came upon a poem entitled, "What Constitutes a State?" by Sir William Jones and one stanza stood out in particular to her. "Men who their duties know. But know their rights, and knowing, dare maintain."

    This was not the first motto given to the state of Alabama. Following the Civil War, during the Reconstruction era, the United States legislature assigned "Here we Rest" as Alabama's state motto. Because the people of the state did not choose it, the motto was viewed as a repulsive. The meaning was meant to convey peace, as in the laying down of arms and a re-entry into the United States. But for the proud state that had lost many sons on the battlefield and once housed the capital of the Confederate States, it would not do.


    When Marie Bankhead Owen came across the poem and pulled out the phrase, "We Dare Maintain Our Rights," she had found what the people of the state had been looking for. In 1923, the new state coat of arms was completed with the motto translated into Latin by Professor W. B. Saffold of the University of Alabama. Some translate the phrase, "we dare defend our rights" and this could not be truer of the state.

  7. #7
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    Dianosis wrote:
    Came accross this and thought it was interesting so I wanted to share:

    History of Alabama's State Motto- "Audemus Jura Nostra Defendere"
    This Latin statement translates as "We dare maintain our rights." Marie Bankhead Owen, the director of the state archives, came across the idea for this motto when she was searching for a "phrase that would interpret the spirit of our peoples in a terse and energetic sentence." The Birmingham News-Age Herald reported that she came upon a poem entitled, "What Constitutes a State?" by Sir William Jones and one stanza stood out in particular to her. "Men who their duties know. But know their rights, and knowing, dare maintain."

    This was not the first motto given to the state of Alabama. Following the Civil War, during the Reconstruction era, the United States legislature assigned "Here we Rest" as Alabama's state motto. Because the people of the state did not choose it, the motto was viewed as a repulsive. The meaning was meant to convey peace, as in the laying down of arms and a re-entry into the United States. But for the proud state that had lost many sons on the battlefield and once housed the capital of the Confederate States, it would not do.


    When Marie Bankhead Owen came across the poem and pulled out the phrase, "We Dare Maintain Our Rights," she had found what the people of the state had been looking for. In 1923, the new state coat of arms was completed with the motto translated into Latin by Professor W. B. Saffold of the University of Alabama. Some translate the phrase, "we dare defend our rights" and this could not be truer of the state.
    very interesting, I didn't know that, it looks like someone else on here does alot of history research as well as myself, but I didn't think of looking up Alabama states motto, if It had change over the past or not. But I love our states motto now, great motto, and it fits the state perfect.

  8. #8
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    The first time I came across "We dare defend our rights" was at a rest stop somewhere in northern Alabama. It was inscribed on a stone monument in the grass. It had always stuck with me and I never knew until just this week that it was the state motto. I was writing something onanother post and felt patriotic and it came back to me so I ended my post with it then decided to google it. Shortly after, I read this post

  9. #9
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    Dianosis wrote:
    The first time I came across "We dare defend our rights" was at a rest stop somewhere in northern Alabama. It was inscribed on a stone monument in the grass. It had always stuck with me and I never knew until just this week that it was the state motto. I was writing something onanother post and felt patriotic and it came back to me so I ended my post with it then decided to google it. Shortly after, I read this post
    Wow that's awesome Dianosis, and its a great thing to feel patriotic about your feeling when doing anything and then taking it a step further and doing stuff about it like referencing the state motto or reading our states constitution and maybe even peaceful get together

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