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Thread: Tuson college student repells home invasion...

  1. #1
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    Young Tucson college student defends himself against home invasion, shoots bad guys...

    http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/crime/262693

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    from the article:

    Ali Adelmann, a UA sophomore, just moved into the neighborhood this semester and was concerned about what happened.
    “It really worries me,” the Phoenix resident said. “All we can do is keep our doors and windows locked.”
    OK, so Ali has an attention deficit disorder. Obviously, there is more that they can do, like, arming up. Worked well for the other student.

  3. #3
    Regular Member MetalChris's Avatar
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    Tucson police: Evidence at UA-area double-shooting consistent with self defense

    By Alexis Huicochea
    Arizona Daily Star
    Tucson, Arizona | Published: 10.16.2008

    Evidence in a fatal shooting of two home invaders by a University of Arizona student appears to be consistent with his story that he was defending himself, police said.
    At least one of the invaders was armed with a gun during the incident, which occurred shortly after 12:30 a.m., according to Sgt. Fabian Pacheco, a Tucson Police Department spokesman.
    The 23-year-old student was home alone in the 800 block of East Adams Street — near North Euclid Avenue and East Speedway — when the home invasion occurred.
    There was a knock at the door, at which time he armed himself with a gun because of the late hour, Pacheco said.
    The man at the door asked for someone and the student told him that the person did not live there, Pacheco said.
    The student looked past the man he was speaking with and saw another man who had his face covered and was armed with a gun.
    He attempted to retreat into his home but the men made their way in, Pacheco said.
    The student called police to report the shooting and when officers arrived at the guest house they found the two men dead inside just past the doorway.
    Their names and exact ages were not released, but one was in his mid to late 20s and the other was about 25 years old, Pacheco said.
    The UA student was questioned and is cooperating with police, Pacheco said. His name is not being released.
    There is no indication that the student is or has been involved in any criminal activity, police said.
    Pacheco could not say what the men were looking for or if they had possibly gone to the wrong house.
    The case will be presented to the Pima County Attorney’s Office for a determination on whether the double homicide was justified, Pacheco said.
    Ali Adelmann, a UA sophomore, just moved into the neighborhood this semester and was concerned about what happened.
    “It really worries me,” the Phoenix resident said. “All we can do is keep our doors and windows locked.”
    Jenny Wise also moved into the neighborhood in August. The 19-year-old sophomore said she wasn’t home at the time.
    She had gone to a party and upon arriving home around 2 a.m. found her street taped off and flooded with police.
    “It’s really the scariest thing,” Wise said. “I’ve lived a sheltered life. This seems like a nice little neighborhood. I don’t know what I would’ve done if two guys tried to get into my house.”
    ----------------
    Good shoot! Got 'em just inside the door...nice.

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    Regular Member PikesPeakMtnMan's Avatar
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    Good job. Good shooting.
    One day your life is going to flash before your eyes, make it worth watching.

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    Campaign Veteran Bookman's Avatar
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    Sounds like he kept his cool and took care of the business at hand.

    Good Shootin'!:celebrate:celebrate
    "All that is required for evil to prevail is for good men to do nothing." - Edmund Burke


    "I like people who stand on the Constitution... unless they're using it to wipe their feet." - Jon E Hutcherson

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    Damn, I lived not too far from there when I went to the U of A. Had several friends that lived within a couple of blocks of that intersection. I'm glad the guy is safe, sounds like he thought and acted smartly.

    --RedKnightt--

    Zombie Squad has it right: “We hold fast to the belief that if you are prepared for a scenario where the walking corpses of your family and neighbors are trying to eat you alive, you will be prepared for almost anything.”

  7. #7
    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    Slightly different story...


    Police: 2 killed in home invasion may be tied to previous tenant
    SHERYL KORNMAN and FERNANDA ECHÁVARRI
    Tucson Citizen

    Both men identified by Tucson police as the suspects killed in an apparent home invasion Thursday north of the University of Arizona had criminal records here.
    Shontel L. Early, 30, and Wesley O. Fenstermacher, 29, were shot and killed by a UA student, said Sgt. Fabian Pacheco.


    He said the shooting is still under investigation.

    The men were killed after they forced their way into the rental property in the 800 block of E. Adams St., Pacheco said in a news release.


    According to public court records, Fenstermacher had been arrested eight times and Early 10 times over the last 10 years on a variety of misdemeanor charges. Some of the cases were traffic offenses.

    Early was found guilty of theft in 1999; in 2003, four individuals obtained an order of protection against him alleging domestic violence.

    In September 2008, he was found guilty of driving with a suspended license.

    Fenstermacher was found guilty of criminal trespassing in 2004. He was arrested on an aggravated assault charge in 2005 and pleaded guilty to a DUI charge in 2000.

    Pacheco gave this account of the incident:

    At 12:38 a.m. Thursday, Operations Division West police officers were sent to a residence in the 800 block of E. Adams St, "in reference to a shooting."

    The resident called 911 and reported that he shot two men who forced entry into his home at gunpoint.

    Tucson Police Homicide Detectives determined the home's tenant was alone in a one-bedroom guesthouse when he answered a knock at his front door.

    The man saw two men, one of them pointing a handgun at him, Pacheco said.

    He said that as he tried to close the door, the men pushed their way in as he ran for his own gun.

    The 23-year-old victim fired at them, killing both of them, Pacheco said.

    The victim told police one of the men had covered his face in a bandanna.

    What the two men were seeking at the rental property is not known, Pacheco said.

    The student had been renting the home for a few months and there was no indication he was involved in any activity that would have made him a target, he said.

    He said it's possible the men were targeting whoever lived in the rental prior to the current tenant, or that the attack was random.

    Students living off campus in the UA area are "generally safe," said Sgt. Juan Alvarez of the University of Arizona Police Department, which does not have jurisdiction in this case.
    He urged students who hear noises outside their residence and suspect they are at risk to call 911.

    http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/local/99759.php

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    Props tot the newspaper for properly identifying (for once) the victim in this situation.

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    When it comes to the thought of a home invasion most of the sheeple will ask themselves "What am I going to do?" In my case the question is more along the lines of "Pistol, shotgun, or rifle?"



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    MetalChris wrote:
    Jenny Wise also moved into the neighborhood in August. The 19-year-old sophomore said she wasn’t home at the time......
    “It’s really the scariest thing,” Wise said. “I’ve lived a sheltered life. This seems like a nice little neighborhood. I don’t know what I would’ve done if two guys tried to get into my house.”
    I'm surprised none commented on this.

    protector84 wrote:
    When it comes to the thought of a home invasion most of the sheeple will ask themselves "What am I going to do?" In my case the question is more along the lines of "Pistol, shotgun, or rifle?"
    See, I'm stuck with "Pistol or shotgun", because a Mosin Nagant is a poor choice for a close combat weapon.

    I'd rather stick with the Mossberg, 1911, or XD-40.

    Well, I suppose I could spear them with the Nagant's bayonet.

    Also, can we send this guy a box of ammo?
    Why open carry? Because 1911 > 911.

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    protector84 wrote:
    When it comes to the thought of a home invasion most of the sheeple will ask themselves "What am I going to do?" In my case the question is more along the lines of "Pistol, shotgun, or rifle?"

    In my case the answer to this question is whichever one I am closest to at the moment.

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    Surprised nobody mentioned it yet, but why in the hell did he open the door?

    All the same, +2 for the good guys. 18 arrests between them in the last 10 years? Only a matter of time until they start raping and murdering, good riddance.

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    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    I was in the bedroom when I heard my wife 'n sis-in-law start yellin': "YAY!" 'clappin 'n whistlin'

    I came out 'n asked: 'Whussup?' The story was on KGUN 9... No details on what kind'a gun the student used... but it was effective (as was he). 'Smoked both of 'em.

    'Just on the radio news... 10 shots (at least) were fired by the student. Dunno how many hits but he lit 'em up. 'Sound's like a dubble stacked mag... whatever it was.

    The OBVIOUS seems to have escaped several...:

    Ali Adelmann, a UA sophomore, just moved into the neighborhood this semester and was concerned about what happened.
    “It really worries me,” the Phoenix resident said. “All we can do is keep our doors and windows locked.”

    No Ali... you can arm and defend YOURSELF!

    “It’s really the scariest thing,” Wise said. “I’ve lived a sheltered life. This seems like a nice little neighborhood. I don’t know what I would’ve done if two guys tried to get into my house.”

    You would have been raped, sodomized, robbed and murdered if you could not defend yourself.

    "Sgt. Juan Alvarez of the University of Arizona Police Department, which does not have jurisdiction in this case.
    He urged students who hear noises outside their residence and suspect they are at risk to call 911."

    Now here's a LEO... in Tucson... advising the obvious with full knowledge of the response timeby undermannedTPD... WITH NO MENTION of use of arms. Well... he works for U of A... and I know how that works. (Guns are bad...)

    Wherever the student had that gun... it wasn't far away... he may even have had it on him... 'cause the perps didn't get far. I suspect he may have been heeled when the knock on the door came. (Maybe the DC city gummint will get a clue from this incident?) I'm heeled all the time. It's just part of gettin' dressed.

    GOOD SHOOT! :celebrate





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    AbNo wrote:
    See, I'm stuck with "Pistol or shotgun", because a Mosin Nagant is a poor choice for a close combat weapon.
    Fix Bayonet...

    Anyways, for answering the door at night, definitly the handgun. For hearing a noise in the middle of the night and doing a house check. The Rem 870 with 00 is coming with me.

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    Task Force 16 wrote:
    from the article:

    Ali Adelmann, a UA sophomore, just moved into the neighborhood this semester and was concerned about what happened.
    “It really worries me,” the Phoenix resident said. “All we can do is keep our doors and windows locked.”
    OK, so Ali has an attention deficit disorder. Obviously, there is more that they can do, like, arming up. Worked well for the other student.
    What is the age for possessing a pistol in Arizona? What is the age to obtain a CPL/CCW in Arizona? If he is a resident of another state, what other hoops might he have to jump through? Does he live on campus--if so, does UofA allow weapons in dorms?


    A lot of the rights that we all enjoy do not extend to those who are in college... in some places it may be easier... in WA, he could have a pistol (but no CPL)... though, oddly he could not buy the pistol at a store--but could receive it as a gift... he could buy a shotgun... but he couldn't have either on a college campus--with some caveats--many more details in WA forum...

    Just some food for thought-- the answer may not be so simple as just buying a gun... not to mention the cost of a gun and training is beyond most college student's budgets...

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    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    Relative to your direct question... the minumum age to 'open carry' unsupervisedis 18. Concealed carry (AZ CWP) is 21. Nothing is required for open carry except you must be legally able to possess a firearm... and have a pulse.

    For general information on each policy, click the heading for that policy. Please note that many firearm-related laws have exceptions for military and law enforcement personnel.







    No relevant statutes currently exist.






    Federal law generally requires that licensed firearms dealers conduct a background check on all prospective firearms purchasers to ensure that such persons are not prohibited from buying or possessing a firearm. This background check requirement and the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (“NICS”) were enacted through the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, pursuant to Public Law 103-159, and codified at 18 U.S.C. § 921 et seq. Federal law defines a number of classes of prohibited purchasers (including felons, fugitives, persons adjudicated as “mental defectives” or those committed to mental institutions), and leaves to the states the power to determine additional classes. (For a complete list of federally prohibited purchasers, click here.)

    Under the Brady Act, states have the option of serving as a “state point of contact” and conducting their own background checks using NICS and state informational records and databases, or having the checks performed by the FBI using only NICS. Federal law does not require that private sellers (persons other than firearms dealers) conduct background checks on prospective purchasers.

    In Arizona, all firearms transfers by licensed dealers are processed directly through the FBI, which enforces the federal purchaser prohibitions referenced above. Bureau of Justice Statistics Survey of State Procedures Related to Firearm Sales, Midyear 2004 (August 2005). In addition, Arizona has adopted other classes of prohibited persons, and incorporated some of the federal prohibitions as state offenses. Under Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated §§ 13-3102(A)(4) and 13-3101(A)(6), Arizona prohibits possession of a firearm by any person who:


    • Has been found to constitute a danger to himself or herself or others pursuant to court order under section 36-540, and whose court-ordered treatment has not been terminated by court order;

    • Has been convicted within or outside of Arizona of a felony or who has been adjudicated delinquent for a felony and whose civil right to possess or carry a firearm has not been restored;

    • Is at the time of possession serving a term of imprisonment in any correctional or detention facility;

    • Is at the time of possession serving a term of probation pursuant to a conviction for a domestic violence offense as defined in section 13-3601 or a felony offense, parole, community supervision, work furlough, home arrest or release on any other basis or who is serving a term of probation or parole pursuant to the interstate compact under Title 31, Chapter 3, Article 4; or

    • Is a prohibited possessor under 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(5), except as provided by 18 U.S.C. § 922(y).

    In addition, pursuant to section 13-3113, any person who was previously adjudicated delinquent for an offense that would be a felony if committed by an adult, and who possesses, uses or carries a firearm within ten years from the date of his or her adjudication or release or escape from custody is criminally liable for a class 5 felony for a first offense and a class 4 felony for a second or subsequent offense if the person was previously adjudicated for an offense that, if committed as an adult, would constitute:


    • Burglary in the first degree;

    • Burglary in the second degree;

    • Arson;

    • Any felony offense involving the use or threatening exhibition of a deadly weapon or dangerous instrument; or

    • A serious offense as defined in section 13-604.

    Section 13-904 states that a conviction for a felony suspends the person’s right to possess a gun or firearm. A person who is adjudicated delinquent under section 8-341 for a felony also does not have the right to carry or possess a gun or firearm. Id.

    If a juvenile is adjudicated delinquent for an offense that if committed by an adult would be a misdemeanor, the court may prohibit the juvenile from carrying or possessing a firearm while the juvenile is under the jurisdiction of the department of juvenile corrections or the juvenile court. Section 8-341(R) (as amended by 2006 Ariz. Sess. Laws. ch. 221, § 1.)

    Unless he or she is otherwise authorized by law, a person is guilty of a class 2 felony if he or she knowingly conveys a firearm to a person confined in a correctional facility. Section 13-2505. Such persons are prohibited from possessing firearms. Id. The same is true of persons confined in a secure care facility under the jurisdiction of the department of juvenile corrections. Section 13-2514.

    Section 13-3111 generally prohibits the possession of a firearm by a person under 18. See the Arizona Minimum Age to Purchase/Possess section for further details.

    An emergency order of protection (which a court may issue if a peace officer states that a person is in immediate and present danger based on a recent incident of domestic violence) may prohibit the defendant from possessing or purchasing a firearm for the duration of the order. Section 13-3624(D)(4).

    Under federal law, persons who have been issued state permits to purchase or possess firearms are exempt from background checks if those permits were issued: 1) within the previous five years in the state in which the transfer is to take place; and 2) after an authorized government official has conducted a background investigation, including a search of the NICS database, to verify that possession of a firearm would not be unlawful. 18 U.S.C. § 922(t)(3), 27 C.F.R. § 478.102(d). Concealed weapons permit holders in Arizona are exempt from background checks when purchasing a firearm, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) chart that outlines those permits that qualify as alternatives to the Brady Act. Please note that ATF’s exempt status determination is subject to change without notice. For further information, see the Arizona Carrying Firearms section.

    Firearms transfers by private sellers (non-firearms dealers) are not subject to background checks in Arizona, although federal and state purchaser prohibitions still apply. See the Arizona Private/Secondary Sales section.






    No relevant statutes currently exist.






    Possession Restrictions

    Pursuant to Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3102(A)(11)-(13), no person (except for certain law enforcement, military or correctional personnel, see section 13-3102(C)), may carry firearms:


    • Into an election polling place on the day of any election;

    • In a nuclear or hydroelectric generating station; or

    • On school grounds (except, under § 13-3102(I), when possessing a firearm: 1) that is not loaded and that is carried within a means of transportation under the control of an adult, provided that if the adult leaves that means of transportation the firearm shall not be visible from the outside and the means of transportation shall be locked; or 2) for use on the school grounds in a program approved by a school). Section 15-341(A)(25) also requires the governing board of a school district to prescribe and enforce policies and procedures prohibiting weapons on school grounds without specific authorization from the school administrator.

    No person may carry firearms into any "public establishment," or while attending any "public event," after a reasonable request to remove the weapon and place it in the custody of the operator of the establishment or sponsor of the event for temporary and secure storage. Section 13-3102(A)(10). "Public establishment" means a structure, vehicle or craft owned, leased or operated by the state or a political subdivision. Section 13-3102(L)(1). "Public event" means an event of limited duration conducted by a public entity or a private entity with a permit or license granted by a public entity. Section 13-3102(L)(2). Unless the operator or sponsor is licensed to manufacture, sell, or deal in liquor, the storage shall be readily accessible on entry and allow for the immediate retrieval of the weapon on exit from the establishment or event. Section 13-3102.01.

    In addition, Arizona prohibits any person from possessing a firearm while on the licensed premises of an alcoholic beverage retailer, knowing such possession is prohibited. Section 4-244(29). This prohibition does not apply to peace officers, the licensee, an employee of the licensee acting with the licensee's permission, hotel or motel guests, or to the exhibition or display of a firearm in conjunction with a meeting, show, class or similar event. Id. Neither does the paragraph include a situation in which a person is on licensed premises for a limited time to seek emergency aid and who does not buy, receive, consume, or possess spirituous liquor. Id.

    A person not authorized by law, who takes a firearm into a jail or the grounds belonging or adjacent thereto, is guilty of a class 5 felony. Section 31-129. Unless he or she is otherwise authorized by law, a person is guilty of a class 2 felony if he or she knowingly takes a firearm onto the grounds of a correctional facility, or a secure care facility under the jurisdiction of the department of juvenile corrections. Section 13-2505; section 13-2514. A person is also guilty of a class 2 felony if he or she possesses a firearm while confined in such a correctional facility or secure care facility. Id.

    State administrative regulations govern firearms in:


    Transportation of Firearms

    Under Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3102(A)(2) and (J), a person commits a class 1 misdemeanor by knowingly carrying a concealed deadly weapon (including a firearm; see § 13-3101) within his or her immediate control while in or on a means of transportation without a permit issued under section 13-3112. Section 13-3102(A)(2) does not apply to a weapon carried in a case, holster, scabbard, pack or luggage that is carried within a means of transportation or within a storage compartment, map pocket, trunk or glove compartment of a means of transportation. Section 13-3102(F).

    No firearms shall be carried in the body of any vehicle transporting explosives unless the loading of the firearms and explosives comply with Department of Transportation regulations. Ariz. Admin. Code § 11-1-242(A).

    A school bus driver or passenger shall not carry a firearm on, or transport a firearm in, a school bus as defined by school-district policy. Ariz. Admin. Code § 17-9-104(D)(20).

    Concealed Weapons Licensing Requirements

    Arizona is a "shall issue" state, meaning that the Arizona Department of Public Safety ("DPS") must issue a permit to carry a concealed weapon if the applicant meets certain qualifications. Pursuant to Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3112(E), DPS shall issue a permit to an applicant who:


    • Is an Arizona resident or United States citizen;

    • Is age 21 or older;

    • Is not under indictment for and has not been convicted in any jurisdiction of a felony;

    • Does not suffer from mental illness and has not been adjudicated mentally incompetent or committed to a mental institution;

    • Is not unlawfully present in the United States; and

    • Satisfactorily completes a firearms safety training program approved by DPS under section 13-3112(O). The firearms safety training requirement does not apply to certain active and retired peace officers and detention officers. Section 13-3112(E)(6), (X).

    Section 13-3112(O) requires approved firearms safety training programs to address the following topics:


    • Legal issues relating to the use of deadly force;

    • Weapon care and maintenance;

    • Mental conditioning for the use of deadly force;

    • Safe handling and storage of weapons;

    • Marksmanship; and

    • Judgmental shooting.

    The fee for a concealed weapons permit is $43. Ariz. Admin. Code § 13-9-102. See Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3112(A)-(D), (F)-(H), (N)-(R) and Arizona Administrative Code §§ 13-9-101—13-9-402 for additional application and background check requirements, as well as permit suspension or disqualification information.

    Under Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3102(A)(1), a person commits misconduct involving weapons (a class 1 misdemeanor; see § 13-3102(J)) by knowingly carrying a deadly weapon concealed on his or her person without a permit per section 13-3112. Section 13-3102(A)(1) does not apply to a weapon carried in a belt holster which is wholly or partially visible, or carried in a scabbard or case designed for carrying weapons which is wholly or partially visible, or carried in luggage. Under section 13-3102(A)(2), a person commits misconduct involving weapons by knowingly carrying a deadly weapon without a permit per section 13-3112 concealed within the immediate control of any person in or on a means of transportation. Deadly weapons explicitly include firearms. Section 13-3102(F). Section 13-3102(A)(2) shall not apply to a weapon carried in a case, holster, scabbard, pack or luggage that is carried within a means of transportation or within a storage compartment, map pocket, trunk or glove compartment of a means of transportation. Id.

    Disclosure or Use of Information

    Arizona does not allow the personal application or permit information of concealed weapons permit holders to be made public. Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 13-3112(J). DPS does, however, maintain a computerized permit record system that is accessible to criminal justice agencies for the purpose of confirming the permit status of any person who claims to hold a valid permit issued in Arizona. Id. This information and any other records that are maintained regarding applicants, permit holders, or firearms safety instructors are not available to any other person or entity except by order from a state or federal court. Id.

    DPS is also required to maintain information comparing the number of permits requested, issued, and denied, and must report these figures annually to the governor and the legislature. Section 13-3112(S).

    Duration & Renewal

    A concealed weapons permit is valid for five years. Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 13-3112(I). Permits are renewable for four-year periods, but applicants must undergo a new criminal history record check. Section 13-3112(L).

    Location Limits

    Concealed weapons permit holders are subject to generally applicable limits on the locations where firearms may be carried. Please see the Arizona Possession Restrictions section above for further information.

    Reciprocity

    Arizona recognizes concealed weapon, firearm, or handgun permits or licenses issued by other states if the permit or license is recognized as valid in the issuing state, and the permit or license holder:


    • Is not an Arizona resident;

    • Is legally present in Arizona; and

    • Is not legally prohibited from possessing a firearm in Arizona.

    Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 13-3112(U).

    However, even when the requirements of section 13-3112(U) are met, the person with a concealed weapons permit from another state may not carry a concealed weapon in Arizona if the person is under 21 years of age, or is under indictment for, or has been convicted of, a felony in any jurisdiction, even if the person’s rights have been restored and the conviction has been expunged, set aside or vacated. Section 13-3112(W).

    Arizona will enter into a written reciprocity agreement with another state if that state requires the agreement for establishing mutual permit or license recognition. Section 13-3112(V).

    Brady Exemption

    Concealed weapons permit holders in Arizona are exempt from background checks when purchasing a firearm, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) chart that outlines those permits that qualify as alternatives to the Brady Act. Please note that ATF’s exempt status determination is subject to change without notice. For further information, see the Arizona Background Checks section.






    No relevant statutes currently exist.






    Arizona does not license firearms dealers. Firearms dealers are, however, subject to state laws governing gun sales generally. See the Arizona Private/Secondary Sales section for further information. Pursuant to the federal Brady Act, federally licensed firearms dealers must conduct background checks on prospective purchasers each time the dealer transfers a firearm. See the Arizona Background Checks section.

    Pawnbrokers are required to maintain at their place of business records of all reportable transactions and pawn tickets for at least two years. Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 44-1624(G). On request by a local law enforcement agent in the course of the agent’s duties, the pawnbroker must allow the agent to inspect the receipts, pawn tickets or required alcohol, tobacco and firearms logs or to review any article received by pledge, purchase or trade. Id. Furthermore, pawnbrokers must produce their register, exhibit all articles received in pledge or purchase, or produce the account of sales to a local law enforcement agency on the agency’s request, or on service of a search warrant or order issued by a judge or magistrate. Section 44-1624(H). A pawnbroker shall not enter into any pawn transaction or good faith outright purchase of a firearm that has the manufacturer’s serial number removed, altered or obliterated. Section 44-1624(C).

    Federally Licensed Firearms Dealers

    There are approximately 1,199 federally licensed firearms dealers and pawnbrokers in Arizona. Federal firearms licensee totals for Arizona as of October 19, 2006 were provided by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.






    See the Arizona Private/Secondary Sales section for state laws that apply at gun shows.






    Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 12-714(A) states that "[a] political subdivision of this state shall not commence a qualified civil liability action in any Arizona court."

    "Qualified civil liability action" is defined as "a civil action brought by a political subdivision against a manufacturer or seller of a qualified product or a trade association, for damages resulting from the criminal or unlawful misuse of a qualified product by a third party." Section 12-714(C)(2). This does not include an action brought against a transferor convicted under 18 U.S.C. § 924(h) or Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3102(A)(14) by a party directly harmed by the conduct of which the transferee is convicted. Section 12-714(C)(2).

    Under section 12-714(C)(3), "qualified product" means a non-defective firearm as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(3) or non-defective ammunition as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(17), or a component part of a firearm or ammunition, that has been shipped or transported in interstate or foreign commerce. "Seller" includes a person who, in the course of a business conducted for that purpose, is involved in placing a qualified product in the stream of commerce. Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 12-714(C)(4). "Seller" also includes a person who repairs or maintains any aspect of a qualified product. Id.

    Finally, Arizona provides an affirmative defense to any civil liability or claim for equitable relief arising from any allegation regarding noise or noise pollution that results from owning, operating or using an outdoor shooting range to the entity or individual owning, operating or using the range in compliance with Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated Title 17, Chapter 6, Article 1. Section 17-605(A).

    For detailed information about government and private party lawsuits against the gun industry, the status of litigation involving gun industry immunity statutes in various states, or pending gun industry immunity legislation, visit the Brady Center's Legal Action Project and the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence's Gun Industry Immunity page.






    No relevant statutes currently exist.






    No relevant statutes currently exist.






    Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3108(B) provides that no political subdivision of this state shall "require the licensing or registration of firearms or ammunition or any firearm or ammunition components. . . ." No other relevant statutes currently exist.






    In order to be listed with the state’s child care resource and referral system, an unlicensed child care provider must separately store firearms and ammunition under lock and key or combination lock. Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 41-1967.01(I).

    An administrative regulation requires a certified family child care home provider to store firearms and ammunition separately from one another, under lock and key or combination lock. Ariz. Admin. Code § 6-5-5203(5). Similar regulations apply to:







    Arizona Revised Statutes Annotated § 13-3111(A) prohibits an unemancipated person under 18 years of age from knowingly carrying or possessing a firearm on his person, within his immediate control, or in or on a means of transportation, in any place that is open to the public or on any street or highway or on any private property (except private property owned or leased by the minor or the minor's parent, grandparent or guardian) unless that person is accompanied by a parent, grandparent, or guardian, or a certified hunter safety instructor or certified firearms safety instructor acting with the consent of the unemancipated person's parent or guardian. This prohibition does not apply to a person who is 14 to 17 years of age and who is:


    • Engaged in lawful hunting or shooting events or marksmanship practice at an established range or other area where the discharge of a firearm is not prohibited;

    • Engaged in lawful transportation of an unloaded firearm for the purpose of lawful hunting;

    • Engaged in lawful transportation of an unloaded firearm between the hours of 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. for the purpose of a shooting event or marksmanship practice at an established range or other area where the discharge of a firearm is not prohibited; or

    • Engaged in an activity requiring the use of a firearm that is related to the production of crops, livestock, poultry, livestock products, poultry products, or ratites or in the production or storage of agricultural commodities.

  17. #17
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    David.Car wrote:
    AbNo wrote:
    See, I'm stuck with "Pistol or shotgun", because a Mosin Nagant is a poor choice for a close combat weapon.
    Fix Bayonet...

    Anyways, for answering the door at night, definitly the handgun. For hearing a noise in the middle of the night and doing a house check. The Rem 870 with 00 is coming with me.
    See, I thought about that, but I live in a small apartment, so it would be unwieldly. The bayonet would be better UNmounted. I mean, a two-foot stabbing spike is still a good close-combat weapon.
    Why open carry? Because 1911 > 911.

  18. #18
    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    'Wish people would learn how to spell 'Tucson'.

  19. #19
    Regular Member TechnoWeenie's Avatar
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    There was a knock at the door, at which time he armed himself with a gun because of the late hour, Pacheco said.
    (...)the men pushed their way in as he ran for his own gun.

    Evangelical lessons are provided upon request. Anyone wishing to meet Jesus can just kick in my door.

  20. #20
    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    10-1 he already had it in hand... or on him.

  21. #21
    Regular Member CrossFire's Avatar
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    The first article tends to allude to that.

  22. #22
    Campaign Veteran deepdiver's Avatar
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    Good for the student defending his home and himself. Scratch two scumbags.
    Bob Owens @ Bearing Arms (paraphrased): "These people aren't against violence; they're very much in favor of violence. They're against armed resistance."

  23. #23
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    'Wish people would learn how to spell 'Tucson'.
    Hey, don't blame me, it was spell check that missed it!

    BTW, there have been more than several home invasions in Tucson in past weeks.
    More than a few BG's were shot by home owners.

  24. #24
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    I'm also a college student and keep a Sig SP2022 next to my bed in a holster bolted to my nightstand. Haven't had to use it yet, but it is fully loaded (one in the pipe) with another 15 round magazine sitting right next to it.

    I'm contemplating getting a shotgun after I move out of the current apartment, but I don't currently have any effective way to secure a long arm at home.

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    protector84 wrote:
    When it comes to the thought of a home invasion most of the sheeple will ask themselves "What am I going to do?" In my case the question is more along the lines of "Pistol, shotgun, or rifle?"

    Shotgun. Always.

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