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Thread: Planning WAY ahead of time for my first pistol.

  1. #1
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    I'm currently eighteen and have wanted a pistol for the longest time. I'm no stranger to handling pistols or shooting them but I am a stranger to the variety of guns, the parts of the guns, and everything in-between. :P And I'm not as familiar with them as I am with small game rifles.


    And because of this, self research is quite difficult. But I figure I might as well start planning for when I turn 21.



    Basically I want a pistol that is aesthetically pleasing, accurate, dependable and has a decent bullet capacity.

    I can't for the life of me remember what they're called but they single action revolvers with longer barrels; the kind you would see in western movies have so far been the most comfortable to shoot. My grandfather has a few but I haven't shot them in a awhile. Edit: Ah I'm retarded! I remember now, they were single action 45 colts. :]


    If I go for a more modern gun, I'm set on a .45. And am liking a lot of the Kimber 1911's but have no idea what the main differences in the models are.

    Also I'm leaning more towards a shoulder/chest holster rather than a hip one. Largely because I commute on a bicycle and a hip holster would be in the way. Any recommendations of holsters to keep in mind?

    Another thing I just thought of, affordable target ammunition is important as well. :]

    Thank you in advance!



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    I don't know if you know this, but you can buy a pistol, just you are more limited on what you can do with it. Im 20 and I bought a used H&K USP, 9mm from a private party. One problem is buying ammunition, you cannot buy it from a FFL. But there are ways around this. :P
    Sure, you may not be able to carry it anywhere but your house. However it also gives you time to get good with it.

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    Welcome to the board.

    Ultimately, the holster will beyour preferencebut as far as hip holsters and bikesI sometimes ride my bike with a hip holster and it doesn't seem to be a problem.

    If you like revolvers you may also consider a modern double action revolver.Capacity though will typically be limited to 6-8 shots though. Most of them can be cocked into single action mode but have the advantage of firingdouble action to so you don't need to cock the hammer back.

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    I'm quite fond of my Smith & Wesson M&P 45. 10 in the clip, one in the tube, safety on the trigger, in a BlackHawk CQC hip holster. Gun runs new at 550 around me, holster about 40. 4.25, 4.5 and 5 inch barrels available. Polymer frame, picatinny rail up front. The slide is coated stainless steel, I think the barrel is too. Rust has yet to be an option. The 9mm variant holds 17 + 1 for about 515 new.

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    Regular Member VAopencarry's Avatar
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    Check your state laws. It is quite possible that you can legally own a handgun, just not buy one from an FFL Dealer. You could receive one as a Birthday gift or the like.

    The revolvers you speak of are generally called Cowboy guns or single action only.

    If I go for a more modern gun, I'm set on a .45. And am liking a lot of the Kimber 1911's
    Sorry I found this funny. You know why it's called a 1911?


    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants." - Thomas Jefferson

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    VAopencarry wrote:
    Sorry I found this funny. You know why it's called a 1911?
    Heheh, it still makes it more modern than cowboy pistols though, right?

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    Wow, I'm surprised this didn't turn into a (poo) storm.

    I'll back the 1911 and the XD, though. If you like steel frames, go 1911. If you like polymer, XD.

    I have both. :celebrate
    Why open carry? Because 1911 > 911.

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    Regular Member shad0wfax's Avatar
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    If you like 1911's and like the Kimbers, I'd check out the Crimson Pro Carry II and the Crimson Custom Carry II. They're about $850, have aluminum framces and a very neat fitting crimson trace laser grip included from the factory. (If you buy one seperately, the laser grips are bulkier and it will cost you more.)

    If you like polymers and want a .45 auto the Springfield XDs and HK USP's are a great option.

    I'm a big fan of carrying a 3" barrel 5-shot revolver chambered in .357 magnum. I like one that does have a hammer and can be fired double-action. The Smith & Wesson J-Frames and the Ruger SP101 are two examples that fit the bill.

    Don't forget that daily carry guns (especially if you concealed carry) are subject to quite a bit more sweat and moisture than other firearms and stainless steel is a very desirable feature for a daily carry gun, if it's available.


    EDIT: Wow I said double-auto instead of double-action and no one even caught it... It's fixed now.

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    I'm liking the USP. Of you USP owners how's the accuracy, recoil, upkeep of the gun?


    Also thank you everyone who replied. :]

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    It can shoot way better than I can, as my first pistol. Recoil is negligable, although we are talking about 9mm here. Field stripping it is cake. Ive seen it field stripped and reassembled, blindfolded on youtube. :P
    If you are ever going to be on the other side, around Moses Hole, let me know, Ill let you shoot it.

  11. #11
    Regular Member shad0wfax's Avatar
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    Audioautomatica wrote:
    I'm liking the USP. Of you USP owners how's the accuracy, recoil, upkeep of the gun?


    Also thank you everyone who replied. :]
    The USPs are all very durable and extremely reliableeven for daily carry guns in harsh conditions. They're known to be more very accurate firearms. In terms of accuracy, they're rated in descending order:


    1. Mark 23 Mod 0 (threaded o-ring barrel & match trigger)
    2. USP Expert (match trigger)
    3. USPTactical (threaded o-ring barrel & match trigger)
    4. USP Compact Tactical (threaded o-ring barrel & match trigger)
    5. USP
    6. USP Compact
    I could be wrong in where I placed the Expert, since it doesn't have an o-ring barrel. It does, however, have a longer barrel than the Tactical and a match trigger, so I assume it's ever so slightly more accurate.

    The triggers can be interchanged between any HK, so if you wanted a standard USP or USP Compact you could put in the match trigger from the USP Expert/Tactical series. (The Mark 23 is not interchangable, as far as I know.)

    In terms of recoil though, all of the USPs are using the same "improvedBrowning locking system" with a recoil buffer system that limits perceived recoil significantly. They function flawlessly and are extremely smooth shooters. Since they are a polymer frame (lighter weight)and the barrel is set slightly higher above your hands than on a 1911 they will have a bit more muzzle rise than a comparable barrel length 1911, but the recoil is very controllable and followup shots seem to be just as fast as full-framed guns in comparable barrel lengths using the same loads.

    The Mark 23 Mod 0passed all of the nasty tests the US SOCOM required for adoption as the new JSC: (freeze/shoot/heat cycles, salt-water mists, drop tests,6,000+ mean rounds between stoppage using+P ammunition after firing 1,000Proof Rounds, etc.) The Mark 23 was chosen as the winner for the JCP contract. Later, some of theoperators complained that it was too big.The USP Tactical was made to be a smaller replacement for the Mark 23 and has very similar features.The only real difference between the Mk 23 and the Tactical is the size, safety mechanism, and the silent decocker. The magazines for the Mk 23 can be used in a Tactical, but not vice versa. The USPs were tested harshly as well, although they weren't tested quite as severely as the Mk 23 was.

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    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    Springfeld Armory 1911-A1 gummint model .45acp (parkerized finish) No bells... whistles... nuthin' will fall off or break. SAA .45LC's are too slow to fire, unloadand reload unless you're REALLY good.

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    The USP is just sounding more and more wonderful. :]



    On the HK-usa site under the USP category it shows the USP with what appears to be a flashlight infront of the trigger? I couldn't find anything that mentioned what that was, or if the other models carried it as well. But someone here has to know.

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    There is a rail on the front. Its a HK proprietary rail design, but you can get adapters to get a standard rail. http://www.impactguns.com/store/GGG-1134SL.html

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    Does anyone know about Mauser c-96's?

    I would love to have a c-96 that I could carry.



    Whether it's Spanish, Chinese or German doesn't matter.

    Where might my best bet lay of getting my hands on one here in the northwest?



    From what I've put together top dollar is about $3000ish if the gun is genuine, and all parts have matching serial numbers. But I'm not interested in being a collector of guns that will never be shot again.

    I'm looking for a sturdy, usebal c-96.



    Also does anyone have information on parts, amuunition, smiths or accessories for the c-96?



    Also, what are the main differences between the USP tactical and the USP expert?

    And if you all had to choose between them which would you choose and why?

  16. #16
    Regular Member shad0wfax's Avatar
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    Audioautomatica wrote:
    Also, what are the main differences between the USP tactical and the USP expert?

    And if you all had to choose between them which would you choose and why?
    HK USP Expert: 5.19" barrel, match trigger,adjustable precisionsight.

    HK USP Tactical: 5.09" barrel, match trigger with adjustable trigger stop, o-ring barrel (increases accuracy), adjustable precision sight, and threaded barrel to accept a sound suppressor. Also subjected to rather rigorous testing for combat use.

    HK USP Compact Tactical: 4.46" barrel, others same as full-sized tactical, but no testing listed.

    Basically, the only real difference between the expert and tacticalis the threaded barrel on the tactical and the o-ring barrel on the tactical. Both are supposed to be excellent shooters in terms of accuracy. I wanted to buy a HK Mk 23 Mod. 0, but I couldn't find any that were available other than at high-reserve auctions online. I settled on the the USP Tactical(the full size, not Compact) because I wanted the superb accuracy,needed the threaded barrel anddidn't mind having a large pistol.

    What's good for one firearm owner isn't necessarily good for another. You may find you prefer a 1911, a Glock, a Springfield Armory, a Smith&Wesson, a Sig Sauer, a Kel-Tec, a Ruger, a Taurus, a Colt, or any other handgun. There are many fine revolvers, steel-framed autos, and polymer-framed autos to choose from.

    It sounds like you have plenty of time to decide, so what I would do is answer these questions:

    • Will I be shooting the firearm often?
    • Will I be carrying the firearm often?
    • If I'm going to carry openly, is it comfortable to do so?
    • If I'm going to carry concealed, is the firearm concealable?
    • What is my price range?
    • Do I want a pistol or a revolver?
    • If the firearm is for self-defense, what is the weather like where I live? (In other words, are people wearing alot of heavy clothing when it gets cold, or is it always shorts and t-shirt weather? This question helps you narrow down the next question, which is important.
    • What caliber do I want?
    • Can I operate the firearm well? (This means not only shoot well, but also reload, draw, holster, and carry well.) This is probably the most important question. If you haven't actually fired the gun at a range, you shouldn't buy it on a whim.

    You have to know the answer to each one of these questions and weigh each question according to your own personal priorities. I can't stress the importance of the last question enough, so I'll rephrase it with a statement. You should definitely try out each firearm you're considering on purchasing at a gun-store that allows you to do so. If you can't find one in your area, drive the distance necessary to find one that can accomodate you.

    If you're planning to carry in deep concealment, rarely open-carry, rarely fire the weapon at a range, and are on a very tight budget, then perhaps a Kel-Tec PF-9 is your best option. They're fairly reliable with the right ammunition, very inexpensive, accurate enough to defend yourself, and extremely easy to conceal. It's a 9mm so it's adequate for personal defense, but perhaps not the best thing for a cold-weather climate where people wear a great deal of heavy clothing. It's not a firearm that's made to be cycled tens of thousands of times, so if you do a great deal of shooting it's not the pistol to use. It's strictly a concealment pistol, really.

    If you're planning to open-carry most of the time, fire the weapon very often at the range, and have a larger budget, then perhaps a nice full-sized1911 with a match-grade barrel, adjustable sights and custom grips is the thing for you. Or maybe an HK like I mentioned above is more your style. Then again, a nice S&WJ-frame (if you may have to conceal) orK-frame (larger)revolver in .357 magnum might be ideal. Don't overlook Ruger, Taurus, and other brands of revolvers either. They perform well and cost less than a Smith.

    If you live in bear country and need a firearm that not only can protect you from people but also big furry critters with sharp teeth and claws, maybe a .44 mag (or larger) revolver is something you should consider. Revolvers have nearly flawless reliability, whereas some autos can be somewhat finicky with ammunition.

    There are so many variables, only you'll know enough to narrow it down to a half-dozen or so guns that seem to fit the bill. Once you've done that, you should try each one and pick the one you can operate the best. (Again, that means shoot, draw, holster, reload, and carry the best.)

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    You're going to die of anticipation if you wait until 21 to buy it. Like someone mentioned, check your state laws you might be able to possess a handgun at 18, just have to buy it privately.

    unless you want to wait that long, I know I can't

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    Regular Member KansasMustang's Avatar
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    The .45 cal pistols you referred to are called SAA .45's (Single Action Army) and were the most modern at that time. Put out by Colonel Colt . The 1911's are called that because they were introduced into the Army inventory as the M1911 in .45 ACP. during the Phillipine insurrection. At that time the issue pistol was a .38 cal. The Maori tribesman that were actin up would get all juiced up on drugs, wrap their bodies with vines and such and charge right through .38 cal fire. But the 1911's would knock em on their collective asses.
    IF you really think you need a Kimber, by all means buy one, they're a dandy gun. Myself I think you're just payin for the name. Personally I love my Springfield XD 45.
    Laws that forbid the carrying of arms... disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes... Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man. Thomas Jefferson

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