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Thread: Kop Busters

  1. #1
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    I couldn't believe reading this story coming from Texas. Cops get caught which possibly could be a situation of police lying on affidavits to get probable cause.

    http://www.rawstory.com/news/2008/Ex...ters_1206.html

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    Regular Member sraacke's Avatar
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    FRACKING SWEEEETT!!! Who Watches The Watchmen?
    President/ Founding Member
    Louisiana Open Carry Awareness League
    www.laopencarry.org

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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    I can almost see the vains exploding in someones head now.

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    And who says you can't smoke a christmas tree. I'm shure it will work
    unless you forget to inhale, although I guess the needles will rip the papers.

    Of course they have sentenced people for cocain, when they buy/sell baking soda,
    so I hope the lawyer has a very good alibi when the trees were planted./harvested.


    Shame they couln't wing one of the intruders, with a bullet hole in a couple of them,
    they would have a harder time destoying the evidence, and sweeping it under the rug.





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    This might possibly be the greatest thing I have ever seen:shock:

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    yale wrote:
    FRACKING SWEEEETT!!! Who Watches The Watchmen?
    "Fracking"? I know what you watched too much of, 'Buck Rogers in the Twenty-first Century'. To infinity and beyond!

  7. #7
    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    I've decided I like Barry Cooper, even if he has some strange ideas about Lincoln. +1

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    Campaign Veteran T Dubya's Avatar
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    nitrovic wrote:
    Cooper is an idiot. He is in it for the money. He knows a bunch of ignorant pot heads and drug dealers will buy his tapes. The only thing useful and informative in his tapes is the part about k-9's, otherwise useless. Most officers don't use "FLIR", he's such a moron.
    Don't feed the troll!




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    SlackwareRobert wrote:
    Of course they have sentenced people for cocain, when they buy/sell baking soda
    Well, that's intent to buy. It's not like those folks were busted walking home with a box of Arm & Hammer. Which brings up another question, should attempting and failing at committing a crime be a crime? And I'm not talking about thinking about or even planning to commit a crime, I'm talking about someone who was actually trying but for whatever reason didn't quite make it.

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    FogRider wrote:
    should attempting and failing at committing a crime be a crime? And I'm not talking about thinking about or even planning to commit a crime, I'm talking about someone who was actually trying but for whatever reason didn't quite make it.
    I always thought stupidity should be a capital offense, personally. Fortunately, natural selection normally takes care of that for us.

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    Founder's Club Member Hawkflyer's Avatar
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    buster81 wrote:
    I can almost see the vains exploding in someones head now.
    +1


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    "FLIR" is so Seventies.

    Here's an interesting tidbit,
    In 2001, the United States Supreme Court decided that performing FLIR surveillance of private property without a search warrant by law enforcement violates the Fourth Amendment's protection from unreasonable searches and seizures. Kyllo v. United States, 533 U.S. 27 (2001)

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    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    FogRider wrote:
    SlackwareRobert wrote:
    Of course they have sentenced people for cocain, when they buy/sell baking soda
    Well, that's intent to buy. It's not like those folks were busted walking home with a box of Arm & Hammer. Which brings up another question, should attempting and failing at committing a crime be a crime? And I'm not talking about thinking about or even planning to commit a crime, I'm talking about someone who was actually trying but for whatever reason didn't quite make it.
    Well, seeing as the sale of drugs represents a nonaggressive transfer of goods between two consenting adults using their own personal property, and is thus far from a criminal act, I fail to see how the state has any moral, ethical, or legal (by common law) justification for its criminal actions toward the drug dealers. To me, it seems that a person who hasn't even managed to make the drugs yet is even less a criminal, if that is in fact possible.

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    T Dubya wrote:
    nitrovic wrote:
    Cooper is an idiot. He is in it for the money. He knows a bunch of ignorant pot heads and drug dealers will buy his tapes. The only thing useful and informative in his tapes is the part about k-9's, otherwise useless. Most officers don't use "FLIR", he's such a moron.
    *Don't feed the troll!

    *

    *
    What troll are you referencing?

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    SlackwareRobert wrote:
    And who says you can't smoke a christmas tree.* I'm shure it will work
    unless you forget to inhale, although I guess the needles will rip the papers.

    Of course they have sentenced people for cocain, when they buy/sell baking soda,
    so I hope the lawyer has a very good alibi when the trees were planted./harvested.


    Shame they couln't wing one of the intruders, with a bullet hole in a couple of them,
    they would have a harder time destoying the evidence, and sweeping it under the rug.



    Are you implying they should have shot one of the police officers?

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    [

  18. #18
    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    Well, vic, I would have to say that might be the only case where the government is justified in prosecuting drug dealers.

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    marshaul wrote:
    Well, seeing as the sale of drugs represents a nonaggressive transfer of goods between two consenting adults using their own personal property, and is thus far from a criminal act, I fail to see how the state has any moral, ethical, or legal (by common law) justification for its criminal actions toward the drug dealers. To me, it seems that a person who hasn't even managed to make the drugs yet is even less a criminal, if that is in fact possible.
    It depends on if the drugs are legal to posses/sell. Whether or not they should be illegal is completely besides the point here.

  20. #20
    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    You obviously didn't read my post carefully enough. The only law I referenced was common law (which for me also assumes natural law).

  21. #21
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    I agree with you that it should be that way, but I have to deal with the realities of Colorado law, which says I can't legally posses Cocaine. If we're talking hypotheticals, that's fine, but I'd like to know.

  22. #22
    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    The criminality of a drug dealer is de facto, that of the LEO who arrests him de jure. Which violates the higher authority?

  23. #23
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    You lost me. Rephrase?

  24. #24
    Campaign Veteran marshaul's Avatar
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    The criminality of a drug dealer is a de facto reality. The criminality of the state who prosecutes him in violation of his constitutional and natural rights is no less real, but it is de jure rather than de facto. I personally find the latter to be in violation of the greater authority, and thus "criminal" to a greater degree.

  25. #25
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    Thanks, wicked cognitive flatulence tonight. I think I agree with you though.

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