Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34

Thread: pulled over armed

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Plainville, CT, ,
    Posts
    120

    Post imported post

    If you get pulled over in CT are you legally obligated to tell the officer that you are carrying a gun? I don't think so but i can't find anything on it anywhere. I know this is the law in a few states.

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    , Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    107

    Post imported post

    I know several law enforcement personnel, I'll get their opinions and pass them on.

  3. #3
    State Researcher Kevin Jensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Santaquin, Utah, USA
    Posts
    2,313

    Post imported post

    modelo57 wrote:
    I know several law enforcement personnel, I'll get their opinions and pass them on.
    How about fact, instead of opinion?
    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." Robert A. Heinlein

  4. #4
    Regular Member romma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southeast, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    333

    Post imported post

    There is no duty to report in CT at this time..However, if specifically asked, I would reply truthfully for obvious reasons. But ifI was pulled over for speeding, or in an accident I would keep my trap shut.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Middletown, CT, ,
    Posts
    29

    Post imported post

    romma wrote:
    There is no duty to report in CT at this time..However, if specifically asked, I would reply truthfully for obvious reasons. But ifI was pulled over for speeding, or in an accident I would keep my trap shut.
    I agree about not saying anything-right up to the point that I have to get out of the car, or reach for my license (right rear pocket, pistol righthand carry in IWB). I don't want anyone getting nervous. If there's a chance that my pistol will be seen or otherwide discovered, I'm gonna keep my hands in plain sight, notify the LEO, and ask him/her what to do next.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Plymouth, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    241

    Post imported post

    There is no requirement to notify. However, if you keep you gun in your glove box where you also keep you insurance and registration then you may want to tell the officer about a gun before you open the glove box. No need to surprise anyone.

  7. #7
    Regular Member romma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southeast, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    333

    Post imported post

    My firearm is always well concealed on my person in my control. I am as careful as can be when it comes to carry. I do hope the option for clarified open carry is the outcome of the declatory ruling that never seems to happen.I am tired of public servants and law enforcement trying to make criminals out of honest citizens that exercise their rights.

  8. #8
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    66

    Post imported post

    I was involved in an accident last month. I was carrying concealed at the time. I didn't say anything about it and the cops never asked. When they found out there were rifles in my trunk, they took it upon themselves to inspect them and check that the chambers were empty though.

    I suppose I could have tried to explain to them that I'm a victim, not a suspect - and that the incident was an automobile accident, not a shooting. And then I could have lectured them about how telling me I can't go near my own car until they've had a chance to "inspect" my rifles when I have a loaded pistol in my jacket is a little bit silly. But then I figured I'd probably be better off ignoring them and letting them be idiots. At least I got some amusement out of it.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Stratford, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    646

    Post imported post

    Thats kinda funny that they see rifles in the trunk and don't make what I would consider a logical extension that you're likely carrying also. Still, they are lowly public servants so they aren't paid for brains.

    What town was this by the way?

  10. #10
    Regular Member romma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southeast, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    333

    Post imported post

    I think at the time they realized I had rifles in the vehicle, I would have disclosed that I was carrying. Once they found that out, the cat is out of the bag.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    66

    Post imported post

    It was in Woodbridge. Someone hit my car and I went off the road into a telephone pole. They drove off, but the police caught them.

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    374

    Post imported post

    Lank wrote:
    I was involved in an accident last month. I was carrying concealed at the time. I didn't say anything about it and the cops never asked. When they found out there were rifles in my trunk, they took it upon themselves to inspect them and check that the chambers were empty though.

    I suppose I could have tried to explain to them that I'm a victim, not a suspect - and that the incident was an automobile accident, not a shooting. And then I could have lectured them about how telling me I can't go near my own car until they've had a chance to "inspect" my rifles when I have a loaded pistol in my jacket is a little bit silly. But then I figured I'd probably be better off ignoring them and letting them be idiots. At least I got some amusement out of it.
    Where do you live, and what are the laws regarding long guns in your state? I'll give you an example--here in Colorado, the law states thatwhen a long gun isin a vehicle, the chambermust be unloaded.

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Plymouth, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    241

    Post imported post

    In Connecticut shotguns and rifles must be unloaded in a vehicle.

  14. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    66

    Post imported post

    Flyer22 wrote:
    Lank wrote:
    I was involved in an accident last month. I was carrying concealed at the time. I didn't say anything about it and the cops never asked. When they found out there were rifles in my trunk, they took it upon themselves to inspect them and check that the chambers were empty though.

    I suppose I could have tried to explain to them that I'm a victim, not a suspect - and that the incident was an automobile accident, not a shooting. And then I could have lectured them about how telling me I can't go near my own car until they've had a chance to "inspect" my rifles when I have a loaded pistol in my jacket is a little bit silly. But then I figured I'd probably be better off ignoring them and letting them be idiots. At least I got some amusement out of it.
    Where do you live, and what are the laws regarding long guns in your state? I'll give you an example--here in Colorado, the law states thatwhen a long gun isin a vehicle, the chambermust be unloaded.
    My opinion is that it shouldn't matter - there was no reason to believe I was doing anything wrong. It's like when they see a gun case they just assume wrongdoing.

    There was a backpack in the trunk too, but they didn't feel the need to rifle through it looking for cocaine.

  15. #15
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Central, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    31

    Post imported post

    Being around LEO's for my entire life I offer this, If there is ANY doubt that it will show wether when getting your info or any thing tell the LEO. They never know who's in the car. Take for example the Hartford man in upstate NY who for no reason opened fire. Protect yourself and let the officer go home.

  16. #16
    Regular Member romma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southeast, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    333

    Post imported post

    Why wouldn't the officer go home? My gun is my business... I am not going to shoot the cop. Besides, I care more about me than the cop anyhow. That's just how it is.

  17. #17
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    66

    Post imported post

    ...it sounds like the final answer is:

    No, you're not obligated to say anything. But exercise good judgement based on your situation.

  18. #18
    Regular Member romma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southeast, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    333

    Post imported post

    Sounds right Lank.

  19. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    , Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    107

    Post imported post

    I spoke to a friend of mine with 30 years police service and he told me not to volunteer anything and answer all questions truthfully.

    If you are asked to step out of the car or for a "pat down" inform the officer that you are carrying and volunteer your permit (in CT).

  20. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Newington, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    82

    Post imported post

    I've heard not required. But if asked if you have one its best to start off by saying "I have a carry permit and yes sir I have a gun at xxxxxx place" more or less. Ie don't just scream out that you have a gun unless you want one in your face!

  21. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    NL County, ,
    Posts
    3

    Post imported post

    Just hand your permit to the leo w/license if it looks like you'll be getting out of the car or if it's in the glove box. Most could care less on a stop for a minor MV violation.

  22. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Old Saybrook, CT
    Posts
    469

    Post imported post

    As others have said, there's not legal obligation to tell him.

    I've had a few circumstances where I was stopped while carrying. In all but 2 cases I didnt tell him and the interaction went on as if I wasnt carrying.

    In 1 case there was a shotgun case across my back seat. He asked if there were any other weapons in the car. I told him yes, there was a revolver in my pocket for which I was licensed to carry. He reminded me to stay in the car and went back to his car. Nothing was said of it again.

    The troopers in CT can pull up your pistol permit info and pic from their mobile data terminal so there was really no need for him to ask me to produce a pistol permit.

    The second time was bad bad bad from the officers perspective. My wallet / license had been stolen from me while on a trip to Russia shortly before I was stopped for not having a current registration sticker on my license plate.

    The cop pulled me over, he had not yet run my plate through his computer. I told him that my license had been stolen, but offered to give him my pistol permit as a form of CT identification.

    He asked if I had a weapon in the car. I told him I had a Kahr in my pocket. He very politely asked me to exit the car and put my hands on the trunk.

    So now there were 2 of us standing on the side of I95 as traffic went by us. He told me he was going to reach into my pocket and retrieve the pistol.

    This was VERY VERY stupid. It became clear to me he was unfamiliar with the Kahr. A great time for a negligent discharge. He also had to get way too close to me to remove the pistol. Keep in mind, at this point all he knows it that my registration is expired and my license is missing. I could have been a bad dude. At that point it would have been very easy for me to take him out with an elbow to the face or kneck.

    Once he had the gun, he was not sure how to clear it. I instucted him to drop the mag and cycle the slide. He did that and the chambered round fell to the ground about 2 feet from my feet. He then bent over and picked it up, putting himself at great risk again.

    He asked me to get back in the car and went to his car with my gun. He ran my registration (which was current, I had forgotten to put my new windshield sticker on the car) and license. All was as it should be.

    He returned to the car and handed the Kahr to me properly (grip first, with the slide locked back) and then gave me the mag and extra round. We joked that if he wanted to be a stickler he could tow my car, but he had to give me my gun back. I was licensed to carry, but not license to drive. He didnt give me any tickets or warnings, but reminded me to replace the license as soon as possible.

    The entire time he was polite, respectful and professional. I responded in kind. Unfortunately it was also obvious that he was completely winging it when it came to dealing with a lawfully armed citizen. He put me at some risk by making me stand in the shoulder. He put himself at great risk by 1) getting me out of the car 2) retrieving my gun from my pocket 3) bending over to pick up the live round.

    I ended up sending a letter to some official in the DPS telling them of this training gap. I never heard back from anyone.

    Don
    MCS Precision - Training, Sales, Transfers, Estate Purchases

    07 FFL
    NRA Pistol and Rifle Instructor
    NRA Life Member

  23. #23
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    17

    Post imported post

    Interesting thread. I'll add my thoughts, which aren't even worth $0.02.

    My ex brother in law is a former NC State Trooper. My current brother in law is a CT state trooper.

    Both have said that one of the most dangerous situations they face is a "routine traffic stop" at night.

    Personally, I don't want some guy who is armed, a little scared and probably not especially well trained getting surprised by anything I do.

    If I get pulled over at night, before he gets to my window my dome light is on, my wallet on the dash and my hands (both) on the wheel.

    When he/she asks for my license, reg and insurance info, I'll take my license out of my wallet along with my insureance card. I'll also give him/her my permit. If my handgun is in the glove box and I need to go there to get my reg, I'll advise him/her in advance that there is a handgun in the glove box and refer them to my permit.

    This situation is not about laws or rights. Its about safety.

    The LE you are dealing with is probably young, probably nervous. And most certainly armed.

    As always when dealing with LE, be respectful, be calm and don't surprise them.

    These thoughts have nothing to do with laws and have everything to do with dealing with an armed individual who doesn't know if you are Mother Theresa , Jack the Ripper or somewhere in between.

    In the situation the OP asked about I would rather err on the side of caution, because I sure don't want to surprise some young, dumb, scared, armed kid.


  24. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Old Saybrook, CT
    Posts
    469

    Post imported post

    You just described a great way to get shot. . . justifiably.
    ______
    If my handgun is in the glove box and I need to go there to get my reg, I'll advise him/her in advance that there is a handgun in the glove box and refer them to my permit.
    ________

    You won't be advising him of anything. If your gun is in the glovebox, there is no way a LEO is going to let you go in there.

    If you reach too fast, he has no way of knowing that you are not reaching for the gun.

    Most likely what will happen after you "advise" the officer that your gun and your paperwork are in the glovebox, is the officer will ask you to exit the car. he will then cuff you and ask your permission to go in the glovebox.

    Again, he doesn't really need to. Its all on the computer. He'll probably call for backup and put you in the second car while he runs everything.

    I have a big ethical problem with people who store firearms in their gloveboxes. With the right to carry comes the responsibility to make safeguard that weapon; to make sure it stays out of the hands of criminals and children.

    If you remove the gun from the glovebox every time you exit the vehicle, thats different. But if you leave a gun in the glovebox, you are just asking for trouble. It doesn't matter if you lock it.

    Don

    MCS Precision - Training, Sales, Transfers, Estate Purchases

    07 FFL
    NRA Pistol and Rifle Instructor
    NRA Life Member

  25. #25
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    17

    Post imported post

    Well said.

    I don't store in the glove box. My post was mostly a hypothetical response to the OP who asked about what to do if stopped. I don't store in the glove box. But many do. And yes, if you are storing in the glove box, advise the LE BEFORE you open the glove box. Give him/her PLENTY of time to ask you to step out of the car BEFORE you reach for the glove box. As an example...."Trooper, you have my pistol permit. You've asked for my reg. My reg is in the glove box. I also have a pistol in the glove box. How would you like me to proceed.?"

    My hypothetical response was based purely on things that 2 brother in laws who were also state cops have told me.

    When dealing with LE (whose mental capabilities I hold in low regard from personal experience) I always advise assuming you are dealing with an armed person who is not too bright.

    Treat them with caution. Your permit won't do you one bit of good if some poorly trained, scared, kid-cop panics and shoots you.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •