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Thread: 1 Handed Handgun Mechanics

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    I was just in the California part of the forum and readthat one of the guys there was describing how a hand injury had deadlined his gun handling and it got me thinking about how we all might handle our pistolas with only one paw.

    Things that have worked for me:

    -Racking the slide or returning a locked backslide to battery

    a. Hook the rear sight on your belt, boot heel or anything handy that the slide will grab and push the pistol forward therebymanipulating theslide.

    b. Shove the flat top of the slide straight into the meaty part of your thigh then push in and forward until the slide releases. Only really useful in returning the slide to battery but might work ok for clearing a stove pipe.

    -Magazine change

    a. Drop the magazine (sticky magazines might require a shake), drop to one knee,hold the pistol between your thigh and calf, shove in a new mag, return the slide to battery, keep fighting

    b. Drop the magazine, drop to both knees, hold the gun between your knees (mag well facing away from you), insert new mag, return slide to battery, keep fighting

    - With both of these mag change techniques, I've seen most people stand back up before they re-engage the target. I've never understood this. I've always thought it smarter to get the gun to speaking while still down on the ground and only then get back up and moving.

    -Shooting

    No big tricks here, but I find that canting my hand inboard a bit helps me cope with recoil better and if I'm working left handed, it lines the sights up in front of my right eye better.

    Now I know some folks might see some 4 rule violations here, like pointing a gun at one's self, but these are emergency measures where I seeadded risk as being acceptable. Additionally, I consider these safe techniques to practice live fire provided that one practices them dry first and always remembers to keep one's booger hook off the bang switch.

    Who else has one handed techniques to share? How about revolvers? I've never given serious thought to one hand reloading my J frame.

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    There is some one handed techniques shown in this clip:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nGIgrcgxBA

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    Good movie clip! Good execution of one handed reloads, especially the magazine shake and tooth extraction techniques. My favorite part though was Paul Newman playing sniper with a Smith Body Guard. I love those little hunchbacks.

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    I canchamber a round inmy Glock with one hand.

    I put my four fingers on the slide, as far towards the barrel as possible. My thumb goes under the backstrap, with the meaty part my thumbpad way down on the handle, near the butt.

    By pulling my fingers back, pushing my thumb down, and kinda snapping my wrist, I can chamber a round. I can do it with both hands.

    The description doesn't do it justice, I would have to demonstrate to make it clear.

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    I know exactly what your talking about. I do it to check the chamber one handed on my USP. I should see if I can chamber it..

    http://colt45.ws/vids/USPload.wmv 2.8MB WMV

    Not exactly the same, but in the same line of thought.

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    colt45ws wrote:
    I know exactly what your talking about. I do it to check the chamber one handed on my USP. I should see if I can chamber it..

    http://colt45.ws/vids/USPload.wmv 2.8MB WMV

    Not exactly the same, but in the same line of thought.
    Yeah! That's pretty much exactly it.



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    One handed reloading, especially off hand is a good idea to practice. Because when your hit, it's always the most inconvenient place, murphys law.

    I freaking love that movie. Especially the opening scene!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xsaM...eature=related

    Sarah Silverman kicks ass as the bitch who won't shut her mouth, and I love the line "Shut the c---s mouth or I'll come over there and f--- start her head"

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    eyesopened wrote:
    There is some one handed techniques shown in this clip:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nGIgrcgxBA

    These are good techniques, but who in the hell would waste so many rounds and not hit anything, aaahhhhh only hollywood.


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    marine77 wrote:
    eyesopened wrote:
    There is some one handed techniques shown in this clip:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nGIgrcgxBA

    These are good techniques, but who in the hell would waste so many rounds and not hit anything, aaahhhhh only hollywood.
    But the one guy that kept his cover, and kept his cool came out unscathed. The idiots moving from cover to cover were the ones hurt.

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    marine77 wrote:
    These are good techniques, but who in the hell would waste so many rounds and not hit anything, aaahhhhh only hollywood.
    Anyone who's done real force on force with simunitionshas experienced the frustration of shooting as well as one can and missing. Targets that shoot back and move aggressively are harder to hit than most people think. In my experience most of the hits in a sim gun fight are almost accidental and are rarely if ever placed where one truly wants them. We all know that stress degrades performance. Sim stress is pretty intense but I doubtit replicates real gun fight stress. Trainers with whom Ihave worked who have heard it from real world shootersreport back that 4-5 pistol rounds is usually just a good starting point in a gun fight and seldom a fight stopper.

    Considering this is hollywood, I'm thinking one magazine per bad guy is not toobad and pretty accurate.

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    grumpycoconut wrote:
    marine77 wrote:
    These are good techniques, but who in the hell would waste so many rounds and not hit anything, aaahhhhh only hollywood.
    Anyone who's done real force on force with simunitionshas experienced the frustration of shooting as well as one can and missing. Targets that shoot back and move aggressively are harder to hit than most people think. In my experience most of the hits in a sim gun fight are almost accidental and are rarely if ever placed where one truly wants them. We all know that stress degrades performance. Sim stress is pretty intense but I doubtit replicates real gun fight stress. Trainers with whom Ihave worked who have heard it from real world shootersreport back that 4-5 pistol rounds is usually just a good starting point in a gun fight and seldom a fight stopper.

    Considering this is hollywood, I'm thinking one magazine per bad guy is not toobad and pretty accurate.
    I've gotten so accustomed to the Rapid Deployment style of response, that I don't even think about what is coming back at me anymore. We train in that style so much at work that when we train with other agencies, they wonder why I am standing in the middle of a hallway, iscosceles stance, with no cover. And I rarely get his, as the other side is throwing bad rounds and missing...

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    superdemon wrote:
    I've gotten so accustomed to the Rapid Deployment style of response
    Please define "rapid deployment style of response". It sounds as if you trust in armor,firepower and agressionto keep you safe while you charge straight up the middle. Are you talking about the straight for the throat speed anddirectness sometimes requiredwhen working an active shooter response?

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    grumpycoconut wrote:
    superdemon wrote:
    I've gotten so accustomed to the Rapid Deployment style of response
    Please define "rapid deployment style of response". It sounds as if you trust in armor,firepower and agressionto keep you safe while you charge straight up the middle. Are you talking about the straight for the throat speed anddirectness sometimes requiredwhen working an active shooter response?
    It's not "sometimes" required, it's just how it is done now.

    "Rapid Deployment", very generally, is this..

    1. First unit to get to an active shooter (such as a school shooter) situation goes in with the gear he has. If you are lucky enough to have an AR or a Mossberg in the trunk, you grab it and go. If it is just one of you, then you go. If you are lucky enough for two or three to get there at the same time, you go in. No time to stop and posse up in the parking lot putting on flak jackets, helmets, and crap. No waiting for SWAT or a CRU, either.

    2. It is constant, rapid movement towards the sound of the gunshots. No duck and cover crap. Run up the hallway as fast as you can accurately shoot. We are drilled that each gunshot is a child dying, so get your ass there.

    3. You don't stop and render aid to anyone who is injured.

    4. Eliminate the target, or pin the target in a room with no hostages. If you can pin the target in a clean room, then you can get yourself to cover where you can still cover the room, and wait for backup.

    5. If the target is in a room with hostages, and still firing, you go in wrap-around style, and take them out before they take you out or any more hostages.

    So yeah. It's not faith in armor or anything like that, it's the knowledge that through training, experience and skill, you should be able to out-shoot some kid with his dad's hunting rifle.

    Speed, surprise, and force of aggression.

    Lots of people will lock up when you come running up the hallway like a madman.



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    That level of speed and agression are excellent tactics when the situation calls for them but they have limited application and very highpotentialbutcher's billsthat you need to be willing to pay. I believe, like you do, that insome situations speed and violence of action can carry the day, but one must guard against the tendancy to use that particularhammer in all situations.

    SWAT and other teams still use crash and dash tactics on a daily basis butthe vast majority of situations can be best resolved with other approaches. The team that I was on practiceddynamic entries until we could clear/secure a 2000sq/ft, multi story house in under 15 seconds, but the majority of our real world work was done in the surround and call out style. We would then follow up with a slow and deliberate covert insertion and clear that depended on a carefull "inches and angles" approach. Even if the target was known to be heavliy armed and violent, our guiding logic was that time solves all problems. There is seldom reason to force a fight that doesn't need forcing. 999 times out of 1000 bad guys quit when they know that they have no other viable options and they aren't startled into a bad response. This samedeliberate approach was also our stock in trade in patrol. You could say that fools rush in where angels sneak and snipe.

    LEOs and soldiers get paid and are expected to run to the sound of the guns. That puts them in a different category all together. Of course most folks aren't hunters of men and will never have call to useany of the tools described above. Most folks who do have to resort to gun fighting skills will be on their own in their own houses or on the street where what's needed when things fall in the bucket is a strong static defense or a fightingwithdrawal.

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    grumpycoconut wrote:
    That level of speed and agression are excellent tactics when the situation calls for them but they have limited application and very highpotentialbutcher's billsthat you need to be willing to pay. I believe, like you do, that insome situations speed and violence of action can carry the day, but one must guard against the tendancy to use that particularhammer in all situations.

    SWAT and other teams still use crash and dash tactics on a daily basis butthe vast majority of situations can be best resolved with other approaches. The team that I was on practiceddynamic entries until we could clear/secure a 2000sq/ft, multi story house in under 15 seconds, but the majority of our real world work was done in the surround and call out style. We would then follow up with a slow and deliberate covert insertion and clear that depended on a carefull "inches and angles" approach. Even if the target was known to be heavliy armed and violent, our guiding logic was that time solves all problems. There is seldom reason to force a fight that doesn't need forcing. 999 times out of 1000 bad guys quit when they know that they have no other viable options and they aren't startled into a bad response. This samedeliberate approach was also our stock in trade in patrol. You could say that fools rush in where angels sneak and snipe.

    LEOs and soldiers get paid and are expected to run to the sound of the guns. That puts them in a different category all together. Of course most folks aren't hunters of men and will never have call to useany of the tools described above. Most folks who do have to resort to gun fighting skills will be on their own in their own houses or on the street where what's needed when things fall in the bucket is a strong static defense or a fightingwithdrawal.
    Excellent, well versed post sir.

    Are you now out of the business that put you on dynamic entries? I only ask because Rapid Deployment has only come to the forefront in the last 5 years or so, and has only really been taught widespread for the last 2 or so. I was on the first training session in the Commonwealth, 4 years ago, and it has even evolved since then.

    Of course, there will always be uses for the SWAT style of mope and creep, but Rapid Deployment is tailored more towards things like active school shooters, ala the Virginia Tech type thing. The barricaded lone subject, or the barricaded subject not actively shooting hostages does not get Rapid Deployment tactics.

    We had a guy in our class, and old-school guy, who totally did not get the concept. He was of the thinking of "protect myself first". Rapid Deployment demands that you put everyone else ahead of yourself.

    He spoke up in class, and said, "So you want us to run in on a suicide mission." The instructor looked at him, and said, "No, you're going in on a homocide mission." Our department released two officers, as they told the chief that they didn't think they could go in on their own. They said it on the record, and that was used to ask them to resign. Trust me, I never want to pull the trigger on another human being, but if I see a person pulling the trigger on kids, I most certainly will. I don't want to live with the thought of killing another human being (especially a kid), but if I have to, I most certainly will. I'd rather live with the thought that I killed one who may have killed many more, rather than wait outside for SWAT or a CRU.

    Everytime we run sims, we loose officers. We have yet to get through a sim without an officer leaving the building feet first. However, it's been pretty much proven that in real situations, the shooter will usually turn the weapon on themselves or surrender rather than fight the police.

    During a sim, our guys located and neutralized a subject in a 40,000 square foot building in a one minute thirty seven seconds from the time we breached the door. That is running full-tilt-boogie and still being able to shoot accurately.

    Rapid Deployment has yet to be used to neutralize and actual active shooter, so it remains to be seen if it is truly effective. I suppose that you could count the Alrose Villa shooting in Columbus, OH as a Rapid Deployment incident, and it was extremely effective, even though there was some slight staging of the crew before they went in.





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    "Rapid Deployment", Active Shooter Response", call it what you want, has been around a bit longer than you are familiar with. It was a response to the 1999 Columbine HS shooting. NTOA, CATO (Cal. Assoc. of Tactical Ofc.) and others started teaching it within a year of Columbine.

    Its been evolving from day one. I was first taught to use a 4 mandiamond formation. Of course this was modifiable as the numbers of available shooters dictated, but the idea of a solo hunterwas pretty quickly dismissed. 2 man hunter elements were about the minimum deemed effective. Of course in the LA area you have access to a seemingly endless number of cops when things go bad.

    The only active shooter incident I know of that was stopped by a lone officer was the 2001 Santana HS shooting. In that one there just happened to be an officer on campus (can't recall is he was on or off duty) when things went bad. He cornered the shooter in a bathroom and bunkered down until help came. Despite his immediate action that one still resulted in 2 dead and 13 wounded.

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    The last training session I went to, we went in solo, 2 man, 3 man, and 4 man. It has evolved to the point of not waiting for the 4 man team to show up. If you get out of your car, and you hear shots, you go in. They may have initially dismissed solo missions, but we are now actively teaching it.

    Of course, one man going in is not "Plan A", but it is what it is.

    I realize RD was a response to Columbine, but you didn't see it as part of LEO basic training until about 5 years ago in this area. It was an option for in-service training in 2001 here.



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    It looks like the tactics training pendulum has swung to the other extreme. At the risk of sounding like a Cassandra, its conceivable that some young hot shot is going to be added to the FBI's LEOKA study because he charged into a liqour store robbery or DV incident before he had cover officers because he was taught to charge in under one specific set of circumstances and he over generalized.

    One riot, One Ranger gets my testosterone pumping too but I'm no superhero. Fight smart, fight effective, stack the deck in you favor every chance you get.

    Remenber the rules of gun fighting!!! 1. Bring a gun 2. Bring a friend with a gun

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    grumpycoconut wrote:
    Fight smart, fight effective, stack the deck in you favor every chance you get.
    exactly!

    as our drill SGT used to say... "if you aint cheating you aint winning"

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    superdemon wrote:
    grumpycoconut wrote:
    That level of speed and agression are excellent tactics when the situation calls for them but they have limited application and very highpotentialbutcher's billsthat you need to be willing to pay. I believe, like you do, that insome situations speed and violence of action can carry the day, but one must guard against the tendancy to use that particularhammer in all situations.

    SWAT and other teams still use crash and dash tactics on a daily basis butthe vast majority of situations can be best resolved with other approaches. The team that I was on practiceddynamic entries until we could clear/secure a 2000sq/ft, multi story house in under 15 seconds, but the majority of our real world work was done in the surround and call out style. We would then follow up with a slow and deliberate covert insertion and clear that depended on a carefull "inches and angles" approach. Even if the target was known to be heavliy armed and violent, our guiding logic was that time solves all problems. There is seldom reason to force a fight that doesn't need forcing. 999 times out of 1000 bad guys quit when they know that they have no other viable options and they aren't startled into a bad response. This samedeliberate approach was also our stock in trade in patrol. You could say that fools rush in where angels sneak and snipe.

    LEOs and soldiers get paid and are expected to run to the sound of the guns. That puts them in a different category all together. Of course most folks aren't hunters of men and will never have call to useany of the tools described above. Most folks who do have to resort to gun fighting skills will be on their own in their own houses or on the street where what's needed when things fall in the bucket is a strong static defense or a fightingwithdrawal.
    Excellent, well versed post sir.

    Are you now out of the business that put you on dynamic entries? I only ask because Rapid Deployment has only come to the forefront in the last 5 years or so, and has only really been taught widespread for the last 2 or so. I was on the first training session in the Commonwealth, 4 years ago, and it has even evolved since then.

    Of course, there will always be uses for the SWAT style of mope and creep, but Rapid Deployment is tailored more towards things like active school shooters, ala the Virginia Tech type thing. The barricaded lone subject, or the barricaded subject not actively shooting hostages does not get Rapid Deployment tactics.

    We had a guy in our class, and old-school guy, who totally did not get the concept. He was of the thinking of "protect myself first". Rapid Deployment demands that you put everyone else ahead of yourself.

    He spoke up in class, and said, "So you want us to run in on a suicide mission." The instructor looked at him, and said, "No, you're going in on a homocide mission." Our department released two officers, as they told the chief that they didn't think they could go in on their own. They said it on the record, and that was used to ask them to resign. Trust me, I never want to pull the trigger on another human being, but if I see a person pulling the trigger on kids, I most certainly will. I don't want to live with the thought of killing another human being (especially a kid), but if I have to, I most certainly will. I'd rather live with the thought that I killed one who may have killed many more, rather than wait outside for SWAT or a CRU.

    Everytime we run sims, we loose officers. We have yet to get through a sim without an officer leaving the building feet first. However, it's been pretty much proven that in real situations, the shooter will usually turn the weapon on themselves or surrender rather than fight the police.

    During a sim, our guys located and neutralized a subject in a 40,000 square foot building in a one minute thirty seven seconds from the time we breached the door. That is running full-tilt-boogie and still being able to shoot accurately.

    Rapid Deployment has yet to be used to neutralize and actual active shooter, so it remains to be seen if it is truly effective. I suppose that you could count the Alrose Villa shooting in Columbus, OH as a Rapid Deployment incident, and it was extremely effective, even though there was some slight staging of the crew before they went in.



    Seems to me though that a real psycho who would be willing to do something big, and take as many as they could would be able to use that tactic to their advantage, aka boobytraps.

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    marine77 wrote:
    Seems to me though that a real psycho who would be willing to do something big, and take as many as they could would be able to use that tactic to their advantage, aka boobytraps.
    Already been done. The Columbine shooters reportedly laid out pipe bombs and the VA Tech Shooter chained up the doors to his killing ground.Smart bombers have been laying in time delayed sucker bombs aimed at killing emergency responders since the second or third time bombs were used to kill people. Alexander the Great taught us that opening ranks and giving the horses a hole torun for gives us the opportunity to flank the charioteers and kill them. Mel Gibson showedus that William Wallace proved that if you keep your pikes hidden until the heavy cavalry is too close to pull away you can kill them in job lots. Sun Tzu, VonClauswitz, Achmed the mad bomber, include your own military thinker here________, have all taught us that tactics beget counters which beget counter counters ad infinitum.

    Focusing too much on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th levels of what if can paralyze. So what's rule one for a fight? Have a plan. What's rule two? have a back up plan cause your first plan is gonna fall apart.

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    grumpycoconut wrote:
    It looks like the tactics training pendulum has swung to the other extreme. At the risk of sounding like a Cassandra, its conceivable that some young hot shot is going to be added to the FBI's LEOKA study because he charged into a liqour store robbery or DV incident before he had cover officers because he was taught to charge in under one specific set of circumstances and he over generalized.

    One riot, One Ranger gets my testosterone pumping too but I'm no superhero. Fight smart, fight effective, stack the deck in you favor every chance you get.

    Remenber the rules of gun fighting!!! 1. Bring a gun 2. Bring a friend with a gun
    Right, but that would be his tactical error.

    We are preached to only run toward gunshots (In hindsight, that seems soooooo counterintuitive...) where an active shooter is known.

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    superdemon wrote:
    grumpycoconut wrote:
    It looks like the tactics training pendulum has swung to the other extreme. At the risk of sounding like a Cassandra, its conceivable that some young hot shot is going to be added to the FBI's LEOKA study because he charged into a liqour store robbery or DV incident before he had cover officers because he was taught to charge in under one specific set of circumstances and he over generalized.

    One riot, One Ranger gets my testosterone pumping too but I'm no superhero. Fight smart, fight effective, stack the deck in you favor every chance you get.

    Remenber the rules of gun fighting!!! 1. Bring a gun 2. Bring a friend with a gun
    Right, but that would be his tactical error.

    We are preached to only run toward gunshots (In hindsight, that seems soooooo counterintuitive...) where an active shooter is known.
    That's what we were taught in the corps, when ambushed, do the unexpected, rush them.

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    grumpycoconut wrote:
    I was just in the California part of the forum and readthat one of the guys there was describing how a hand injury had deadlined his gun handling and it got me thinking about how we all might handle our pistolas with only one paw.

    Things that have worked for me:

    -Racking the slide or returning a locked backslide to battery

    a. Hook the rear sight on your belt, boot heel or anything handy that the slide will grab and push the pistol forward therebymanipulating theslide.

    b. Shove the flat top of the slide straight into the meaty part of your thigh then push in and forward until the slide releases. Only really useful in returning the slide to battery but might work ok for clearing a stove pipe.

    -Magazine change

    a. Drop the magazine (sticky magazines might require a shake), drop to one knee,hold the pistol between your thigh and calf, shove in a new mag, return the slide to battery, keep fighting

    b. Drop the magazine, drop to both knees, hold the gun between your knees (mag well facing away from you), insert new mag, return slide to battery, keep fighting

    - With both of these mag change techniques, I've seen most people stand back up before they re-engage the target. I've never understood this. I've always thought it smarter to get the gun to speaking while still down on the ground and only then get back up and moving.

    -Shooting

    No big tricks here, but I find that canting my hand inboard a bit helps me cope with recoil better and if I'm working left handed, it lines the sights up in front of my right eye better.

    Now I know some folks might see some 4 rule violations here, like pointing a gun at one's self, but these are emergency measures where I seeadded risk as being acceptable. Additionally, I consider these safe techniques to practice live fire provided that one practices them dry first and always remembers to keep one's booger hook off the bang switch.

    Who else has one handed techniques to share? How about revolvers? I've never given serious thought to one hand reloading my J frame.
    MY REPLY: Let me preface my reply, I am not an LEO or highly trained Military type operator.

    I "am" a guy who has been in two 1 on 1 gun on gun shoot out's or gun fights , what ever you call them and I have also been shot at more than just those two times and shot (wounded ) multiple times, including loosing my right eye, so that does not make me a proto typical gun enthusiast nor a true indepth expert like Clint Smith or Massad Ayoob ( I dig those guys ).

    I am just someone who is "horrifically experienced" and I am the survivor ( not winner) no one wins just survives, so hows that, and with that.

    Oh and please forgive my rambling dissertation here, I am only trying to ad something over being a just a blowhard or wandering off topic.

    Most shooters don't even spend any time shooting a handgun with the "weak" hand, such as left hand if you are right handed & vise verse.

    I am as good with my left as I am with my right. even with a bolt action rifle, exept fr the lack of right eye vision when leaning over a bolt rifle, but racking and jacking rounds is good on both sides.

    One of you guys mentioned Murphy's Law, it goes beyond that into to physics, the fact is that your shooting hands are the lead element in line of sight and return fire trajectory, specially if you happen to be shooting with only one hand on the pistol it is directly in the return line of fire of your enemy.

    The enemy shoots at your body and at your flash and thus your hands are targets.

    Jumping Around A Bit: Football players on defense will tell you to watch the waist of the running back when they are wanting to make sure witch way they are gonna "move", its the last thing that will move when the body jerks into motion.

    I have noticed something, the hands when below the waist are also good to watch "before" a joker tries to pull out his 9mm ace card and shoot you.

    The hands most time are quicker than the eye, any magician can tell and show you that over & over, but most street killers don't have their hand on their gun like Jessie James of the old west.

    Street thugs most of the time dont carry their gun in a quick snatch holstered position they are usually in deep cover in there jacket / pants so I watch the waist even when they are talking to me or in the past cussing and trying to intimidate me, I learned as a kid that words dont punch you and eyes are not laswer beams but hands can kill you when they dig into a waist band.

    Back to trajectory and one hand

    The Miami FBI shootout case of 20 or so years ago will attest to this point of loosing your dominant hand in an in coming rounds fire fight with a back up shotgun that had to be pumped one handed.

    Also Your gun itself could take a mortal in coming round mechanical hit and you may be paddling in poo poo creek by hand ( something to think about )

    What do you do if you got a broken hand "and" gun ? run, yell fire, grab your knife, wrestle or fake a heart attack ?

    In that FBI shootout case there was a hapenstance opportunity & time to find cover, but that was Mini14 againts wheel gun.

    Handgun fights are mostly zero cover and "in your face" close, so time is out, there is no time to re-do, its fall back to plan B , plan C, and that does not include a tactical reload in place, its improvise on the fly and hope God loves you enough to help out.

    If you are lucky enough to be shooting against a guy or two who value there lives enough for them to grab cover themselves the one hand rack in a static place will be a go, otherwise there is obviously no time at 3 feet distance

    I practice shooting with both hands, singularly and both in tandem reversed.

    Another lessor reason to practice with both hands singularly and in tandem is that my dominant hand is also my punching aka overhand knockout hand and it is my "main" grab hand disarm and submission hold and choke hand, I practice submission, disarm with both hands of course.

    I want to grab the other guys right dominant hand that is punching me or grab his almost always right hand weapon. ( yes I punch practice with both )

    The "scenario" stuff gets more and more wild as a fight goes on beyond a few seconds into a minuet.

    1 minuet is eternity, a lonely eternity




    Even wrestling to keep my loaded gun ( I wont wrestle to keep my empty ) or wrestle to get his gun can be an extreme that could render your dominant hand useless by falling on your wrist or sustaining finger breaks in a struggle.

    If You SA is compromised for what ever reason and you find yourself in a bang vs bang you could get "locked up" with a bad guy so one should actually practice moving & counter wrestling & strikes to retain your gun with a partner and a toy gun.

    I know realism training is not reality as eye balls are great submission targets that you cannot practice.

    Never the less you must stay with the mission at hand which is to "keep your gun" while poking eyes, head butting nose, biting hand, elbowing jaw and kneeing gut & balls . or a good option of you can is to be running like the wind if possible.

    Trust me , you guys are talking about getting a round into battery with one hand, well ask yourself why do you only have one hand , how did it get that way with a handgun, well it is because your assailant f***ed up your other and now he is beating meth & whiskey fumes in your face as he jams his gun or your gun into your chest, you may very well be to close for a reload of any kind You better have a better back up plan than pitching & batting with one mit.

    RUN, its a handgun fight its close, real close run , doge and reload on the run.

    Did you double tap and then freeze to see what is happening ?, what is happening is the guy is still coming at you or still shooting ----> keep shoointing, dont double and then just stop to admire your center punches.

    Do you guys practice running zig zag to cover and re-loading with one hand lol, hard aint it,lol.

    A 20 year old street hood knows how to instantly RUN, when shots are fired they are like rabbits that know they are are being hunted they are hard as hell to hit and its hard to even know if you even hit them, so take a lesson from them and dont stand still like you do at the range.

    Even the act of ducking is not staying still, watch any liquor store shootout and there is ducking like crazy, the statc O.K Coral it aint.

    Range target shooting is anti gun fight training, it will teach you to "freeze" to be a target yourself.

    In some way or another you should be only temporaraly slowed, myself I have never stopped when the starting gun ( mine or his ) is sounded I am moving baby, shoot shoot move shoot shoot cover shoot shoot shoot move.

    The 20 year old weight lifting ex con Meth biker freak with Jack Daniels bravery and Jack the Ripper attitude aint gona give up easily or he would not be wrestling with you now "after" you double shot him right between the y and D in Harley Davidson on his Tee shirt in the 1st place now that he closed the distance ( ala wounded Cape Buffalo or Grizzly ) He has line backer tackled you in the 2st place.
    ( reliving the nightmare )

    I Digress: Most civilian gun owners are not physically intimidating ( like me ) nor in great so called "fighting" shape ( I try to be ) and an assailant on Meth , Crack or with absolutely nothing to lose can survive your " double tap" and its an ultra short distance of a couple seconds of closing the gap and be on you in a split second trying to get you to actually swallow your own gun "as" he is dying.

    Granted "switching" on purpose this is really not recommended for most or even warranted in a shooting situation, it is a back up ideal of my own volition , none the less being as "ambi" as possible , carrying a knife and being a well rounded fighter is the best way to be fully prepped for Mean Mr Murphy .

    I hope this added value to this one handed thread

  25. #25
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    Damn Steve. Yours is the kind of experience that is entirely too rarely heardin most gun circles. Congrats on being perforated and still being around to tell the story. Extra congrats and many many thanks for being willing to tell us about it.

    You are absolutely right about why you need to train to fight with both hands. In cop gun training circles its even got a nice little label, "Weapon Fixation." We look at the thing that can hurt us and bullets follow eyes. I can't tell you how many times i've been shot in the knuckles and fingers with sims during force on force. I can tell you that those hits out number solid torso or head hits.

    The rest of your post about real life zombies and how hard they are to put down is something that someone should sticky and highlight with big flashing arrows so that all the armchair gunfighters can get a glimpse of bloody reality.

    Whatever situation you were in that put you muzzle to muzzle not once but twice must have been a stone bitch and I hope that you've found a more peaceful place.

    Thanks again and big respect.

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