Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Making the most out of "traget practice"

  1. #1
    Campaign Veteran
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SOuth Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    503

    Post imported post

    My current condition only allows me to target practice once or twice a month. I am working my way through college right now so I am limited in money. I am 19 and the local gun range doesn't allow anyone under 21 to shoot a pistol there, so I have to go up north to shoot on public land. I don't have enough money to go to training, but I want to make the best of my shooting time! I am using cheap ammo like CCI brass and Wolf through the Glock 22 to practice. What excersises can I utilize at home or while shooting, what should I key my focus on as an open carrier? I hope that some CCW trainers or more experienced shooters can help me out, with links to websites or what not.



    Ben

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Manhattan, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    309

    Post imported post

    1. Make sure the firearm is empty.
    2. Make sure the firearm is empty.
    3. Make sure the firearm is empty.
    4. After ensuring the firearm is clear, practice dry firing.

    Dry firing is probably the best way you can get the most practice without having to go to the range. It won't damage a centerfire firearm, and it helps work the muscle memory for good trigger control.

  3. #3
    Guest

    Post imported post

    Dry-Fire practice, mannnn.... Make sure you dont "sweep" any part of your body with the barrel off the firearm. Practice getting your grip on the gun CORRECTLY without having to readjust anything....And without touching the trigger. Practice your drawing and presentation of it....WITHOUT TOUCHING THE TRIGGER.. Start very slowly; in your room at night, if you need to. With nobody around to cause a distraction. If you have roomates, make sure noone sees you "playing" with your gun.
    Check the internet for any local gun groups, many have links to (sometimes free) classes on how to handle your firearm...
    I had one NRA instructor tell me during class that 90% of practice is really "dry" practice, and no bullets really need to be fired.

    Oh, and MAKE SURE THE FIREARM IS UNLOADED. Im suprised noone had mentioned that yet.

  4. #4
    Campaign Veteran
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SOuth Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    503

    Post imported post

    Thanks guys, I have been shooting rifles/ shotguns since 10 all for hunting, but now with the pistol in the house and the possibilty of me having to defend myself, being trained is important! Any more suggestions are very welcome.



    Ben

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    83

    Post imported post

    Make sure the gun is unloaded...

    Practicing drawing and aiming is very important. Practice the 4 point draw. Clear barrel from holster, twist up (this is important just in case you need to fire from the hip), push out, aim, fire. Be aware of your trigger finger and make sure its not on the trigger as you're pulling the gun out.

    When you get proficient (muscle memory) at getting that aim true as soon as its pulled up and pointed, start firing actual bullets. Work on double taps. Then, grab some snap caps and practice clearing misfires. If you can have someone else load the magazines so you don't know where the snap caps are, even better.

    Shoot strong hand, weak hand. Do the Mozamique drill (double tap then AIMED shot to the head). Set up targets at different heights and multiple targets at different places. Practice target transitions.

    Practice shooting on the move and from different positions. Practice speed reload and tactical reload (retain magazine).

    A roll of masking tape is a good idea if you want to save on target costs, if you use the more expensive ones.

    [blur]Try shooting a bit without ear protection just so you know exactly what it sounds like.[/blur] NO! see my post below. Didn't mean shoot without ear protection, but the first time I heard a shot without them, i nearly jumped out of my skin. Was trying to say 1 or 2 shots.


    Don't go out and burn through bullets. Examine what you are doing and any corrective measures you may need to take. Ask questions too. Take pictures and/or video if you want. The more people you can have critiquing you, the better.

    Good luck and have fun!


  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Western, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    308

    Post imported post

    Here's the drill I use when I've only got an hour for the range (with a 100 round box of 9mm from Wal*Mart) ...

    1) 1" dot sheet (3 shots per dot equals 36 rounds)

    2) 25 rounds or so of draws and mix up shooting anywhere from 0-3 rounds per draw, incorporate stepping off line, verbal commands, 360 scan, tac loads.

    3) 20 rounds of shooting while moving lateral

    4) 10 rounds shooting while moving forwards and back

    5) Remaining ammo (approx. 9-10 rounds) I shoot at 25+ yards.
    Quote Originally Posted by Open Carry.org Member View Post
    I really disgree with this one! That means that we can have any yahoo running around with a gun with out the proper training. This really scares the hell out of me. Just my two-cents!
    Quote Originally Posted by KansasMustang View Post
    Joe Schmedlap out there with a loaded weapon thinking he's going to deter crime and he's not even trained to fire his weapon safely just kinda makes my hair on the back of my neck stand up.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    , Nevada, USA
    Posts
    716

    Post imported post

    madcapmag wrote:
    Try shooting a bit without ear protection just so you know exactly what it sounds like.
    PLEASE do not try this! This is one of the dumbest pieces of advice that has ever been given, right behind having someone stand a couple of feet off to the side of a target, while others in the class fired at it so that class members would get used to the sound of bullets passing close by. Yes, it has happened.

    Hearing damage is cumulative and permanent. Never practice without hearing protection.

    Most reports of actual defensive shootings that I have read have stated that the shooter didn't notice or barely noticed the sound of their own gunfire. It just isn't worth damaging your hearing over.

    The rest is all good advice.



  8. #8
    Regular Member david.ross's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Posts
    1,241

    Post imported post

    The gun range in anchorage, standing down range at 20 yd on one of the many pistol/rifle slots you can hear the bullets ricochet off the rocks. Each range slot has pebbles which are piled up to about 20-30 feet I think.

    I agree with Gordie, you're not gaining anything by shooting without hearing protection. If you shoot a high caliber gun, don't worry about the whole "fuzzing out" when you must make a shot without hearing protection. The moment passes and if you need to make additional shots you can.

    To best describe what will happen, is you won't be able to hear anything except perhaps nerves in the ear ringing which is a high pitchd sounding tone *eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee*, and it may throw off your vision for a split of a second just because you're not used to said gun without protection. There is still no benefit in shooting without hearing protection, anyone who states so is a incompetant ninny.

    Gordie wrote:
    madcapmag wrote:
    Try shooting a bit without ear protection just so you know exactly what it sounds like.
    PLEASE do not try this! This is one of the dumbest pieces of advice that has ever been given, right behind having someone stand a couple of feet off to the side of a target, while others in the class fired at it so that class members would get used to the sound of bullets passing close by. Yes, it has happened.

    Hearing damage is cumulative and permanent. Never practice without hearing protection.

    Most reports of actual defensive shootings that I have read have stated that the shooter didn't notice or barely noticed the sound of their own gunfire. It just isn't worth damaging your hearing over.

    The rest is all good advice.

    Gays are prominent members of firearm rights, we do more via the courts, don't like it? Leave.
    Religious bigots against same sex marriage are not different than white supremacists.
    I expel anti-gay people off my teams. Tolerance is key to team cohesion and team building.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    30

    Post imported post

    Wow, I cannot believe anyone would suggest shooting without ear protection.....wow.

    When we shoot our weekly drills, one of the main things we practice is lateral movement while drawing, so that it becomes part of the muscle memory. To add to that, one of us will stand slightly behind the active shooter, and upon the move command will stiff arm him on one side or the other making that lateral movement difficult, so that he has to force his way thru it before engaging whatever target. This is to simulate having to push aside a bystander, wife, gf, garbage can, etc as part of the reaction to the threat. I have to admit, the first timethey did it to me it was a definite surprise, and it added yet another bit of realism to scenario.

  10. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    83

    Post imported post

    Sorry, didn't mean practice all day and all night.

    I was trying to say a shot or two.

    Was tired and didn't come out correctly.

    Mea culpa, mea culpa...

    Shooting without hearing protection IS stupid. Practicing without eye protection IS stupid. Sorry about the bad advice.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    , South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    94

    Post imported post

    Please visit- http://www.guntalktv.com

    It's a great site.

    Another thing I might do is seek out older more experienced shooters that may help mentor you. Check with the local range and gun shops to see if they know of any clubs.

    Here in Carolinas, we have something called "Wildlife Action". There is an outdoor range; training classes and matches are also held. (At $40 "Family" membership and $25 range fee per year it's a great deal and your of age.)

    Good luck!


  12. #12
    Campaign Veteran
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SOuth Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    503

    Post imported post

    Thanks for the advice guys! Yeah like I said I would go to local ranges but I'm 19 and for some reason they have a problem with me not being 21 or older, I looked at the NRA courses but you have to be 21 to go to those courses too. I will try the drills you guys suggested, and thanks for the guntalk link. I know full well how it is to shoot without hearing protection, it's crazy how it doesn't faze your sense when you shoot at deer or other critters, your adrenaline must be pumping so much that your hearing and everything else blocks out the noise and kick of the gun.



    Ben

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Manhattan, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    309

    Post imported post

    Well, I've never really had a problem with hearing protection.

    My right side auditory nerve is dead, and my left side retains about 25% of normal hearing. I only wear earplugs to dampen the physical feeling on my eardrums.

  14. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    378

    Post imported post

    One way to ensure that the gun is truly unloaded is to use a Snap-Cap. Glocks don't need them, but it forces you to empty a magazine and load the chamber with something other than a live round.

  15. #15
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    , ,
    Posts
    31

    Post imported post

    BJA wrote:
    " I looked at the NRA courses but you have to be 21 to go to those courses too."

    Ben
    BJA, The NRA has NO age restrictions on who may take an NRA Basic Firearms Course. The State or Municipality may have an age restriction, but the NRA does not.

  16. #16
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Central, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    343

    Post imported post

    Put your rig on with your weapon LOADED. Yes, I said it. Trigger discipline MUST BE LEARNED. Keeping your finger off the trigger will keep the gun from going *BANG*, plain and simple.

    Draw 15 times. 5 times to low ready, 5 times to hip presentation, and 5 times to full presentation. Each time, scan 360 before reholstering, and learn to reholster without looking at the holster. This helps put it in muscle memory.

    When youdo get to shoot, have someone else load your magazines, and have them put at least onedummy round in the magazine. When you are shooting that magazine, when you get to the dummy round, practice the "tap and rack" technique: Strike the bottom of the magazine with the palm of your weakhand, to ensure the mag is seated, thenrack the slide back to clear the dead round, then continue firing.

    Get comfortable moving with a loaded weapon in your hand.

    Get comfortable moving and shooting at the same time.

    Get rid of your sights, or just quit using them. They will get you killed. Learn to point shoot. If the threat is far enough away from you that you have to sight the shot, you should be looking for better cover rather than taking the shot. Make an effort to put the point shot arm postion in muscle memory, so you don't have to think about it.

    Decide this next one for yourself, as there are many differing opinions out there...

    I will probably never do a tactical reload. It doesn't make sense to me. Not only does it seem like a waste of time, but now you have a magzine in your hands, that has rounds in it, that you have to finda place for. You could 1) drop it, and loose the rounds that remain in the magazine, or 2) try to find a place to stow it, which is only going to distract you further from the gunfight.

    I'm going with the third option, which is to pull the trigger until it is empty, then reload. I know that the *click* of an empty mag can come at the worst time, but I'd still rather take my chances than waste time and attention doing tactical reloads.

  17. #17
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    , Virginia, USA
    Posts
    166

    Post imported post

    Lots of advice. Some good and some BAD!

    Start out by shoot shooting at around 7 yards or less. Load up your mags with about five rounds each.

    Practice hitting your target and do not worry about speed, double taps, or moving targets.

    Focus on sight picture, alignment, grip, and trigger control. Over time it will become muscle memory and you will not need to line up your sights as you can just point and shoot and hit your target with some degree of accuracy.

    Shooting 5 rounds at a time gives you a break so you can practice getting set up again. It also helps you learn and build muscle memory for inserting that fresh mag.

    Your goal is to actually HIT the target on a consistent basis.

    Once you are good and can hit what you are shooting at you can move the target back farther, do double taps, moving targets, or incorporate drawing and shooting.

    ALWAYS wear hearing protection when you shoot. Hearing loss can and will result otherwise. Even wearing hearing protection and long term exposure to shooting will cause some hearing loss over time. No need to help the loss happen any sooner.

    Use snap caps it you are going to dry fire. You can damage the firing pin after excessive dry firing. And always be certain the gun is unloaded andammo is stored away from your gun with you dry fire. It is harder to accidentally load up a gun while side tracked if the ammo is not readily available.

  18. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    , Virginia, USA
    Posts
    166

    Post imported post

    madcapmag wrote:

    Try shooting a bit without ear protection just so you know exactly what it sounds like.
    NO! see my post below. Didn't mean shoot without ear protection, but the first time I heard a shot without them, i nearly jumped out of my skin. Was trying to say 1 or 2 shots.

    Sir, have you shot a .357 without hearing protection? How about a .44 Magnum?

    I unintentionally shot a .357 without hearing protection one time and my ears rang for an hour. This means there was temporary damage sustained. Firing additional rounds would certainly make it worse and last longer.

    There is no reason to "experience" what it sounds like. We all know it is going to be loud. During a crisis moment where we must shoot to save our livesour body is going to turn off certain things our body does.

    One thing is going to be our hearing as our brain uses this resourceto help add additional processing timehelp quickly identify what we seegoing on.

    Ever hear people say "It was like I was like time stood still" ?? That is because your brain is processing everything so quickly that it makes it appear time has slowed down. In order to do that, you may have less hearing. So you may or may not even hear the shots at that critical moment.

  19. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Central, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    343

    Post imported post

    If you are still fairly new to shooting, you can do almost all the exercises I reccomended at home.

    Get used to the mechanics of the gun and getting comfrotable with it before you worry about the actual shooting aspect of it. If you are not comfortable with a gun in your hand, you will not be able to shoot well at atll.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •