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Thread: Jury Duty hmmmm

  1. #1
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    I have been selected for jury duty. Yea. Wonder how district court in Burien feels about OC? I guessI will soon find out.

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    Please do not forget to post your experience.

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    irfner
    Read up on "Jury Nullification" and don't mention it to the judge/ lawyers during the trial. It's as important as the 2nd Amendment. It gives a jury recourse to nullifysome situations where someone may be"legally guilty" as far as the law goes butnot morally guilty cause we all would of done the same thing if we were in the person's shoes who is on trial.Like self defence , home defence situations, speeding down the road to getsomeone having a heart attack to the hospital. rj

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    Yea maybe Icould be on wo7rolla's jury.

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    irfner wrote:
    Yea maybe Icould be on wo7rolla's jury.
    Doubt you would make it through the jury selection process. First wind that you were pro-gun, they would dismiss you so fast your head would spin.

    He could sure use a friendly "peer" if it comes to trial however.

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    They will have a lock box for you to put in it in while you are in the courthouse. OC/CC doesn't matter.

    It is a King Co district court, court security is King Co. Sheriff Deputy. They know the drill, shouldn't be any problems.

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    911Boss wrote:
    They will have a lock box for you to put in it in while you are in the courthouse. OC/CC doesn't matter.

    It is a King Co district court, court security is King Co. Sheriff Deputy. They know the drill, shouldn't be any problems.
    Actually they don't know the drill quite that well. They are still insisting (at least the officer I met) that you MUST have a CPL. I will see if I can find the officers name. This was a few weeks ago when I went to get my fingerprint card for my Florida CWL done.

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    Which location?

    Yes, get the Deputy's name, then ask to speak with a supervisor.

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    911Boss wrote:
    Which location?

    Yes, get the Deputy's name, then ask to speak with a supervisor.
    Down town, 3rd street entrance.

    You would also want to factor in about 30 extra minutes for "layover time" as they are in non too much of a hurry to get you to the lock box room about 150 feet down the hall, and back through security.

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    FMCDH wrote:
    911Boss wrote:
    Which location?

    Yes, get the Deputy's name, then ask to speak with a supervisor.
    Down town, 3rd street entrance.

    You would also want to factor in about 30 extra minutes for "layover time" as they are in non too much of a hurry to get you to the lock box room about 150 feet down the hall, and back through security.
    Still, It's nice to know that the downtown Seattle courthouse has lock boxes. Last time I was there I kept my firearm in my car, because I didn't feel like sticking it in one of those plastic baggies that they used for my pepper spray.

    I just figured they used the plastic baggies for everything.

    Did they require you to present your ID?

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    diesel556 wrote:
    Still, It's nice to know that the downtown Seattle courthouse has lock boxes. Last time I was there I kept my firearm in my car, because I didn't feel like sticking it in one of those plastic baggies that they used for my pepper spray.

    I just figured they used the plastic baggies for everything.

    Did they require you to present your ID?
    They did ask for it to make sure the CPL I gave them was mine, but they didn't record anything until they took me to the back office where they have their lock boxes.

    They take the make and model number of the gun along with your name and put it in a binder on a page with your name on it. When you put your gun in the lock box, they have you sign that it was secured, then have you sign it back out when you go to get it.

    They didn't take the SN of the gun, or any license numbers or info of that sort, and it never left the holster, nor did they ever have direct control over my pistol as the key was given to me after I locked it up. My ID was not locked up with the gun, it was given back to me after they recorded my name and contact information from it.



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    FMCDH wrote:
    They take the make and model number of the gun along with your name and put it in a binder on a page with your name on it. When you put your gun in the lock box, they have you sign that it was secured, then have you sign it back out when you go to get it.
    Interesting.

    Given that you are provided with the key, I don't understand the need for the log (unless they have a negligent number of master keys distributed to the deputies).

    It concerns me that they record your name, as it is a given that someone has a master key.

    I wonder if they would require an ID for an openly carried firearm?

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    diesel556 wrote:
    I wonder if they would require an ID for an openly carried firearm?
    I didn't test that because it was cold and I was CCing that day. From the statement of the sheriffs deputy that was assigned to the security post, I think that particular deputy would have asked for it regardless.



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    I used to have to go into the King County Courthouse building on a fairly regular basis, maybe once a week for a year. Only once was I ever hassled - and of course it was by someone who was new or filling in that day. I asked one of the regular guards about how they all felt about it - big surprise... "we're just like everyone else - some support gun rights, others don't."

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    Sasquatch wrote:
    I used to have to go into the King County Courthouse building on a fairly regular basis, maybe once a week for a year. Only once was I ever hassled - and of course it was by someone who was new or filling in that day. I asked one of the regular guards about how they all felt about it - big surprise... "we're just like everyone else - some support gun rights, others don't."
    Let me make clear that I was not "hassled" just in case you got that impression. The deputy was professional and courteously detached at all times, and that was before I flashed him my CG ID to let him relax with me, which he visibly did when he saw it.

    He even made small talk with me while he escorted me back to the exit after I had picked up my pistol to leave. In my opinion, I don't think he was attempting to be a dick in any way when he asked for my CPL, I just think he didn't know any better.

    I am partly to blame for not challenging the errors of the CPL procedure, but I was more worried about getting my business done in an expedient manner at the fingerprinting office before it closed.

    In truth, because I was CCing, he could have requested to see it for that reason alone, but that is NOT the context of why he asked for it. He made it clear by his words that it was required as a stipulation to allow me to check my firearm with him.

    Hope that clears any misunderstanding that anyone may have had.

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    What is to challenge for you FMCDH? You were cc'ing and a CPL is required to be in your possession at all times when you cc. The majority of the issues others have had is being asked for a CPL during OC which is not required under law.
    "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity."

    "though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for I know that you are by my side" Glock 23:40

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    joeroket wrote:
    What is to challenge for you FMCDH? You were cc'ing and a CPL is required to be in your possession at all times when you cc. The majority of the issues others have had is being asked for a CPL during OC which is not required under law.
    See paragraph #4 from the previous post.

    And no, the majority of issues others have had is being asked for a CPL just to check their firearm period, OC or CC.

    Its not required for either scenario.



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    FMCDH wrote:
    joeroket wrote:
    What is to challenge for you FMCDH? You were cc'ing and a CPL is required to be in your possession at all times when you cc. The majority of the issues others have had is being asked for a CPL during OC which is not required under law.
    See paragraph #4 from the previous post.

    And no, the majority of issues others have had is being asked for a CPL just to check their firearm period, OC or CC.

    Its not required for either scenario.

    I see your point but I do not agree that you have an argument based on the CPL request. You may have an argument on the ID request though.
    "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity."

    "though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for I know that you are by my side" Glock 23:40

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    rjmorel wrote:
    irfner
    Read up on "Jury Nullification" and don't mention it to the judge/ lawyers during the trial. It's as important as the 2nd Amendment. It gives a jury recourse to nullifysome situations where someone may be"legally guilty" as far as the law goes butnot morally guilty cause we all would of done the same thing if we were in the person's shoes who is on trial.Like self defence , home defence situations, speeding down the road to getsomeone having a heart attack to the hospital. rj
    Self-defense is not jury nullification, it isa legally recognized defense. Speeding to get someone to the hospital is also a legally recognized defense, it falls under choice of evils.

    Nullification is when the person is guilty, and has no legally recognized defense, but is nevertheless found not guilty, because the jury does not agree with the law that is being enforced, or perhaps with the way it is being used in a particular case.

  20. #20
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    "Self-defense is not jury nullification, it isa legally recognized defense. Speeding to get someone to the hospital is also a legally recognized defense, it falls under choice of evils.

    Nullification is when the person is guilty, and has no legally recognized defense, but is nevertheless found not guilty, because the jury does not agree with the law that is being enforced, or perhaps with the way it is being used in a particular case."



    Nice summarization. It is an important distinction, and one that more people need to be aware of. However, it is a power to be used sparingly and only in good conscience, not merely to subvert the system. The majority of people who end up in court in a criminal trial have solid evidence against them, on charges that almost anyone would agree are wrong. The people who end up on drug charges often have a history of other offences and the drug charges are a pile-on to get a bad guy off the street for a little longer.
    Be prepared. Be very prepared.

    http://swwsurplus.com/ *** 2519 E Fourth Plain Blvd Vancouver WA 98661 *** 360.314.6687
    http://www.facebook.com/SouthWestWashingtonSurplus *** https://twitter.com/SWWSurplus

  21. #21
    Regular Member Gene Beasley's Avatar
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    Interesting read on an appellate opinion published today regarding jury nullification. Take from it what you will. If your aim is to not get stuck on a trial, or to hear a trial; useful info:

    http://forum.nwcdl.org/index.php?act...;sa=view;id=44

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