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Thread: Simlar to Ryan Frederick case, but cops charged with manslaughter

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    I just came across this story. It seems very similar to the Ryan Frederick case, except the police actually got convicted.

    I still don't understand why here in Virginia Ryan is in jail while the police that participated in the raid are free.

    http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/met...entencing.html

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    Regular Member Thundar's Avatar
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    scarletwahoo wrote:
    I still don't understand why here in Virginia Ryan is in jail while the police that participated in the raid are free.
    You assume an even playing field. Virginia, and most of America,are far from that.
    He wore his gun outside his pants for all the honest world to see. Pancho & Lefty

    The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us....There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! ...The war is inevitable–and let it come! I repeat it, Sir, let it come …………. PATRICK HENRY speech 1776

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    Even still, they got off light. They should have been convicted of felony murder and gotten the death penalty.
    --- Gun control: The theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists.

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    scarletwahoo wrote:
    I just came across this story. It seems very similar to the Ryan Frederick case, except the police actually got convicted.

    I still don't understand why here in Virginia Ryan is in jail while the police that participated in the raid are free.

    http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/met...entencing.html
    Because the police in the Frederick case did not kill him and then plant drugs in the home to cover their tracks, and then lie about everything to investigators. The cases are only superficialy similar in the begining and then change course completly.-Jay

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    Agreed.


    Shooting back when fired upon is not murder in my book.

    I believe the element of murder requires some preparatory act. They did not go there to kill the occupant. They wanted to search a search warrant.

    Their problem is that they did some bad paper to get the warrant and then tried to cover up the event afterward.

    Even in Ryan's case it was not murder. Was he wrong? That is open for debate. But in both cases... certainly not murder.

    The jury ruled and both agreed to the same. Manslaughter! Rightfully so.

    And there is no "misdemeanor" murder either.

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    LEO 229 wrote:
    Agreed.


    Shooting back when fired upon is not murder in my book.

    I believe the element of murder requires some preparatory act. They did not go there to kill the occupant. They wanted to search a search warrant.

    Their problem is that they did some bad paper to get the warrant and then tried to cover up the event afterward.

    Even in Ryan's case it was not murder. Was he wrong? That is open for debate. But in both cases... certainly not murder.

    The jury ruled and both agreed to the same. Manslaughter! Rightfully so.

    And there is no "misdemeanor" murder either.
    Once upon a time, a guy in Chicago decided he'd buy his girlfriend some dope for her birthday (I didn't say he was a smart guy.).

    He went to the local dope house to buy her a bag of weed. The proprietor went off to get the customer his dope. While he was getting the product, the Chicago PD raided the establishment. This caused the proprietor to run for the back door. The wouldbe customer basically hid under a table, taking absolutely no action of any sort in the proceedings.

    Just as the proprietor reached the back door, the police kicked that in, causing the proprietor to reverse direction.

    The two groups of cops met in the middle. For whatever reason (It WAS the Chicago PD.) a cop from one group shot and killed a cop from the other group.

    Our "hero" who hid under a table was arrested (along with the dealer). He was charged, tried and convicted of felony murder. He got the DEATH PENALTY.

    Can you explain to me how the Atlanta cops had any LESS culpability than the guy who hid under a table, and how they deserve the death penalty LESS than he did?
    --- Gun control: The theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists.

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    LEO 229 wrote:
    I believe the element of murder requires some preparatory act.
    There are two common law elements to murder, actus reus and mens rea, the act and the state of mind. You'll have to find and cite a 'preparatory act' as element in statute or case law.

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    LEO 229 wrote:
    And there is no "misdemeanor" murder either.
    This is the first use of 'misdemeanor' on this page generally about murder so I can only imagine that you are taking exception to the term/concept felony murder.

    It is again a common law legal doctrine that extends the definition of murder in two ways; a manslaughter committed in the course of a separate felonious act without mens rea is escalated to murder and it makes a participant in a felonious act liable to murder.

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