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Thread: Vests while CC or OC

  1. #1
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    I did a quick search but really didn't find anything conclusive. Is it legal to wear a vest while carrying? Where can I find the law pertaining to the legality of wearing?

    If I can carry to protect my life, I would assume that I should be able to wear a vest to preserve or prolong my life to continue fighting, if that were the situation.



    Custom.45acp

  2. #2
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    custom.45acp wrote:
    I did a quick search but really didn't find anything conclusive. Is it legal to wear a vest while carrying? Where can I find the law pertaining to the legality of wearing?

    If I can carry to protect my life, I would assume that I should be able to wear a vest to preserve or prolong my life to continue fighting, if that were the situation.

    Custom.45acp
    I can't imagine why a bulletproof vest would be illegal to own or wear. But if you can afford to buy one, I think you and I need to be better friends...

  3. #3
    Regular Member Michigander's Avatar
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    I don't believe state law would do anything to get in your way (other than I believe there is a law against armored vehicles), but cities often have idiotic ordinances.

    Anyway, I don't think I would see a use unless I was in Detroit or Pontiac or something, and even then, only if I had to walk around for some odd reason. But if you want to, I think you should go for it. It's a free country.

    Still though, I must say, having helped experiment on some kevlar at the pit, I think it's an awfully false sense of security. Kevlar won't stand up to much of anything other than pistol rounds. Level 4 plate armor will stop knives and rifles and things, but it's heavy as hell and generally very uncomfortable. And any way you slice it, your head, neck, and groin will still be very vulnerable. :?






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    Regular Member dougwg's Avatar
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    From what I remember it's only illegal if you are wearing it during the commission of a crime.

    And you would look silly this summer in the heat.

  5. #5
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    dougwg wrote:
    From what I remember it's only illegal if you are wearing it during the commission of a crime.

    And you would look silly this summer in the heat.
    ...or have a felony conviction.

    750.227f Committing or attempting to commit crime involving violent act or threat of violent act against another person while wearing body armor as felony; penalty; consecutive term of imprisonment; exception; definitions.

    Sec. 227f. (1) Except as provided in subsection (2), an individual who commits or attempts to commit a crime that involves a violent act or a threat of a violent act against another person while wearing body armor is guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment for not more than 4 years, or a fine of not more than $2,000.00, or both. A term of imprisonment imposed for violating this section may be served consecutively to any term of imprisonment imposed for the crime committed or attempted.

    (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to either of the following:

    (a) A peace officer of this state or another state, or of a local unit of government of this state or another state, or of the United States, performing his or her duties as a peace officer while on or off a scheduled work shift as a peace officer.

    (b) A security officer performing his or her duties as a security officer while on a scheduled work shift as a security officer.

    (3) As used in this section:

    (a) “Body armor” means clothing or a device designed or intended to protect an individual’s body or a portion of an individual’s body from injury caused by a firearm.

    (b) “Security officer” means an individual lawfully employed to physically protect another individual or to physically protect the property of another person.

    History:
    Add. 1990, Act 321, Eff. Mar. 28, 1991;—Am. 1992, Act 218, Imd. Eff. Oct. 13, 1992;—Am. 1996, Act 163, Imd. Eff. Apr. 11, 1996;—Am.

    2000, Act 226, Eff. Oct. 1, 2000.

    [line]

    750.227g Body armor; purchase, ownership, possession, or use by convicted felon; prohibition; issuance of written permission; violation as felony; definitions.

    Sec. 227g. (1) Except as otherwise provided in this section, a person who has been convicted of a violent felony shall not purchase, own, possess, or use body armor.

    (2) A person who has been convicted of a violent felony whose employment, livelihood, or safety is dependent on his or her ability to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor may petition the chief of police of the local unit of government in which he or she resides or, if he or she does not reside in a local unit of government that has a police department, the county sheriff, for written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor under this section.

    (3) The chief of police of a local unit of government or the county sheriff may grant a person who properly petitions that chief of police or county sheriff under subsection (2) written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor as provided in this section if the chief of police or county sheriff determines that both of the following circumstances exist:

    (a) The petitioner is likely to use body armor in a safe and lawful manner.

    (b) The petitioner has reasonable need for the protection provided by body armor.

    (4) In making the determination required under subsection (3), the chief of police or county sheriff shall consider all of the following:

    (a) The petitioner’s continued employment.

    (b) The interests of justice.

    (c) Other circumstances justifying issuance of written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor.

    (5) The chief of police or county sheriff may restrict written permission issued to a petitioner under this section in any manner determined appropriate by that chief of police or county sheriff. If permission is restricted, the chief of police or county sheriff shall state the restrictions in the permission document.

    (6) It is the intent of the legislature that chiefs of police and county sheriffs exercise broad discretion in determining whether to issue written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor under this section. However, nothing in this section requires a chief of police or county sheriff to issue written permission to any particular petitioner. The issuance of written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor under this section does not relieve any person or entity from criminal liability that might otherwise be imposed.

    (7) A person who receives written permission from a chief of police or county sheriff to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor shall have that written permission in his or her possession when he or she is purchasing, owning, possessing, or using body armor.

    (8) A law enforcement agency may issue body armor to a person who is in custody or who is a witness to a crime for his or her own protection without a petition being previously filed under subsection (2). If the law enforcement agency issues body armor to the person under this subsection, the law enforcement agency shall document the reasons for issuing body armor and retain a copy of that document as an official record. The law enforcement agency shall also issue written permission to the person to possess and use body armor under this section.

    (9) A person who violates this section is guilty of a crime as follows:

    (a) For a violation of subsection (1), the person is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 4 years or a fine of not more than $2,000.00, or both.

    (b) For a violation of subsection (7), the person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $100.00, or both.

    (10) As used in this section:

    (a) “Body armor” means that term as defined in section 227f.

    (b) “Violent felony” means that term as defined in section 36 of 1953 PA 232, MCL 791.236.

    History:
    Add. 2000, Act 224, Eff. Oct. 1, 2000.


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