Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Does Utah have a Stop and ID law?

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Provo, Utah, USA
    Posts
    1,076

    Post imported post

    Just came across this issue in the California OC forum and am wondering about Utah.

  2. #2
    State Researcher Kevin Jensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Santaquin, Utah, USA
    Posts
    2,313

    Post imported post

    The way I read it, if you have been suspected of a public offense, then the officer may demand your name and address, but not necessarilly an ID card. Here are the laws for your review.

    77-7-15. Authority of peace officer to stop and question suspect -- Grounds.
    A peace officer may stop any person in a public place when he has a reasonable suspicion to believe he has committed or is in the act of committing or is attempting to commit a public offense and may demand his name, address and an explanation of his actions.
    And if you fail to provide that info...

    76-8-301.5. Failure to disclose identity.
    (1) A person is guilty of failure to disclose identity if during the period of time that the person is lawfully subjected to a stop as described in Section 77-7-15:
    (a) a peace officer demands that the person disclose the person's name;
    (b) the demand described in Subsection (1)(a) is reasonably related to the circumstances justifying the stop;
    (c) the disclosure of the person's name by the person does not present a reasonable danger of self-incrimination in the commission of a crime; and
    (d) the person fails to disclose the person's name.
    (2) Failure to disclose identity is a class B misdemeanor.
    Don't forget this gem...

    77-7-16. Authority of peace officer to frisk suspect for dangerous weapon -- Grounds.
    A peace officer who has stopped a person temporarily for questioning may frisk the person for a dangerous weapon if he reasonably believes he or any other person is in danger.
    And this one...

    77-7-17. Authority of peace officer to take possession of weapons.
    A peace officer who finds a dangerous weapon pursuant to a frisk may take and keep it until the completion of the questioning, at which time he shall either return it if lawfully possessed, or arrest such person.
    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." Robert A. Heinlein

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Provo, Utah, USA
    Posts
    1,076

    Post imported post

    Then, if I am reading correctly, only if you are being detained with "reasonable suspicion".

  4. #4
    State Researcher Kevin Jensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Santaquin, Utah, USA
    Posts
    2,313

    Post imported post

    That is how I read it also. I believe that the conditions of 77-7-15 must be met for the following laws to apply.
    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." Robert A. Heinlein

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •