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Thread: Just FYI: NRA Range

  1. #1
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    It is going to be closed from March 31st - April 15thish for construction.

    Just though I'd pass it along!

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    hsmith wrote:
    It is going to be closed from March 31st - April 15thish for construction.

    Just though I'd pass it along!
    you know what they're building?

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    They are replacing the backstop.

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    It would also really cool to see them remove all the "security guard" holes in the ceiling...

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    fryfrye wrote:
    It would also really cool to see them remove all the "security guard" holes in the ceiling...
    One thing they really need to fix is the overhead lights. I had a friend shooting a rifle, brass ejected and hit the fluorescent bulb overhead, thankfully he was standing to one side and broken glass showered down. No protection wrapping the frickin lights overhead!

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    When I was there yesterday I noticed a bullet hole in one the panes of glass that separates each shooting lane (between lanes 1 and 2). :shock:

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    hunter45 wrote:
    When I was there yesterday I noticed a bullet hole in one the panes of glass that separates each shooting lane (between lanes 1 and 2). :shock:
    Thats been there for awhile. As much as people like to complain about the strict RO's at the NRA, strick RO's save lives.

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    hsmith wrote:
    hunter45 wrote:
    When I was there yesterday I noticed a bullet hole in one the panes of glass that separates each shooting lane (between lanes 1 and 2). :shock:
    Thats been there for awhile. As much as people like to complain about the strict RO's at the NRA, strick RO's save lives.
    From what I understand that isn't actually a bullet-impact, but rather one of the carriers that was being taken down for maintenance broke loose and hit the glass right there. As the glass is apparently $1400 to replace, they opted to leave it there.

    I've seen one RO that will actually jump in and chew someone out for improper gun handling, and that would be "Andy", the tall, older, stocky guy, wears a revolver and a very confident attitude, works there on Saturday mornings. I go to that range 6 days a week (not on Tuesdays, when they're closed), and I've seen a lot of stupid stuff--I'm a big fan of Andy's style. I've heard him say that it's a good day if he only gets muzzled once (muzzle of someone's gun pointing at him).

    The other ROs will do their job, patrolling up and down the line, but they will generally hang back unless someone points out a problem. Nothing wrong with this...until someone gets hurt. Though just like the reason we all carry guns--only you are truly responsible for your own safety; can't depend on the ROs to keep you safe. While I shoot, I like to keep an eye on my neighbors--if I see a problem, either to themselves or to other people, then I'll lean over and point it out. The most common problems are thumbs-not-on-same-side-of-the-gun and gun-not-pointed-downrange.

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    Agreed, I try and keep tabs on those around.

    The worst I have seen was a guy looking down the barrel of a pistol

    I have never seen a RO rush out faster from behind the glass than that.

    I wish they were a bit more aggressive, good RO's are good RO's. As long as they are managing the noobs keeping guns between the lines and down range, that makes me happy.

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    hsmith wrote:
    As long as they are managing the noobs keeping guns between the lines and down range, that makes me happy.
    Agreed; I have a sheet of paper I like to print out and plunk down on an offender's table while he's not looking that reads "PLEASE KEEP GUNS POINTED DOWNRANGE. THANK YOU!". If no other rule is followed, keeping the guns pointed downrange will minimize any potential damage. If it's the floor or the ceiling or even the walls downrange that takes a bullet due to improper handling, it's better than the alternative.

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    hsmith wrote:
    ....

    The worst I have seen was a guy looking down the barrel of a pistol.
    WTF? Maybe they need to start scoring the tests they give out from now on.

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    kle wrote:
    While I shoot, I like to keep an eye on my neighbors--if I see a problem, either to themselves or to other people, then I'll lean over and point it out. The most common problems are thumbs-not-on-same-side-of-the-gun and gun-not-pointed-downrange.
    Is "thumbs-not-on-same-side-of-the-gun" a problem? That's how I was told to shoot my J-frame...

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    Riana wrote:
    kle wrote:
    While I shoot, I like to keep an eye on my neighbors--if I see a problem, either to themselves or to other people, then I'll lean over and point it out. The most common problems are thumbs-not-on-same-side-of-the-gun and gun-not-pointed-downrange.
    Is "thumbs-not-on-same-side-of-the-gun" a problem? That's how I was told to shoot my J-frame...
    Not for revolvers, but for semi-autos: a couple weeks ago a guy was shooting in the lane next to me with his weak thumb behind the slide of his Glock 19, and I didn't stop him before he pulled the trigger. I watched the slide go back into the knuckle of his thumb joint. I winced, but he kept on shooting, and when I looked back he was doing it again. I stopped him this time, but the damage was done--he was oozing blood from where the slide got him.

    For a J-frame, crossing the support-thumb over the back is fine, and probably even recommended: as safety-conscious as I am, I was treated to a thumb full of embedded propellant residue when I was practicing draw-to-fire with my snubnose revolver and reverted to my usual thumbs-forward grip. The grip works fine for most semi-autos, but not for a revolver since it put my thumb right beside the barrel-cylinder gap. I didn't feel it when it happened, but the next day I had a dull stinging sensation, and I couldn't figure out what all the little black things were in my skin...and then I remembered what I was doing the day before.

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    kle wrote:
    Riana wrote:
    kle wrote:
    While I shoot, I like to keep an eye on my neighbors--if I see a problem, either to themselves or to other people, then I'll lean over and point it out. The most common problems are thumbs-not-on-same-side-of-the-gun and gun-not-pointed-downrange.
    Is "thumbs-not-on-same-side-of-the-gun" a problem? That's how I was told to shoot my J-frame...
    Not for revolvers, but for semi-autos: a couple weeks ago a guy was shooting in the lane next to me with his weak thumb behind the slide of his Glock 19, and I didn't stop him before he pulled the trigger. I watched the slide go back into the knuckle of his thumb joint. I winced, but he kept on shooting, and when I looked back he was doing it again. I stopped him this time, but the damage was done--he was oozing blood from where the slide got him.

    For a J-frame, crossing the support-thumb over the back is fine, and probably even recommended: as safety-conscious as I am, I was treated to a thumb full of embedded propellant residue when I was practicing draw-to-fire with my snubnose revolver and reverted to my usual thumbs-forward grip. The grip works fine for most semi-autos, but not for a revolver since it put my thumb right beside the barrel-cylinder gap. I didn't feel it when it happened, but the next day I had a dull stinging sensation, and I couldn't figure out what all the little black things were in my skin...and then I remembered what I was doing the day before.
    Ah, that makes sense. Every time my husband fires his 22A, I have to remind him to keep his thumbs off the slide. Maybe if it bites him, he'll remember. I think I cross thumbs on it, too, but I'm nowhere near the slide, because I watch for that.

    Not that I fire his 22A often - I prefer my wheel gun.

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    Riana wrote:
    Ah, that makes sense. Every time my husband fires his 22A, I have to remind him to keep his thumbs off the slide. Maybe if it bites him, he'll remember. I think I cross thumbs on it, too, but I'm nowhere near the slide, because I watch for that.

    Not that I fire his 22A often - I prefer my wheel gun.
    Remove any chance the slide will get you by keeping them both on the same side; you fight the way you train, and you train the way you fight. If you end up needing your gun in a defensive situation, will you have the presence of mind to remember to keep your thumb away from the slide? Or will you be more concerned with the threat?

    Well, us wheel-gunners don't really need to worry about that (my sidearm is a S&W Model 10), but we seem to be few and far-between; it seems that 90% of the handguns at the range are semi-autos...and 50% of the people using them seem to be newbies, especially on weekends.

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    kle wrote:
    Riana wrote:
    Ah, that makes sense. Every time my husband fires his 22A, I have to remind him to keep his thumbs off the slide. Maybe if it bites him, he'll remember. I think I cross thumbs on it, too, but I'm nowhere near the slide, because I watch for that.

    Not that I fire his 22A often - I prefer my wheel gun.
    Remove any chance the slide will get you by keeping them both on the same side; you fight the way you train, and you train the way you fight. If you end up needing your gun in a defensive situation, will you have the presence of mind to remember to keep your thumb away from the slide? Or will you be more concerned with the threat?

    Well, us wheel-gunners don't really need to worry about that (my sidearm is a S&W Model 10), but we seem to be few and far-between; it seems that 90% of the handguns at the range are semi-autos...and 50% of the people using them seem to be newbies, especially on weekends.
    True. But the odds of the 22A being my sidearm in an emergency are pretty slim. It doesn't take as many rounds of 38 or 357 (from my 60 or hubby's Rossi 461) to get someone's attention.

    The 22's are for plinking, and his is the only semi-auto. Eventually I'll get a 22 revolver (when depends on what Taurus does with the lemon they sold me).


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    Riana wrote:
    True. But the odds of the 22A being my sidearm in an emergency are pretty slim. It doesn't take as many rounds of 38 or 357 (from my 60 or hubby's Rossi 461) to get someone's attention.

    The 22's are for plinking, and his is the only semi-auto. Eventually I'll get a 22 revolver (when depends on what Taurus does with the lemon they sold me).
    (we're veering a little off topic here, but I suppose the main intent of the thread--to notify us that the NRA range will be closed for a couple weeks--has been satisfied)

    They're a little pricey, but I recommend anything by Smith & Wesson (past or present). There are speedloaders available for every model (or really, for their cylinders), and fit & finish have been top-notch, in my experience. Plus, they'll hold their value pretty well. I've got two 617s (a -4 and -6, both with 6" barrels, both 10-shots) and a 17-8 (the blued version of the 617, 6" barrel, with a 10-shot cylinder), and I love them all. One is my current Bullseye .22, and the others have served in this capacity pretty well, too. You could find a Model 63 or an older Model 34 to complement your Model 60 for cheaper practice.

    Or Ruger's Single Six, if you don't mind single-action and single-loading/unloading. Those'll hold their values pretty well, too, and their fit and finish is pretty close to S&Ws.

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