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Thread: Youthful gun rights advocates important.

  1. #1
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    As we begin to transfer control of society into the hands of my generation, generation Y, it is important to think about and understand the changes that this will bring about. Generation x is the T.V. generation. Generation Y is the inter-network generation. We have been raised in a culture of globalization which has increased our understanding of some things, but has "limited" us in a very real way. As we move forward, it seems that our tradition of guns is going extinct. It's not our fault that we don't need guns, or that our opportunities to learn about and enjoy them are limited.

    Notice how I said our traditions are dying. Firearms are not dying and are not going to. Projectile weapons are a part of human history, and we can thank them for almost everything that is good in society. Obviously there is a yin to our yang. Guns have been used to rob, murder, threaten, and to secure and consolidate power. I am ashamed to admit that my generation does not understand the importance of our second amendment, or the bill of rights itself for that matter. Our ideas about guns are greatly influenced by things like James bond and Grand theft-auto.

    "The second amendment ain't about hunting" Many of my peers and gen-Xers don't understand the concept of an evil government. The only criticizm seems to be people complaining about their taxes. Years ago, the most patriotic thing to do was to critizice the government. Nowadays before speaking out, you need to worry about extraordinary rendition and stuff like that. Although the responsibility to keep the government in check belongs to the people, we have already failed. Would you say that we have a well regulated militia? What is it then? The NRA? If this is a well regulated militia, can someone please tell me the protocol for mobilization of the NRA? The NRA has about 4 million people. The U.S. Military has slightly fewer, but just think about how many members of the military are in the NRA. When @#$% hits the fan, how many of them will give up their paycheck and benefits to fight for the NRA? This is completely aside of the fact that no "militia" on the planet could hope to defeat the U.S. military. How can people fight Hum-V mounted microwave weapons, or sound cannons. What about lasers. Keep in mind that these are just the declassified weapons that we know about.

    My generation is too busy texting, going to school, working, and watching "American idol". Also people are living in cities, and because of hard times and many other reasons, fewer and fewer have places "up north" - as they are displaced by upper-class democrats from IL. Most people under 25 have never shot or even touched a firearm. What percent of senior citizens has fired a gun? Many of my peers have fired a gun, in boyscouts, or wherever, but don't understand that, just because they may not be an enthusiast, or a drooler, like myself, that gun rights are very important. Even if you don't own a gun, this is one of your top three rights without a doubt. If someone decides that they never want to own a gun, why should they care about their right to do so?

    Now, I love the superbowl, but if people were as good of citizens as they were sports fans,we would live in a utopia. Everyone can quote Brett Favre's stats and records, but can we quote our politicians stats, do we know their voting record? How many of us actually vote on EVERY election. I know I don't. Why does the patriot act exist? Why are we here? Why have elections, law, and due process? It seems that our constitutional rights depend on if we get lucky and get a good police chief.

    The younger people that do care, can be more easily intimidated by authorities, as they are used to following adult's orders. Remember people aren't adults now at 18, many remain in the home and rely on their parents for a longer time than has been the case for earlier generations. When receiving a perceived order, we have less experince refusing. If we have a lot of experience refusing orders, that means that we aren't/weren't respectable young adults. Also, the fact that police without doubt, treat you very differently if you just look youthful. If you are an adult wearing a suit, and begin asking about your rights, the reaction is far different than if you're 21 wearing jeans and a t-shirt, and begin asking about your rights. I have been flat out told I was wrong about my 14th amendment right, I have also had Muskego LEO (officer ziminski) tell me, "you watch too much C.S.I." when I refused an illegal vehicle search. Another 2 LEOs from 6th district (officers Larscheidt and Colon) tell me I watch too much T.V. and that I watch too many movies. It's as if there is a protocol dictating that an officer say this when a youth asks about rights. LOL.

    I am thinking of starting an organization, which I will base around a website, and forum, that is focused on networking and proliferation of responsible, youthful, gun owners and advocates.

    I was surprised to learn that I in fact have several peers on this forum. Gen-Y-ers, I'm calling on you, what do you think about something like this? I have been researching trying to find an outlet where I can work with juveniles to help them become responsible gun owners, but there isn't much out there. I would at very least like to network with as many of my peers as possible. After all, I know none of you guys (or gals) want to be the only person under 30 at the future OC events. I know I don't. lol.




  2. #2
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    Well I'm 22 and I agree with what you've said. Our society takes its entire way of life for granted. The beauty of the internet is the ability for people to network and support a common cause. I look forward to representing our generation and fight for our rights for some time to come.

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    Same here I'm 19 and see many of those around me not even caring. Also our rights right now are the most restricted when it comes to guns and what not.I often ask myself why did these peopleenactthese laws? Where were my fellow gun owners when I was 9? I realize I cannot change the past.

    But your definately right! we need to get something going! I mean we can't even buy a pistol from an ffl dealer or pistol ammo! Can't drink either.

    Ben

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    I am not of your generation, but the tail-end of the boomers. If you can determine where those before you failed to prevent onerous firearms regulations, you will be a step ahead when your generation has the reins. As a suggestion, start with laws in your respective states. The legislative records should show the progression of laws that are on the books. Such research may give you a good idea as to the mindset that placed prospective legislation in the flow, and what mindset allowed its passage.

    JOIN! Join the NRA, join the GOA, join local firearms clubs and groups. If you are not a member of some advocacy group, you become one voice in a yammering mass of background noise. That voice does count, but numbers in an organized group will help make a difference.

    Like it or not, the NRA is one of the oldest and largest advocacy groups. Divisiveness among the major groups is not a good thing. Some groups appear to try and build their own numbers at the expense of other groups. If you can, work to merge the purposes if you have that chance.

    Above all else, stay informed and subscribe to bill tracking that points out prospective legislation. I page through the thomas Library of Congress register weekly to see what is coming up, then I track relevent bills using GovTrack

    Where did those before you go wrong? That is a real complex issue. My thoughts are that we got complacent, and took our 2nd Amendment Right for granted for too long, and the camel stuck his nose under the tent up to his shoulders. Whack that camel between the eyes for us.

    In this age of instant information access, you have a better chance to stay well-informed than I did growing up in the 60's. 4 TV channels was not enough, nor was one local newspaper.

    Above all else, EXERCISE your Right at every opportunity where it is still lawful to do so. Encourage revision of statute where it is no longer lawful to exercise your Right.

    </soapbox>
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

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    I blame the lack of knowledge , non-interest and what seems like a fear of guns on the teaching of the schools and media.

    For instance, I have a friend that has an 18 yr old physically disabled son that starts in with anti-gun rhetoric whenever we talk about firearms, politicians against the 2A, or going target shooting and even open carry. I asked the kid why firearms are not an interest to him and if he has ever went target shooting.

    He replied with "Guns Kill people" and the usual spewingsasociated withthe Anti's.
    So we took him target shooting one day and taught him correct handling procedures, how to load, unload, basicsafety, and we were quite surprised when his target shooting skill were actually better that his fathers skills. The kid could place a tighter group on paper than his dad could! I do not hear his anti rhetoric anymore out of this kid, and he now shows an interest in shooting while he would refuse to go shootingwith his father at other times before this.

    While I was in grade school and high school, there was alwasy some cub-scout/bot-scout shooting training, I do not believe they do that anymore. If a parent does not partake in any shooting sports, the chance of their offspring participating is Zero to none. it seems as if the hippie wannabe's handed down their "Love not war" philosophy to the kids, and wouldn;t even allow a young adult to partake in any shooting sports.

    Do they even teach archery in high school anymore? I would bring in my compound bow for PE class during the archery part of PE,. I am willing to bet no schools except for the rare few in the more conservaive states even have archery anymore, can anyone confirm?

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    Do not join. Do not join the blind followers that enable the failed leaders that led us here.

    Read The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America by Charlotte Thomson Iserbyt.

    ETA: http://www.deliberatedumbingdown.com.../DDDoA.sml.pdf 6.75 MB PDF

    Either we are equal or we are not. Good people ought to be armed where they will, with wits and guns and the truth. Atlas is shrugging.

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    True that doug! I was still in highschool a year ago thank god I hung out with some dumbass friends otherwise I would have never have got my diploma. Everyday I went to school I had to learn how to be submissive and try not to get too riled up to the B.S rules and teachings they have. It's like a nazi re-education camp. But I got through it unlike many others and now am in college. Last week I posted in my public journal for my english class about open carry and the developments of last week. Here's one of the reponses I got today

    I just heard about this yesterday. I don't know all the details but personally I don't think it's a good idea. There's already enough people out there carrying guns and shooting people and beating up 70 yr olds because they were "bored". I think it could cause alot more problems.
    .........I decided I'm not even going to respond to the above statement.



    Ben

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    double post

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    Nutczak wrote:
    Do they even teach archery in high school anymore? I would bring in my compound bow for PE class during the archery part of PE,. I am willing to bet no schools except for the rare few in the more conservaive states even have archery anymore, can anyone confirm?
    I know they do have archery in union grove.. we needed permission slips and all that but i believe everyone (except 1 for religious reasons) participated..
    i brought my compound bow to school and also my trigger release. had to keep them in the gym office when not on the range. everyone seemed to have a good time with it..
    and when i was in boy scouts i remember shooting bb guns when we were younger then graduating to .22 rifles. then shotguns for the 16+ crowd.
    the boy scouts have always taught safety first and to be prepared so i think proper firearm handling fits in with both of those..


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    BJA wrote:
    True that doug! I was still in highschool a year ago thank god I hung out with some dumbass friends otherwise I would have never have got my diploma. Everyday I went to school I had to learn how to be submissive and try not to get too riled up to the B.S rules and teachings they have. It's like a nazi re-education camp. But I got through it unlike many others and now am in college. Last week I posted in my public journal for my english class about open carry and the developments of last week. Here's one of the reponses I got today

    I just heard about this yesterday. I don't know all the details but personally I don't think it's a good idea. There's already enough people out there carrying guns and shooting people and beating up 70 yr olds because they were "bored". I think it could cause alot more problems.
    .........I decided I'm not even going to respond to the above statement.



    Ben
    Ben, I think a response to that comment is needed, they seem to forget that these people committing crimes shouldn't be the only ones carrying guns, They are able to get away with the unlawful behavior becuase they think they are the only ones with guns. Once openly armed people become more visible, these criminals will not have such easy pickens, it may even make them think twice.

  11. #11
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    Nutczak wrote:

    Do they even teach archery in high school anymore? I would bring in my compound bow for PE class during the archery part of PE,. I am willing to bet no schools except for the rare few in the more conservaive states even have archery anymore, can anyone confirm?
    They taught archery at my HS in Greenfiled, WI. I am class of 2004.

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    Great post Spongebob, I agree with your write-up. I am 24 and I have observed many of the same things you pointed out. I grew up in Elkhorn part of my life as well as in the city since my parents are divorced and i lived with both of them back and forth. I got to grow up around hunting and firearms since my dad has been a big hunter since he was real young. I was able to learn the proper ways of handling a firearm early on in life and have been involved ever since. I do a lot of hunting as well as shooting and have introduced both to a few of my friends that grew up in the city and didn't get to experiance these kinds of activities. I am glad I did and so are they. They enjoy it so much and it's good to see the positive effect it has on them. If only everyone our age could at least experience it and see all the positive sides to it all instead of being brainwashed by media and whoever else. I guess all we can do is try to keep educating the uneducated and hope they take an active role as we have to help keep our rights protected.

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    Really, you guys have hit this one on the head. As the Gen Xers lose interest in firearms, they no longer pass that kind of tradition on to the kids, who in turn learn about firearms through TV or movies, or what they hear in general on the news. Enrollment in our cornerstone Youth programs such as the Boyscouts and 4-H are dropping. When I started 4-H in '98, Barron County had one of the largest and best run shootin sports programs in the state, but as the years went by you could see the participation dropping noticeably. I wouldn't be surprised to find that over the 8 years I was there that the numbers dropped by at least 1/3.
    And what I think works on top of that here in WI is the fact that daily carry is so restricted. Let's face it, you have got to be a little ballsy to be open carrying, and the vehicle restrictions and school zone law all add up to make it way out of the league that most folks would be comfortable with. You can bet that it we had respectable conceal carry laws that daily carry would jump to the thousands almost overnight, and with it the ability to spread the word that guns aren't inheirently evil.

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    I am going to start a list of peers on this board. If you don't want your name and age on "some list" pm me or else don't tell me your age.

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    I agree with everything that you said Spongebob, I am one of the only people in my group of friends that grew up around firearms and STILL engages in alot of firearms related activities. I hae my grandfather to thank for being into firearms and pushing me to get active in the politics of the rights angle. I see so many kids my age talking about gangs and "being strapped" that it makes me sick. They do it to be cool, not because it is a god given right. I havent OC'd out of my "bubble" yet, but plan to soon and in NO way am I doing it scare anybody, or make anybody think I'm cool. I've seen criminal acts committed, one especially to my grandmother and if her or myself had been OCing, the outcome would have been very different, most likely without a shot being fired. I am ready and willing to become very active in this fight.

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