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Thread: Temporary gun storage? - Bowling Green area

  1. #1
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    Hello:

    Forgive me for asking this here, but are there any safe places to temporarily store a moderate firearm collection and ammo in Bowling Green or surrounding area? I anticipate a move there, but wish to store my guns, etc. somewhere safe during the move-in period. Basically, I have a mover coming to load, haul, and unload ... but I do not want the mover handling firearms, or taking them out of my possession.

    Perhaps some of the mini-storages are secure and don't have policies against firearms storage? I've looked into several on the internet but haven't found what I am looking for.

    Thanks in advance!

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    I'd ask your local PD if you can use an Evidence Locker.

    couldn't hurt to ask.

  3. #3
    Regular Member Statesman's Avatar
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    GarandFan wrote:
    Hello:

    Forgive me for asking this here, but are there any safe places to temporarily store a moderate firearm collection and ammo in Bowling Green or surrounding area? I anticipate a move there, but wish to store my guns, etc. somewhere safe during the move-in period. Basically, I have a mover coming to load, haul, and unload ... but I do not want the mover handling firearms, or taking them out of my possession.

    Perhaps some of the mini-storages are secure and don't have policies against firearms storage? I've looked into several on the internet but haven't found what I am looking for.

    Thanks in advance!
    You might also try any business that sells safes. They may rent out a safe for you.

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    None of the self storage units around that I know of officially allow fire arm storage. I live in BG and if you need any help with local stuff let me know and I will help anyway I can. My first choice would be talk to the guy that runs Bishop's guns outside of Glasgow or one of the guys at Cheek's trading post in Scottsville. They would be the best bet as far as safe storage, I am sure one of them would work somethign out with you. You might might have to offically "pawn" them but if the storage is only for a month or two it would only costs the monthly fees for them to hold on to em and insure their safety. If you need more info PM me and I will send you the numbers for those places.

    Good Luck getting out of Cooke County, IL and Let me be one of the firsts to welcome you to a Free state.

  5. #5
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    KY-RN-G wrote:
    None of the self storage units around that I know of officially allow fire arm storage. I live in BG and if you need any help with local stuff let me know and I will help anyway I can. My first choice would be talk to the guy that runs Bishop's guns outside of Glasgow or one of the guys at Cheek's trading post in Scottsville. They would be the best bet as far as safe storage, I am sure one of them would work somethign out with you. You might might have to offically "pawn" them but if the storage is only for a month or two it would only costs the monthly fees for them to hold on to em and insure their safety. If you need more info PM me and I will send you the numbers for those places.

    Good Luck getting out of Cooke County, IL and Let me be one of the firsts to welcome you to a Free state.
    Remember, if you store at a FFL dealer,you will be required to submit to a check to get them back, as if you are purchasing them.
    Speed is fine
    Accuracy is final

  6. #6
    Regular Member Statesman's Avatar
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    Wow. You have to submit to a NICS check to get your own firearms back from an FFL dealer? What's the justification for this rule or law?

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    Thanks for the advice, and the welcome, and the offers to help.

    I have learned that Three Springs self storage accepts storage of firearms, but for insurance reasons, not ammunition. Will keep looking, and will consider contacting Bishops or Cheeks.

    Thanks again!

    Frankly, I don't have as much problem with the movers dealing with the ammo ... just not the guns. It's my responsibility to ensure they aren't exposed to theft. And even though the movers are supposed to be trustworthy, I am one of those "the buck stops with me" kind of people.

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    my best advice to you is to keep them with you until the mave is complete. put them in a case and put them in the trunk of you're car. or truck.That is the way I moved from southern ky to g-town.

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    Statesman wrote:
    Wow. You have to submit to a NICS check to get your own firearms back from an FFL dealer? What's the justification for this rule or law?
    Well, the justification is that if they DON'T do the check, and you have become inelligible to own the weapons since you placed them in storage, they are now guilty of providing firearms to those who are inelligible.

    Simple.

    It's the same principle as this:

    As a police officer, I come into the possession of say, a purse that someone has turned over to me. I have to inventory the contents of the purse BEFRE i return it to the owner. Theoritically, there could be contraband in the purse, and if I don't inventory it, and turn it over to the owner, then I, as a police officer, have given someone contraband.

  10. #10
    Regular Member Statesman's Avatar
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    superdemon wrote:
    Statesman wrote:
    Wow. You have to submit to a NICS check to get your own firearms back from an FFL dealer? What's the justification for this rule or law?
    Well, the justification is that if they DON'T do the check, and you have become inelligible to own the weapons since you placed them in storage, they are now guilty of providing firearms to those who are inelligible.

    Simple.

    It's the same principle as this:

    As a police officer, I come into the possession of say, a purse that someone has turned over to me. I have to inventory the contents of the purse BEFRE i return it to the owner. Theoritically, there could be contraband in the purse, and if I don't inventory it, and turn it over to the owner, then I, as a police officer, have given someone contraband.
    I can understand the justification for this. I'm not sure of the wording behind this statute, but why would they be guilty of "providing" firearms to someone, if they were only storing their property for them? No purchase for a firearm was initiated, rather, only space for storage.

    I guess I'd have to read the statute first before I jump to conclusions here.

    As a police officer, I come into the possession of say, a purse that someone has turned over to me. I have to inventory the contents of the purse BEFRE i return it to the owner. Theoritically, there could be contraband in the purse, and if I don't inventory it, and turn it over to the owner, then I, as a police officer, have given someone contraband.
    I have to disagree with such a case, because being guilty of giving someone contraband should be based on intent. If you don't know the purse contains contraband, what is there to be guilty of? Wouldn't this be an unwarranted search?

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    Statesman wrote:
    superdemon wrote:
    Statesman wrote:
    Wow. You have to submit to a NICS check to get your own firearms back from an FFL dealer? What's the justification for this rule or law?
    Well, the justification is that if they DON'T do the check, and you have become inelligible to own the weapons since you placed them in storage, they are now guilty of providing firearms to those who are inelligible.

    Simple.

    It's the same principle as this:

    As a police officer, I come into the possession of say, a purse that someone has turned over to me. I have to inventory the contents of the purse BEFRE i return it to the owner. Theoritically, there could be contraband in the purse, and if I don't inventory it, and turn it over to the owner, then I, as a police officer, have given someone contraband.
    I can understand the justification for this. I'm not sure of the wording behind this statute, but why would they be guilty of "providing" firearms to someone, if they were only storing their property for them? No purchase for a firearm was initiated, rather, only space for storage.

    I guess I'd have to read the statute first before I jump to conclusions here.

    As a police officer, I come into the possession of say, a purse that someone has turned over to me. I have to inventory the contents of the purse BEFRE i return it to the owner. Theoritically, there could be contraband in the purse, and if I don't inventory it, and turn it over to the owner, then I, as a police officer, have given someone contraband.
    I have to disagree with such a case, because being guilty of giving someone contraband should be based on intent. If you don't know the purse contains contraband, what is there to be guilty of? Wouldn't this be an unwarranted search?
    It isnot an unwarranted search, in reality its not a search at all. With the bag now in police possession its very much anecessitythat an"INVENTORY" of all items and the conditions of the items be documented. Serves dual purposes but in the end protects and agency from the claim they received Xamount of items anddid not return all of it.The unfortunate truth is that if contraband is found during this "inventory" it would very much be admissible in court.

    AnFFL dealerproblaby does the check whether your buying or storing because as a licensed dealer it his responsiblity to ensure you are legal to possess a weapon. Sounds like a requirement of being a licensed dealer.

  12. #12
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    Fred wrote:
    Statesman wrote:
    superdemon wrote:
    Statesman wrote:
    Wow. You have to submit to a NICS check to get your own firearms back from an FFL dealer? What's the justification for this rule or law?
    Well, the justification is that if they DON'T do the check, and you have become inelligible to own the weapons since you placed them in storage, they are now guilty of providing firearms to those who are inelligible.

    Simple.

    It's the same principle as this:

    As a police officer, I come into the possession of say, a purse that someone has turned over to me. I have to inventory the contents of the purse BEFRE i return it to the owner. Theoritically, there could be contraband in the purse, and if I don't inventory it, and turn it over to the owner, then I, as a police officer, have given someone contraband.
    I can understand the justification for this. I'm not sure of the wording behind this statute, but why would they be guilty of "providing" firearms to someone, if they were only storing their property for them? No purchase for a firearm was initiated, rather, only space for storage.

    I guess I'd have to read the statute first before I jump to conclusions here.

    As a police officer, I come into the possession of say, a purse that someone has turned over to me. I have to inventory the contents of the purse BEFRE i return it to the owner. Theoritically, there could be contraband in the purse, and if I don't inventory it, and turn it over to the owner, then I, as a police officer, have given someone contraband.
    I have to disagree with such a case, because being guilty of giving someone contraband should be based on intent. If you don't know the purse contains contraband, what is there to be guilty of? Wouldn't this be an unwarranted search?
    It isnot an unwarranted search, in reality its not a search at all. With the bag now in police possession its very much anecessitythat an"INVENTORY" of all items and the conditions of the items be documented. Serves dual purposes but in the end protects and agency from the claim they received Xamount of items anddid not return all of it.The unfortunate truth is that if contraband is found during this "inventory" it would very much be admissible in court.

    AnFFL dealerproblaby does the check whether your buying or storing because as a licensed dealer it his responsiblity to ensure you are legal to possess a weapon. Sounds like a requirement of being a licensed dealer.
    All the person would have to claim is that the contraband was placed in the purse by a third party after it left her control. It would be admissible, but easily defeated.



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    very much true

  14. #14
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    Statesman wrote:
    Wow.* You have to submit to a NICS check to get your own firearms back from an FFL dealer?* What's the justification for this rule or law?
    I just finished up a court case that took over 4 years to return a Ruger Single-Six revolver to me(theft - the guy got 67 months). Before the prosecutor could return it I had to do a NICS check even though I have a Washington CPL and checked my carry weapon at the front desk of the courthouse in a supplied lockbox.

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