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Thread: One more thing for your carry-kit.

  1. #1
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    You know to bring a camera and voice recorder, not to mention your gun and holster, but have you thought about carrying a scanner radio?

    Imagine knowing 7 to 10 minutes ahead of time if the police are coming to harass you for your lawful carry of a firearm.

    I just don't want anybody to think I'm trying to "impersonate an officer".

    You wouldn't believe how much crazy stuff is constantly happening in Milwaukee. Trust me, if you listen to a scanner radio, you will quickly realize that you should never go about unarmed. On a typical night there are several "man with a gun", "shots fired", "armed robbery", "home invasion", and "fight" calls.

    Another enlightening thing about owning a scanner is that you realize just how long it takes police to respond. Even to something like "shots fired". Do you really want to be stuck waiting while they figure out who is going to be dispatched, then wait for them to drive over there, and hope they arrive in time? Most combat scenarios are over in less than one minute. The police are often only there in time to investigate a crime, not to stop it.

    One more thing about owning a scanner that I think many people around here could benefit from: Respect for police. When you realize the things police have to encounter on a daily basis, I mean its just unreal. Every day for these brave men and women is an episode of "COPS". They really do lay it on the line EVERY day. The thing is that a few bad-apples ruin the image of police. Of course you're gonna remember the one or two cops that are jerks. Just like you remember the one or two mechanics, bosses, teachers, or bus drivers who are jerks. If you really truly respect the badge, I believe that shows through in your encounters with police, and it is mutually beneficial. Trust me. It works out better if you do your best to cooperate, even if you KNOW you're right. Be patient with the police. They deal with the bottom of the barrel, and do not know if you're a scumbag who wants to kill them, or just a citizen exercising a right. Help them as much as you're able to, without giving them evidence to use against you in court.


    If anybody has any basic questions about scanner radios, you may PM me, or post it here. I am no expert, but know a lil bit.

    Just something to think about that many people may have never considered.

  2. #2
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    Spongebob wrote:
    You know to bring a camera and voice recorder, not to mention your gun and holster, but have you thought about carrying a scanner radio?
    I have two digitals - one stationary and one portable and everything is digital up here.

    The people who vacation up here and even many locals, see the northwoods as safe and pristine. It's far from that when you listens to the calls on the scanner. Sure theres' folks that leave keys in a car and the house unlocked and live without problems. They wouldn't if they heard about the break ins and the drugs. The kids like heading into the state/national forests to complete their deals. Not only do the nice people like it up here but plenty of bad guys like it too. My neighborhood is mostly old folks but there has been a peeking tom pervert slipping into folks homes, arson, robberies, etc. One never knows when one of the nuts crosses the line into something more harmful. All good reasons to carry.

  3. #3
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    Cobbersmom wrote:
    Spongebob wrote:
    You know to bring a camera and voice recorder, not to mention your gun and holster, but have you thought about carrying a scanner radio?
    I have two digitals - one stationary and one portable and everything is digital up here.
    When did that happen? I heard a rumor that digital trunking was coming to the northwoods, But I didn't think it happened yet because my 20+yr old realistic 100 channel base scanner has been working fine and I am hearing both sides of the conversation on every call.
    This scanner is so old it still has channels that are not included the newer models.
    (it was a $10.00 purchase in a Bradenton FL pawn shop 10 years ago)

  4. #4
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    Nutczak wrote:
    When did that happen? I heard a rumor that digital trunking was coming to the northwoods, But I didn't think it happened yet because my 20+yr old realistic 100 channel base scanner has been working fine and I am hearing both sides of the conversation on every call.
    This scanner is so old it still has channels that are not included the newer models.
    (it was a $10.00 purchase in a Bradenton FL pawn shop 10 years ago.
    What are you listening to? Minocqua, and most fire/rescue is still analog but Oneida and Vilas went digital last fall. Vilas mostly works off Law1, Eagle River and LdF on Law 2 and 3 - not sure in which order. The best stuff is on Oneida and Vilas but the Minocqua dispatchers are much less professional in their banter.

  5. #5
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    Milwaukee can't afford digital yet. knock on wood

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    I don't think carrying a scanner will get you an "impersonating" a police officer charge any more than carrying a gun will. Cops don't carry scanners, anyway. Probably the only things you can carry that will get charged as impersonating is a police badge or other emblem (or flashing a junior g-man toy badge quickly), and maybe police lights on your vehicle (and using them.) Just telling someone that you're a cop-- when you're not-- will certainly suffice. I believe the statute says something about "intentionally misleading others into believing" that one is a peace officer. Overall it is your behavior much more than your equipment which will bring an impersonating charge. There's no law against owning a police badge or even a full uniform. But flashing a badge of any sort at somebody and motioning them to pull over is certainly a no-no.

    I have considered carrying a scanner, but never have while OCing for a couple of reasons-- one, it's just too much equipment; two, it's as if you're anticipating or planning an unfriendly encounter with the police. My primary interest in a scanner would not be to provide a warning that police are coming, but rather to get an accurate idea of the information given to the officers by the dispatcher.

    In Madison, and probably other larger urban areas, there is so much radio traffic that there's a good chance you'd miss the call regarding you. In more rural areas, that's less of a risk, particularly if the law enforcement agency uses only a single frequency. If you're carrying a gun, and even if you're not, you shouldn't be walking around in condition white. The arrival of other persons openly carrying a firearms (the police) should not come as a surprise to you if you're aware of your surroundings. Five minutes warning, or five seconds warning, shouldn't matter to you if you're awared and prepared.

    A couple of weeks ago I was watching one of the Madison cops trudging down State Street with so much crap on her belt that there was no room for another item. I noted the holster/gun, ammo pouch, handcuff pouch, a large flashlight, taser, I think a glove holder, and a radio and who knows what else. I doubt she'd manage more than a jog if she needed to move quickly. We are not police, and there's no reason to overload ourselves with equipment.

    I have a couple voice recorders, all are small, yet I haven't carried them. The best thing I've found to use as a voice recorder is my little Sansa Clip 4 gig MP3 player. I doubt it weighs an ounce. It's 2 inches by an inch and a quarter, and barely more than a quarter of an inch thick. In my tests it has excellent voice recording capability built in, not to mention it holds songs and has a built-in radio. It is inconspicuous and does not look like a voice recorder.
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  7. #7
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    Shotgun wrote:
    I don't think carrying a scanner will get you an "impersonating" a police officer charge any more than carrying a gun will. Cops don't carry scanners, anyway. Probably the only things you can carry that will get charged as impersonating is a police badge or other emblem (or flashing a junior g-man toy badge quickly), and maybe police lights on your vehicle (and using them.) Just telling someone that you're a cop-- when you're not-- will certainly suffice. I believe the statute says something about "intentionally misleading others into believing" that one is a peace officer. Overall it is your behavior much more than your equipment which will bring an impersonating charge. There's no law against owning a police badge or even a full uniform. But flashing a badge of any sort at somebody and motioning them to pull over is certainly a no-no.

    I have considered carrying a scanner, but never have while OCing for a couple of reasons-- one, it's just too much equipment; two, it's as if you're anticipating or planning an unfriendly encounter with the police. My primary interest in a scanner would not be to provide a warning that police are coming, but rather to get an accurate idea of the information given to the officers by the dispatcher.

    In Madison, and probably other larger urban areas, there is so much radio traffic that there's a good chance you'd miss the call regarding you. In more rural areas, that's less of a risk, particularly if the law enforcement agency uses only a single frequency. If you're carrying a gun, and even if you're not, you shouldn't be walking around in condition white. The arrival of other persons openly carrying a firearms (the police) should not come as a surprise to you if you're aware of your surroundings. Five minutes warning, or five seconds warning, shouldn't matter to you if you're awared and prepared.

    A couple of weeks ago I was watching one of the Madison cops trudging down State Street with so much crap on her belt that there was no room for another item. I noted the holster/gun, ammo pouch, handcuff pouch, a large flashlight, taser, I think a glove holder, and a radio and who knows what else. I doubt she'd manage more than a jog if she needed to move quickly. We are not police, and there's no reason to overload ourselves with equipment.

    I have a couple voice recorders, all are small, yet I haven't carried them. The best thing I've found to use as a voice recorder is my little Sansa Clip 4 gig MP3 player. I doubt it weighs an ounce. It's 2 inches by an inch and a quarter, and barely more than a quarter of an inch thick. In my tests it has excellent voice recording capability built in, not to mention it holds songs and has a built-in radio. It is inconspicuous and does not look like a voice recorder.
    I know cops don't carry scanners, but they carry portable radios, and I'm more worried about the single cop on the street, because I can just picture how it would be the first thing out of their mouth. "what are you trying to impersonate a cop?"


    It's pretty obvious that you can't motion someone to pull over while flashing a bogus badge at them.

    I'm not anticipating a negative encounter with police, but I'm sure as sh^t not anticipating a positive one either! The only thing I am anticipating is an encounter. You're right about the real reason being to be able to interpret the nature of the complaint, and the tone and context of the police and dispatcher's communications.

    I really only ever go to condition: TOPE (ha ha)
    I still think minutes is better than seconds, maybe if you heard that a store manager called, you could strike up a conversation with him, and resolve the conflict citizen to citizen. I also like to have it because I want to know if there's an accident on the freeway, or what if there's a real real real emergency that needs citizen first responders, plus I just like to know what's going on in my neck of the woods.


    I definitely would never ever think about listening for a crime and then go get myself and my gun in the middle of it. That is not what this is about. The first thing on my mind if I heard of a crime in progress nearby would be GET AWAY and CONDITION ORANGE (if the radio has identified a threat)


    I have a big handheld and a tiny scanner made by Uniden for radioshack. made for nascar, but when programmed properly, turns into a powerful tool. Would not weigh me down.

    How much did you pay for that MP3 player? Is it like one of the ones that can like clip to your shirt pocket or wherever? Can it record from up to 15 or 20 ft away?
    Pm me or post here thanks


  8. #8
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    I don't believe carrying a scanner will help the situation. Being realistic if I were a police officer I would not stop some one for open carry. However, if I seen someone walking down the street and that person was open carrying and in possession of a police scanner I might become suspicious and that would give me probable cause for a terry stop. The officer's thought may be - Why are you carrying a fire arm and a police scanner are you going to rob some one and try to get away before the police get there? Hey, stranger things have happened, right?

    The object is to not create a lot of attention to ourselves and to act as though open carry is our way of life, not a way of life we are trying to impose on others or a way of bringing attention to ourselves.

    Just act natural as if this is something you have done your whole life. If an officer stops you, he stops you. He is within his authority as an officer. That does not mean he will arrest you. In fact if the same officer stops you a couple of times he may very well get to know you and become supportive of our cause and that is what we want in the first place.

    If and officer stops you and asks your name he may merely be checking to insure your not a felon and nothing more. They do have that authority.

    Just be safe and enjoy open carry, don't make it a major project to enjoy your right. If you have to carry around every piece of electronic equipment you have to open carry you are going to become bored with the whole process and soon find yourself leaving your fire arm at home.

    At the very most bring a small video camera or cell phone camera or a small digital tape recorder and even better yet, how about bringing a friend, spouse or significant other.

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