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Thread: Just an odd encounter with the WSP revenue patrol.

  1. #1
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    X-posted to NWCDL.

    I was driving home from my folk's house in Kent today. On southbound 167 just south of 18 when my phone rang with an "urgent text message". (as an aside, how fracking urgent can a TEXT message be? Try calling.) Anyhow, I pulled over on the right shoulder to read/respond to it. No sooner had I finished replying when a Trooper pulled up behind me. He walks up to the right side and taps on the window. I roll it down and he leans in... :

    Trooper: Everything OK?

    Me: Yeah, stupid text message...

    Trooper: Well, thanks for pulling over to read it instead of driving on.

    Me: I can barely walk and chew gum at the same time.

    Trooper: You know you right brakelight is out? Can I look at your license?

    Me: Sure. By the way, I'm carrying on my CPL right now.

    ::road noise::

    Trooper: Huh? What about a CDL?

    Me: NO, I said I am carrying a weapon and I have my CPL right here.

    Trooper: So?

    ::hands license back::

    Trooper: It's your right brakelight.

    Me: ...Uh, thanks.

    He drove off and I sat there for like another minute, waiting for another cop, like in that movie Super Troopers or something.

    Weird being on the other side of the badge.
    "There is NO timer in a gunfight, but there IS another guy with a gun, and he's probably in a hurry!"- from someone who bothered to go and check

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    Regular Member sempercarry's Avatar
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    I usually dont tell them I am carrying unless they ask.....there is just no point.

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    Regular Member Window_Seat's Avatar
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    Sounds like this was a rather weird, yet positive encounter in a state where I'm considering relocating (from the PRK).

    Erik.

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    NavyLT wrote:
    Stoked wrote:
    He drove off and sat there for like another minute, waiting for another cop, like in that movie Super Troopers or something.
    Your story is contradictory. Which did he do? Drive off or sat there?
    I think he meant the cop drove off and he sat there for a minute. Kinda confusing though.
    DISCLAIMER: This post may contain libertarian ideas and language that are consistent with the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, including a belief in liberty, rule of law, and natural rights. It may also contain opinions critical of government and the tyrannies being committed by such. If you are an authoritarian, statist, or other freedom hater, side effects of reading this post may include high blood pressure, loose stool, severe genital itching, and diarrhea of the mouth.

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    Sorry, my typo. I was the one sitting on the shoulder, a little stunned. When I finally decided to leave, he was probably in Sumner
    "There is NO timer in a gunfight, but there IS another guy with a gun, and he's probably in a hurry!"- from someone who bothered to go and check

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    When I was pulled over by WSP he saw the gun on my right hip(he was at the passenger window), mag in the gun, the Hornady Tap hat I was wearing, and the stuffed full range bag on the passenger seat. The only thing he asked me was if he could see my CPL.He took it, glancedat it, handed it backand then proceeded to ask me if I knew how fast I was going....



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    Every encounter I've hand with state patrol has been the same. "I'm carry a weapon", "good for you".

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    WSP are usually much more informed and "people-friendly" than the local city or county types. As with all "rules", there are always exceptions. YMMV
    When the **** hits the fan, ask yourself: What Would Bugly Do?

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    NavyLT wrote:
    Nosrac wrote:
    When I was pulled over by WSP he saw the gun on my right hip(he was at the passenger window), mag in the gun, the Hornady Tap hat I was wearing, and the stuffed full range bag on the passenger seat. The only thing he asked me was if he could see my CPL.He took it, glancedat it, handed it backand then proceeded to ask me if I knew how fast I was going....

    To which you replied, of course, "No, I'm sorry, I don't know how fast I was going." Because to answer otherwise would be a violation of your 5th amendment rights. :shock:

    But, WSP does deserve a pat on the back for being firearm friendly.
    John, that would also open a door as you just admitted not mbeing aware of your actions. Just hand him your license and say nothing.

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    NavyLT wrote:
    Trigger Dr wrote:
    NavyLT wrote:
    Nosrac wrote:
    When I was pulled over by WSP he saw the gun on my right hip(he was at the passenger window), mag in the gun, the Hornady Tap hat I was wearing, and the stuffed full range bag on the passenger seat. The only thing he asked me was if he could see my CPL.He took it, glancedat it, handed it backand then proceeded to ask me if I knew how fast I was going....

    To which you replied, of course, "No, I'm sorry, I don't know how fast I was going." Because to answer otherwise would be a violation of your 5th amendment rights. :shock:

    But, WSP does deserve a pat on the back for being firearm friendly.
    John, that would also open a door as you just admitted not mbeing aware of your actions. Just hand him your license and say nothing.
    Except that the officer asked a specific question "Do you know how fast you were going?"
    Which leads to the obvious answer: "Yes Officer, I DO know how fast I was going."
    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

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    "Officer, with all due respect it doesn't matter how fast I thought I was going...what matters is how fast YOU think I was going!"

    -adamsesq

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    Some years ago, I had this interaction with a trooper . . .

    Driving eastbound on Hwy 8 through Montesano, and I pass under an overpass. In my rearview, I see a cruiser coming down the onramp with his overheads on. I think to myself, "geez, he's going somewhere in a hurry." When he pulls up behind me and I realize he's after me, I'm surprised. I just lift off the accelerator and pull to the shoulder.

    I pull out my wallet and reach for my registration while the trooper walks to my rolled-down window.

    Him: "Do you know how fast you were going?"

    Me: "No, I really don't."

    Him (looking puzzled): "What do you mean you don't?"

    Me: "I was surprized when you pulled up behind me, and I didn't think to look down at the speedometer."

    Him: "You were going 65."

    Me: "Yes, I probably was."

    Him (looking more puzzled): "What do you mean by that?"

    Me: "Well, I've worked all day, and I was just driving home and had the radio on. I'm used to driving on I-5 and know the sound of the engine at freeway speed. I don't usually have to look at the speedometer to know I'm at or close to the limit."

    Him: "Let me have your license. I'll be back in a minute."

    He came back and still looked puzzled. Told me my record was clean, which I acknowledged. I told him I would be commuting that highway every day for the next few months, and if he clocked me going over the limit he could ticket me and I wouldn't dispute it. Once again, he gave me that puzzled look, then handed me my license and bid me a good day.

    :celebrate

    Lesson for the day -- honesty often works.

    Charles


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    NavyLT wrote:
    .........."Do you know how fast you were going?"
    No speedometer of my car shows only upto 160 m/h...I was past that.......:P. on serious note I would never declare my CPL unless askedor asked to step out of my car and I am carrying

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    The best way to handle it, IMHO, is to not add too much information unless it becomes necessary to do so. Offering your CPL is a nice gesture, but may cause undue alarm in the officer's mind that he may be in iminent danger (even though you have a CPL and have been cleared to carry concealed). Anything that makes the process smoother and positive is best.
    When the **** hits the fan, ask yourself: What Would Bugly Do?

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    Keep in mind that I last worked as a "street cop" in a must-declare state, so it's second nature for me- from both sides of the equation.
    "There is NO timer in a gunfight, but there IS another guy with a gun, and he's probably in a hurry!"- from someone who bothered to go and check

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    Charles Paul Lincoln wrote:
    Lesson for the day -- honesty often works.
    I had a similar experience with a Bothell PD officer about 9 years ago. I was coming off the 405 off ramp that dumps into Bothell and about 500 feet past the big triangle lane divider there at the 522 entrance he pulls out after me. I knew he was probably after me since I hadn't slowed down quite as hard as I should have in that area that is marked 35. I pulled into the Bothell P&R so we didn't have to contend with traffic. I had my wife with me, and the back of my SUV was full of cloths and other camping stuff because we had just come back from a road trip. I park in a parking spot, he parks cross by back end in the lane, drivers side to the back of my car.

    The officer gets out and walks slowly up to the window, he seemed to be confused that I parked in the P&R at first. I put down my window, but don't get out.

    BPO: "Evening sir, License and registration please."

    Me: "Sure officer, here you are."

    BPO: "Do you know why I pulled you over?"

    Me: "Probably because I was still moving a bit fast after coming down the off ramp."

    BPO: {He pauses and blinks} "Yes... do you know how fast you were going?"

    Me: "About the time I passed you, I figure about 48. I apologize, and realize I should have been on the brake a bit harder."

    BPO: {He pauses and blinks again, almost a look of slight confusion, looks at my wife and the stuff I have packed in the car, and simply says} "Yes" {Pauses again and looks at my licenses} "Hold tight ok, Il be right back."

    Me: "Yes sir."

    BPO: {About 90 seconds pass and he comes back from his car, looks around when he comes back to the window} "Sir, how come you waited so long to pull over when I got behind you?"

    Me: {I shrug} "I knew the park and ride was up here and I figured it was a safer area for both of us for this kind of encounter."

    BPO: {He pauses and considers that for a moment, then he nods and hands me back my licenses and registration} "Thanks for your honesty, slow down a bit in the future and you have a pleasant rest of your night."

    Me: "Very welcome, and you too sir."

    The end..

    I had my 1911 loaded in my backpack behind my seat, but I don't tell officers I am armed unless it may become an issue. Don't make an issue about something that isn't an issue. Its not required by law in this state to notify, so as long as I am sure they are not going to find it "by surprise" I just keep the term "I have a gun..." to myself.

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    I had the unhappy experience of being pulled over asked to exit my vehicle, frisked, disarmed and cuffed by a Pierce county Sheriff. There were two Sheriffs cars and both officers had their weapons drawn. I did not argue or say anything except to say that I had a cpl for the Colt .45 that I had been carrying concealed. They removed my wallet and looked at my license and cpl and then began to read me my rights. Part way through the reading of the rights a call came across their radios stating that the suspect in the armed robbery was 6'4" tall. I'm 5'8" tall. The officer that was reading me my rights stopped and asked his partner to get clarification. The partner radioed in and asked for a repeat of the description of the wanted individual. I was more than a little surprised to hear what came back over the radio. The armed robber was driving a blue Jeep Wagoneer, had short hair with a several day old beard, was armed with a black or dark blue semi-automatic handgun, was wearing an old military field jacket and was 6'4" tall. I fit that description perfectly except for being 5'8" tall. The two Sheriffs looked at each other, un cuffed me and returned my weapon. They both immediately began to apologize and were trying to explain their actions. Feeling somewhat bold and alot relieved at this point I interupted them and told them that I would have done exactly the same thing if I were in their shoes. They were both very professional and did not use excessive force in any way. They thanked me for understanding and I replied that I was just glad I was short. We all laughed and we all went our separate ways.

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    Regular Member shad0wfax's Avatar
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    Stoked wrote:
    [SNIP] He drove off and I sat there for like another minute, waiting for another cop, like in that movie Super Troopers or something.

    Weird being on the other side of the badge.
    Do you know how fast you were going?

    65?

    64...

    But the speed limit's 65...



    hahahah That movie is great.

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