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Thread: ATF raids Wallingford mobile home

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    http://www.myrecordjournal.com/site/...2709&rfi=6

    05/15/2009 ATF raids Wallingford mobile home By: Mary Ellen Godin , Record-Journal staff

    WALLINGFORD - A usually quiet mobile home park was shaken Friday morning when about 15 officers from the U.S. bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and local police descended on one of their neighbor's homes with force.

    "They had their guns drawn and were surrounding the house," said Jennifer Monroe of Hosford Bridge Road. "These weren't small guns, they were machine guns. It wasn't normal."

    Lynne Boynton, of 15 Hosford Bridge Road, went to her husband's truck for coffee money at about 6 a.m. and was pushed to the driveway and handcuffed with an officer's knee in her back and a gun to her head.

    ATF officers surrounded her father-in-law's home at Western Sands Mobile Home Park and used a battering ram to enter the unlocked home in the rear, Boynton said.

    "They were pouring out of there like crazy," said Monroe, who can easily see the front door. "They had Lynne in handcuffs. We were like 'What are they looking for?' "

    Once inside, officers pulled Gilman Boynton and Paul Boynton out of bed, the men said. Paul Boynton said three or four officers threw him to the floor and put a gun to his head. Gilman Boynton, 76, who suffers from a heart condition, was made to sit in the living room, he said.

    "Don't I have any rights?" a visibly shaken Gilman Boynton said. "I've been living here for over 40 years. The police have been here and seen my guns."

    The family was told by ATF officers that the agency received a tip six weeks ago that a convicted felon was living at the home and had access to guns, Lynne Boynton said. Paul Boynton was arrested 34 years ago at the age of 17 with a friend who had forged a check. He hasn't been arrested since, he said.

    Gilman Boynton is a gun collector, who keeps his rifles in a locked case on the wall, and a Beretta pistol in a safe. On Friday, ATF officers confiscated 14 rifles from the gun case and took his permits, he said. After breaking the safe, the ATF officers left the Beretta with a magazine cartridge still in the safe in Boynton's dresser.

    "If they are so worried about guns, why did they leave a pistol in the safe and the holster?" Lynne Boynton said. "It was humiliating; I've never been handcuffed in my life."

    According to a search and seizure warrant signed by U.S. District Court Judge Joan G. Margolis in New Haven Thursday, the agents were authorized to seize firearms, ammunition, holsters and destructive devices. They were also looking for personal property that identified the residents, including canceled mail, deeds, leases, rental agreements, photographs, personal telephone books, diaries, utility and telephone bills, statements, identification documents and keys.

    The confiscated guns and the arrest warrant must be presented to Margolis in court.

    There were no arrests during Friday's raid.

    Paul Boynton said he is not a gun enthusiast and didn't make the connection between his 34-year-old conviction and his father's collection.

    "This could have been handled so much easier," Boynton said. "All they had to do was have an officer come to my door and tell me."

    The Boynton's rear door was bashed and has to be secured. Garbage bags, clothing, jewelry, a television and other household items were dumped in heaps in the various rooms. Paul Boynton, who suffers from herniated discs and other back problems, was having difficulty walking.

    The officers called a medic for Gilman Boynton to check his vital signs, and asked if he wanted to be hospitalized. He refused.

    "At the end of it when they didn't find nothing, they were real nice," Gilman Boynton said.

    Neighbor Natalie Monroe, mother of Jennifer, said in the 21 years she's lived there, she's never seen any disturbances across the street and was shaken at the sight of her neighbor lying in her driveway in handcuffs. She was also concerned about the effects all the excitement would have on Gilman Boynton's health.

    "We were floored," Natalie Monroe said. "We were like what the heck is going on? I've never seen anything like this. They went through all their vehicles."

    A Wallingford Police Department detective said the department sent several officers to the scene at the request of the ATF. But the department had no knowledge of the details in the case, and referred questions to the bureau. Telephone messages left at the ATF's field offices in New Haven and Boston were not returned.

    The officers told the family that Paul Boynton could still be arrested because the keys to the gun rack were hanging up in the kitchen, Lynne Boynton said.

    "But I had to help them open it," Gilman Boynton said.


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    Disgusting. What is even more disgusting is the county sheriff let this crap go down in his county too.

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    If they are so worried about guns, why did they leave a pistol in the safe and the holster?" Lynne Boynton said. "It was humiliating; I've never been handcuffed in my life.
    Very good question.

    Is it really illegal to have a firearm in your house if someone living there is a felon? If that's true then by living with a felon you're losing your rights because of someone else's misconduct.

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    What the really disgusting part of it is, is that the "crime" involved in this deal was 34 years ago and the person was 17 and that should have been a Juvenile thing. And a bad check, that his friend had written? Boys and girls the sounds like to me the ATF is digging deep to come up with reasons to begin the confiscation game. Keep watching, it's gonna get worse.
    Keep your powder dry !
    ‘‘Laws that forbid the carrying of arms... disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes... Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.’’ Thomas Jefferson

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    Regular Member MetalChris's Avatar
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    How much more of this crap are we going to take? I'll tell you how much.

    A lot more, and it's only going to get worse. You know what else? Nobody's going to do a ******* thing about it.

    Welkome to the police state of Amerika.

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    Tekman wrote:
    [snip]

    The family was told by ATF officers that the agency received a tip six weeks ago that a convicted felon was living at the home and had access to guns, Lynne Boynton said. Paul Boynton was arrested 34 years ago at the age of 17 with a friend who had forged a check. He hasn't been arrested since, he said.
    That sounds suspiciously like the cases we've seenwhere it turned out thatthe informant was eithermistaken or deliberately lying or the police got the wrong address.

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    N00blet45 wrote:
    Is it really illegal to have a firearm in your house if someone living there is a felon?
    No.

    It is illegal for a "prohibited person" (any felon; any "domestic violence" misdemeanant; anyone addicted to, or an unlawful user of, illegal drugs) to possess, or to have "constructive possession" of any firearm or ammunition.

    Constructive possession means the person could have unrestricted access -- they know the combination to the safe, or where the keys to the locker are kept.

    Ammo is the biggest problem, because most people don't lock up their ammo, just their guns.

    Whether the son in this case was actually a convicted felon remains to be seen. The article only says that he was arrested 34 years ago.



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    This is exactly why felonies should be reclassified to their "heinous crime" status, such as robbery, rape, or murder. All other lesser crimes should be reclassified as misdemeanors.

    That way you won't hear of Gestapo ATF raids on people other than the violent felons, the kind that you would expect the ATF to bust through doors with automatic rifles blazing, not fraudulent check writers, and throwing old people with heart conditions to the ground.

    Oh, wait. That's right, bad check writers are DANGEROUS people!

    Contact your local representatives, both state and federal, and ask them to reclassify non-violent, non-heinous felonies to misdemeanors, and we can rid ourselves of this problem.

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    Read Atlas Shrugged. Atlas is shrugging. Who is John Galt? Anony Mouse the patriot is not.

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    Doug Huffman wrote:
    Read Atlas Shrugged. Atlas is shrugging. Who is John Galt? Anony Mouse the patriot is not.
    Skip Atlas Shrugged, read The Fountainhead if you desire to read Rand, but take (as with all extreme viewpoints) it with a grain of salt. While I enjoyed the underlying message in both, I think Atlas Shrugged went a bit far in that it began to remove choice. It equated the willful giving or act of charitable doing to be evil. Moreover, Galt's infamously long winded speech contains numerous logical errors (A = A, therefore gold is the only acceptable standard as a basis of currency, for example). Much better to see Roark struggling to live his life by those terms he finds true than sell out to others' desires.
    "If we were to ever consider citizenship as the least bit matter of merit instead of birthright, imagine who should be selected as deserved representation of our democracy: someone who would risk their daily livelihood to cast an individually statistically insignificant vote, or those who wrap themselves in the flag against slightest slights." - agenthex

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    Tawnos wrote:
    Skip Atlas Shrugged, read The Fountainhead if you desire to read Rand, but take (as with all extreme viewpoints) it with a grain of salt. While I enjoyed the underlying message in both, I think Atlas Shrugged went a bit far in that it began to remove choice. It equated the willful giving or act of charitable doing to be evil. Moreover, Galt's infamously long winded speech contains numerous logical errors (A = A, therefore gold is the only acceptable standard as a basis of currency, for example). Much better to see Roark struggling to live his life by those terms he finds true than sell out to others' desires.
    I agree that The Fountainhead is a far better book. I've read Atlas four or five times, and I've never made it more than five pages into "This is John Galt Speaking" before skipping to the next chapter.

    I think you misunderstood the message about altruism, though. Rand didn't condemn charity, she explained that altruism is a myth and a logical falsehood. Charitable giving that acknowledges selfish desire is just fine. Pretending to give selflessly is a lie, because those who makes this pretense are actually motivated by emotion.

    Give charitably because it makes you feel good. Give charitably because it's in your rational self interest to live in a society where help is available to people who suffer an emergency. Give charitably because your business improves when you have an educated public. Don't give and claim to do so selflessly, because enjoying the air of moral superiority is disproof of the "selflessness".

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    KBCraig wrote:
    Tawnos wrote:
    Skip Atlas Shrugged, read The Fountainhead if you desire to read Rand, but take (as with all extreme viewpoints) it with a grain of salt. While I enjoyed the underlying message in both, I think Atlas Shrugged went a bit far in that it began to remove choice. It equated the willful giving or act of charitable doing to be evil. Moreover, Galt's infamously long winded speech contains numerous logical errors (A = A, therefore gold is the only acceptable standard as a basis of currency, for example). Much better to see Roark struggling to live his life by those terms he finds true than sell out to others' desires.
    I agree that The Fountainhead is a far better book. I've read Atlas four or five times, and I've never made it more than five pages into "This is John Galt Speaking" before skipping to the next chapter.

    I think you misunderstood the message about altruism, though. Rand didn't condemn charity, she explained that altruism is a myth and a logical falsehood. Charitable giving that acknowledges selfish desire is just fine. Pretending to give selflessly is a lie, because those who makes this pretense are actually motivated by emotion.

    Give charitably because it makes you feel good. Give charitably because it's in your rational self interest to live in a society where help is available to people who suffer an emergency. Give charitably because your business improves when you have an educated public. Don't give and claim to do so selflessly, because enjoying the air of moral superiority is disproof of the "selflessness".
    What you say is the message conveyed through Objectivism, but I think the characters in Atlas Shrugged speak differently. Dagny calls charity the opposite of justice, and one of the guys in Galt's Gulch (the miner?) says something about how nothing is to ever be given away. It's been a couple years since reading it, but I remember that parts of the book didn't seem to align with Rand's own words:

    My views on charity are very simple. I do not consider it a major virtue and, above all, I do not consider it a moral duty. There is nothing wrong in helping other people, if and when they are worthy of the help and you can afford to help them. I regard charity as a marginal issue. What I am fighting is the idea that charity is a moral duty and a primary virtue.
    Hence the reason I think the Fountainhead is better - it focuses on the individual, the strength of Objectivism, and not how that individual interacts with society, arguably a weakness of Objectivism.
    "If we were to ever consider citizenship as the least bit matter of merit instead of birthright, imagine who should be selected as deserved representation of our democracy: someone who would risk their daily livelihood to cast an individually statistically insignificant vote, or those who wrap themselves in the flag against slightest slights." - agenthex

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    KBCraig wrote:
    N00blet45 wrote:
    Is it really illegal to have a firearm in your house if someone living there is a felon?
    No.

    It is illegal for a "prohibited person" (any felon; any "domestic violence" misdemeanant; anyone addicted to, or an unlawful user of, illegal drugs) to possess, or to have "constructive possession" of any firearm or ammunition.

    Constructive possession means the person could have unrestricted access -- they know the combination to the safe, or where the keys to the locker are kept.

    Ammo is the biggest problem, because most people don't lock up their ammo, just their guns.

    Whether the son in this case was actually a convicted felon remains to be seen. The article only says that he was arrested 34 years ago.

    Wait a minute. So, if I havefamily members or friendsvisiting who areforeign citizens on a tourist visa(and therefore cannot posess guns) I have to lock up every freaking round of ammo and keep it locked the whole time I don't have animmideate control over it???

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    Whatcha gonna do when they come for you...

    Bad Boys Bad Boys....

    Whatcha gonna do....

    The cops song seems appropriate to describe cops rather than those they're terrorizing.


    Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company. ~ George Washington

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    I thought it was incumbent upon the felon not to be around guns. Why is the non-criminal being blamed? I was aware of the doctrine of "constructive possession" but had thought that it applied to the prohibited person. Oops.

    ed - sorry I read that wrong. I thought they were going to lock up the old man. Still, they shouldn't have taken his stuff. Either secure it, or remove the "prohibited person." Problem solved, and without uneccesary drama and infliction of distress - unless that's their real aim. Nothing like an injection of the surreal for good reality programming.

    -ljp

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    The out of control BATFE needs to be comlpetely shut down, and all employee'a barred from government service or law enforcement.
    "Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death !" Patrick Henry

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    MI-copperhead wrote:
    The out of control BATFE needs to be comlpetely shut down, and all employee'a barred from government service or law enforcement.

    I'd take mafia over BATFE anytime. At least mafia normally doesn't bother regular folks, they just play their own game... This is out of freaking control...

    P.S.You often hear storiesof local cops moderately harrasing someone at traffic stop and then the harrased person sue local PD and wins. How comesyou never hear that about ATF after they break into someones house and abuse innocent people for no real reason? Are feds untouchable or what?

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    MI-copperhead wrote:
    The out of control BATFE needs to be comlpetely shut down, and all employee'a barred from government service or law enforcement.
    Agreed.... along with every other Federal Bureaucracy including the FBI, FDA, FCC, FDIC, Dept of Education, Dept of Agriculture, Dept of Housing and Urban Development, National Science Foundation, National Renewable Energy Labs, Department of Energy, Department of Labor et al. Every single one including the BATFE are unconstitutional making every single action taken by their employees treason.
    Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company. ~ George Washington

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    Washintonian_For_Liberty wrote:
    MI-copperhead wrote:
    The out of control BATFE needs to be comlpetely shut down, and all employee'a barred from government service or law enforcement.
    Agreed.... along with every other Federal Bureaucracy including the FBI, FDA, FCC, FDIC, Dept of Education, Dept of Agriculture, Dept of Housing and Urban Development, National Science Foundation, National Renewable Energy Labs, Department of Energy, Department of Labor et al. Every single one including the BATFE are unconstitutional making every single action taken by their employees treason.
    You forgot the worst of all evils - the IRS

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    Chaingun81 wrote:
    Washintonian_For_Liberty wrote:
    MI-copperhead wrote:
    The out of control BATFE needs to be comlpetely shut down, and all employee'a barred from government service or law enforcement.
    Agreed.... along with every other Federal Bureaucracy including the FBI, FDA, FCC, FDIC, Dept of Education, Dept of Agriculture, Dept of Housing and Urban Development, National Science Foundation, National Renewable Energy Labs, Department of Energy, Department of Labor et al. Every single one including the BATFE are unconstitutional making every single action taken by their employees treason.
    You forgot the worst of all evils - the IRS
    While I really hate the IRS, it has legitimacy within the Constitution... none of the others I mentioned have any legitimacy.
    Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company. ~ George Washington

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    "...and took his permits,"

    Maybe this raid was a product of gun laws requiring permits? You know, idle hands sifting through it's playground of information looking forand contemplating possibilities?

    less permits =less raids ? Or am I missing something?

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    Welcome to OCDO.

    Of course less permits would equal less problems with this particular agency.

    Problem is this agency doesn't really care what's legal and what's not.

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    Thank you. Been reading awhile and was quite inspired by Parabellum's saga. The Wis PI was a hoot!

    My only point is less info in their hands to act on would be a good thingexactly because they don't care about the legal aspect until forced by court - if that even happens.A nip in the bud at the source. So many people don't realize they willingly hand over the means for everyone's demise by not seeing this danger in registration, permitting,etc. and voting for it to happen.

    When I bought my latest pistol and showed it to my 30 yr old marine son heasked if it was "all legally registered". It took a bit for me to explain things. He was surprised at what I told him. It gave me an insight into how uneducated the general public is - being in the military seems to get people used to gun control. At least hesaid he got itand saw what I meant. Then he went and bought a P-07 Duty to join me at the range.



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    Agreed, less they know the better.

    I dont really believe being in the military gets you used to gun control, not if you already were all for gun rights before you joined anyway.

    Well, my experience is limited to the army, so i cant speak for the Marine Corps. They'd probably hunt me down if i tried.

    Course, ive only got close to a year under my belt, so maybe it is true, but people who know me will hear my version of the truth anyway.

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    Well,I don't know for sure either but if you only get to wear a gun when they say you can then after a whileit kinda seems/ingrains that's the way it should be: "I must have someone else's permission."" I can't be trusted with a gun without supervision, etc. etc." How many strap one on on base? Only the authorized on-duty guys? Seems like a very gun-controlled oriented structure.

    Maybe I'm wrong but that's the gist I got after talking to him on this subject.A lot of assumptions that some gun regulatons we are fightingare already the law.I don't have to be right about that it's just my current take on it.My #2 son is also a Marine and is unaware of these things. I'll bring them along as I can. It hasn't really been a subject `til lately. #1 is on board with open carry.

    anyways back to the subject of the thread - I will always try to explain the danger of permits, registration and other such intrusions to my family and friends when the subject arises. Fortunately for me the ones that matter think more like me than not so it's easy to get their support. I only had to askonce forthem to sign the open carry petition for Texas with the merest of talk about it.

    Sorry, I'm familiar with Semper Fi for Marinesbut not the Army's but if I knew the Army's version I'd sign off with that for ya . Thanks for serving and protecting. I much appreciate it!

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