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Thread: CHL revocation?

  1. #1
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    I'm AD USAF and stationed in Georgia, I do not have my CHL yet but plain to obtain one the next time I come home on leave.

    I will not re-enlist at the end of my term in 2012(6 yr enlistee). I'm told when you hit your DOS you immediately become a resident of the state your currently living in irregardless of your HOR.

    No matter if I'm still stationed in Ga or not I initially plan to go wherever the best paying job is so that I can save up some $$$ in order to start a ranch in eastern Oregon a few more years down the road.

    Sooo, If I'm not in Oregon the day I hit my DOS and I instantly lose my residency will my CHL instantly become null and void??

    If yes to previous:Say I do find a decent paying job for the wife andI in Oregon but,we're still in the moving process on my DOS; Will my CHL become void as well, forcing me to apply for a new CHL upon settling in to Oregon? Would I have to wait for the six month residency affirmation period first?

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    Hi..
    I hate it when people use acronyms and assume everyone know what the hell there talking about.

    CHL, I will ASSUME you mean a permit to carry.
    DOS There is about 50 listed on the acronym search, so I have no clue.

    Please retype this in plan English.


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    Jeffytune wrote:
    Hi..
    I hate it when people use acronyms and assume everyone know what the hell there talking about.

    CHL, I will ASSUME you mean a permit to carry.
    DOS There is about 50 listed on the acronym search, so I have no clue.

    Please retype this in plan English.
    Cool the attitude man, chill

    CHL=Concealed Handgun License
    DOS=Date of service(or something similar); the day my enlistment is up.
    HOR=Home of Residency

    If you don't know what a CHL is then I most likely don't want your opinion, if you don't even know what the proper name for an Oregon carry license is then I assume you don't know much about carry in Oregon in the first place.

    With the sentence that I used DOS in it's pretty easy to identify what it means, try reading the whole sentence at once instead of stopping at the acronym like a confused deer with headlights in its face.

    I hate how many acronyms we use as well, but it's beginning to be instilled in me.

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    jerg_064 wrote:
    Jeffytune wrote:
    Hi..
    I hate it when people use acronyms and assume everyone know what the hell there talking about.

    CHL, I will ASSUME you mean a permit to carry.
    DOS There is about 50 listed on the acronym search, so I have no clue.

    Please retype this in plan English.
    Cool the attitude man, chill

    CHL=Concealed Handgun License
    DOS=Date of service(or something similar); the day my enlistment is up.
    HOR=Home of Residency

    If you don't know what a CHL is then I most likely don't want your opinion, if you don't even know what the proper name for an Oregon carry license is then I assume you don't know much about carry in Oregon in the first place.

    With the sentence that I used DOS in it's pretty easy to identify what it means, try reading the whole sentence at once instead of stopping at the acronym like a confused deer with headlights in its face.

    I hate how many acronyms we use as well, but it's beginning to be instilled in me.
    Sorry, long day.
    So if I get what you asking, what there telling you is, the day you leave the service, then state your in becomes the state you live in, right?
    Well, it does make since, being you are physically there and all.
    But I think for residency, you need to get a drivers license, rent, pay utility bills or have a job that has you paying income tax as a resident of the state.

    If it were me, and I wanted to be a Oregon resident, I would have a plane ticket in hand when they gave me my papers, and a taxi ready to take me to the airport.
    The Day ain't over until it's midnight, and if you are standing in Oregon, then I would say your a resident of that state.

    Check with them again, and ask if that would be correct, if not, and it is were you sign your discharge papers, ask if they can be sent to Portland so you can sign them there.

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    DOS = Date of Separation

    And don't be too hard on him, our military world is rife with acronyms that we cant even keep straight half the time. Reading your average message release is oftentimes an exercise in futility.

    God & Google save me...:quirky

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    [/b] 166.295 Renewal of license.[/b] (1)(a) A concealed handgun license is renewable by repeating the procedures set out in ORS 166.291 and 166.292, except for the requirement to submit fingerprints and provide character references. A licensee may submit the application for renewal by mail if the licensee:[/b]
    (A) Is an active member of the Armed Forces of the United States, the National Guard of the United States or the Oregon National Guard; and
    (B) Submits with the application proof of the licensee’s military orders and a copy of the licensee’s military identification.
    (b) An otherwise expired concealed handgun license continues to be valid for up to 45 days after the licensee applies for renewal if:
    (A) The licensee applies for renewal before the original license expires;
    (B) The licensee has proof of the application for renewal; and
    (C) The application for renewal has not been denied.
    (2) If a licensee changes residence, the licensee shall report the change of address and the sheriff shall issue a new license as a duplication for a change of address. The license shall expire upon the same date as would the original. [1989 c.839 §10; 1993 c.735 §7; 2007 c.368 §4]
    http://www.leg.state.or.us/ors/166.html

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    Regular Member Sonora Rebel's Avatar
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    'Took over a year afterI retired from the Navy for the beach creatures to understand whatI was saying. The acronyms and initialisms become part of your lexicon. DOS (Air Force) is EAOS (Navy)... so there's even disparities there.

    I thought all 'legal' permits 'n license 'n such had a 30 day continuance upon separation? Not 'immediate'. I dunno... I've lived in Oregon for a bit...Weather sucks... 'n too many liberals 'n old hippies.

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    Sonora Rebel wrote:
    I've lived in Oregon for a bit...Weather sucks... 'n too many liberals 'n old hippies.
    85 and sunny today, not a cloud in the sky, but you learn to appreciate days like these.
    Yes, the libs are fun to watch sometimes....:what:

    But it sure beats the hell out of living a heated oversized sand box.

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    I think that's wrong about you losing your residency. I can put on my OR DL that I live in NY for where I'm stationed, but to make things simpler when I get out it has my father's address on it, so I don't have to do much to get it fixed after I leave. But just because you leave the service doesn't change your state of residence.

    Oh yeah, for the Army, just to add to the confusion, it's ETS when we get out it means expiration of term of service.

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    FMCDH wrote:
    DOS = Date of Separation
    Yea, I just didn't feel like editing. Also HOR=Home of Record.I think thecombination of being on nightshift and in Iraq is messing with my ability to think.

    Sonora Rebel wrote:
    I've lived in Oregon for a bit...Weather sucks... 'n too many liberals 'n old hippies.
    You were just on the wrong side of the Cascades. You gotta go out past Bend to the Blue mountains. There's still plenty of tokin' hippies, but their not liberal; most hunt and work for a living. However them western Oregonians posessed my sister after she went to Willamette, now I'm pretty sure she's retarded.



    Anyho, I didn't really look up the AFI/REG I just took it as a rumour from a Ret. MSgt that stayed down in Georgiaand said it happened to him. But he owned a house there, was married w/kids,and already had a job lined up so it may be different.

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    jerg_064 wrote:
    I will not re-enlist at the end of my term in 2012(6 yr enlistee). I'm told when you hit your DOS you immediately become a resident of the state your currently living in irregardless of your HOR.
    The term "home of record" is a military term of little utility in the real world - it basicly captures where you entered service and affects the distance the military will move your household goods when you end your service.

    There are 2 types of residence: actual residence and legal residence (AKA state citizenship, AKA domicile) - these need not be the same regardless of whether or not you are in the military.

    One's state citizenship is inhereted from your father upon reaching the age of majority, thereafter you self claim it, however the claim can be questioned if your contacts with that state have been minimal and your intent to return to the state is not clear.

    Bottom line is that a military person often has a home of record which is not the same as the actual state of residence which is also not the same as the person's legal residence.

    So3 points to take away - first, home of record is a meaningless term in the real world. Second, actual residence is easy to establish - you live there, sleep there, etc. Legal residence, easy to claim, but sometimes challenged.

    Finally, when analyzing state law residency restrictions, you must carefully determine whether the state law refers to actual residence or legal residence, or both.

    Fun stuff, eh?

  12. #12
    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    As for your Oregon CHL, just make sure to notify the issuing County Sheriff's office (in writing) of what your intentions are at least 2 months before the end of your enlistment. The ORS I posted earlier should make it clear you have 45 days AFTER the expiration date of your permit as long as you make it clear you started the process of renewing.

    It doesn't matter much where you plan to live as long as you renew before the expiration date is up. Remember, Oregon is a shall issue state to residents and may-issue of contiguous states, but that has more to do with the initial issuance of the permit, and most County Sheriffs don't care where your living on renewal of a permit from the discussions I have with many of them.

    See this page for a wealth of information on Oregon CHLs...
    http://www.oregonfirearms.org/chlcentral/

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    HOR is not totally meaningless if your still enlisted in the Mil. For one, I do not have to pay my state ofactual residenceincome taxes while I'm a resident there. And I do live off base.

    Secondly, With Oregon law, AD does not have to pay Oregon income tax while stationed outside of Oregon. You either get a full refund back, or simply file exempt. My legal residence will never be challenged so long as I'm AD. I can still get my CHL, in both states. Not that I even need one(GFL) in Ga.

    Also I have my registration fees partially waved down there since I'm not a legal resident, I still need to get that fixed and put some Oregon plates on the stang like my pick-up though.There are more benefits/problems.

    I'm not a civilian, but I'm pretty sure I've been living in the "real world" since I'm Air Force. Work stateside usually is a 9-5 job and I leavebase every afternoon. I get the point you were making, that I simply need to be aware of the laws so I don't get caught up in anythin that'll cost me, and apprieciate it. But I highly disagree that one's HOR is meaningless.

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    jerg_064 wrote:
    HOR is not totally meaningless if your still enlisted in the Mil. For one, I do not have to pay my state ofactual residenceincome taxes while I'm a resident there. And I do live off base.

    Secondly, With Oregon law, AD does not have to pay Oregon income tax while stationed outside of Oregon. You either get a full refund back, or simply file exempt. My legal residence will never be challenged so long as I'm AD. I can still get my CHL, in both states. Not that I even need one(GFL) in Ga.

    Also I have my registration fees partially waved down there since I'm not a legal resident, I still need to get that fixed and put some Oregon plates on the stang like my pick-up though.There are more benefits/problems.

    I'm not a civilian, but I'm pretty sure I've been living in the "real world" since I'm Air Force. Work stateside usually is a 9-5 job and I leavebase every afternoon. I get the point you were making, that I simply need to be aware of the laws so I don't get caught up in anythin that'll cost me, and apprieciate it. But I highly disagree that one's HOR is meaningless.
    You are mistaking home of record for state of domicile - it is your state of domicile which you are referring to.


  15. #15
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    What service are/were you in? Because from my understanding and way of living, their are one in the same. My HOR is the only proof I have of my state of domicile. HOR is what I have to use in any legal or financial matters to show Oregon as my state of domicle.

    Perhaps different services treat things differently, If not, I believe further explaination on your part is needed to prove your point.

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