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Thread: Locking and Securing (at home or in car)

  1. #1
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    Hello everyone. Been reading the site for a couple weeks and have now joined the party!

    I am fairly new to the world of guns (have owned a hand gun for a few years, but really got into them less than a year ago). I think I am pretty well read, but I don't have the knowlege of specs and it takes me a little while to process the short hand here, but it is getting better.

    Now to my question: I know there are a few types of locks to secure a firearm in the home and car, but which do you prefer? Any tips or tricks? Other advice to keep them from the kiddos?

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    Welcome to OCDO

    A locked gun cannot be used for self-defense, the only reason I have for having one.

    I kept a Luger unchambered through my child's lifetime, depending on the difficulty of toggling a round. YMMV I don't believe that today, as an adult, she could toggle it.

    Good luck and GOoD blessings for being a responsible parent.

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    Agreed 100 %. A locked away gun is even less useful than a hammer.

    I don't care how you try to lock it up, you cannot "child proof" a gun, however, you can gun proof a child through diligence and teaching. Young children are naturally masters at opening locks.

    Make sure that from their very youngest days they see you carefully properly handle the gun. As soon as they show any curiosity, take them to the range to see what a gun can do (if your range allows, gallon jugs of red jello are very effective for this). As soon as they are strong enough, let them shoot. Let them know that anytime they want, you will take them to the range to shoot.

    Kids who are taught how to properly handle a gun and what a gun will do are kids that are safe with guns.

    Remember to teach the three simple rules:

    1. Every gun is loaded. Period. I don't care if you just checked it yourself, treat it like it is loaded.

    2. Never point a gun at anything you don't intend to destroy.

    3. Keep your finger outside the trigger guard until you are ready to fire.


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    The safest place for a handgun in regards to child safety is in a retention holster on your hip.

    Not sure of the OC laws in NC, but if it's on your hip you kid won't be getting at it.

    It also allows your kid to become familiar with the presence of a gun. If it is something that is normal and familiar, then the curiosity monster won't come to life in regards to the gun when your kid starts getting into things.

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    While I understand that homes are broken into while they are occupied it does not happen so often that every homeownerneeds to have a loaded gun at their fingertips at all times. And most of the time... the bad guyruns away when the homeowner is discovered inside. A gun was not even required!

    If you feel the need to have such quick access to a firearm... why not carry it at all times. What good is a loaded and unsecured gun if it is not in your shooting hand?

    IMO... Leaving an unsecured gun in your home is a bad practice.You are not going to be hovering over it at all times to prevent a guest, family member,or child from locating it.

    Just because somethinghappened to someone else it does not mean it is going to happen to you too. If that were the case.. you cannot pick and choosesafety. You musttake action for every possible risk based on the fact that it has happened to others.

    So you will need more than a gun. You need a ballistic vest, full body armor, Kevlar helmet, a ballistic shield, gas mask, bulletproof windows, armored vehicle, and more!!!

    Have a gun and be prepared... But also beresponsible. :P

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    LEO 229 wrote:
    While I understand that homes are broken into while they are occupied it does not happen so often that every homeownerneeds to have a loaded gun at their fingertips at all times. And most of the time... the bad guyruns away when the homeowner is discovered inside. A gun was not even required!

    If you feel the need to have such quick access to a firearm... why not carry it at all times. What good is a loaded and unsecured gun if it is not in your shooting hand?

    IMO... Leaving an unsecured gun in your home is a bad practice.You are not going to be hovering over it at all times to prevent a guest, family member,or child from locating it.

    Just because somethinghappened to someone else it does not mean it is going to happen to you too. If that were the case.. you cannot pick and choosesafety. You musttake action for every possible risk based on the fact that it has happened to others.

    So you will need more than a gun. You need a ballistic vest, full body armor, Kevlar helmet, a ballistic shield, gas mask, bulletproof windows, armored vehicle, and more!!!

    Have a gun and be prepared... But also beresponsible. :P
    And, the times they do are....?

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    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    LEO 229 wrote:
    While I understand that homes are broken into while they are occupied it does not happen so often that every homeownerneeds to have a loaded gun at their fingertips at all times. And most of the time... the bad guyruns away when the homeowner is discovered inside. A gun was not even required!
    And, the times they do are....?
    I stopped being surprised attheshear stupidity ofhaving cops act like mind readers in regards to the safety of other people a long time ago.



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    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    And, the times they do are....?
    If you want to play the "what if" game.. you have come to the right place.

    Iknow from actual calls for service that situations at homedo not happen that often where you need a gun in your hands thatquickly. Most calls have ample time to go get a gun and present it. Very rare situations require a gun in fractions of a second.

    In any event... My point was that you need to be responsible. Imagining the worst is going to happen is not a valid excuse to leave a loaded gun unsecured where others can get it that should not.

    Play the "what" if" games if that helps to justify your reason to leave out a loaded gun. I only hope that your responsible child, trained in guns, does not bring over a friend one day while you are away. The friend finds the gunand starts playing with it while your child begs for him to put it down.Then a child gets shot and killed by accident.

    Sorry, I have seen it happen a few times already. I sure hope the gun owner felt good knowinghe was "safe from crime" having that gun out unsecured and ready for action. He could care less about the gun being access by others... including the burglar while he was gone.

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    les_aker wrote:
    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    LEO 229 wrote:
    While I understand that homes are broken into while they are occupied it does not happen so often that every homeownerneeds to have a loaded gun at their fingertips at all times. And most of the time... the bad guyruns away when the homeowner is discovered inside. A gun was not even required!
    And, the times they do are....?
    I stopped being surprised attheshear stupidity ofhaving cops act like mind readers in regards to the safety of other people a long time ago.

    And I have stopped being surprised at how people over-react and become paranoid to events that do not happen that often.

    Excuse me while I return to my bunker. I need to rotate my stock of MREs and check the water levels.

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    dvdaughtry wrote:
    Snipped....

    Now to my question: I know there are a few types of locks to secure a firearm in the home and car, but which do you prefer? Any tips or tricks? Other advice to keep them from the kiddos?
    Getting to your post.....

    If you are interested in being able to secure your firearms when not "in use" it is probably best to put them in a container that cannot be opened easily. There are many out there that are thin and a screwdriver could pry them open.

    Foryour car... I have seen people opt for cable locks and even handcuffs.. as if!!

    The cable locks that are supplied with new gun can easily be removed. YouTube has a few videos of a kid cracking them.

    I know a few members herehave bought a metal container that secures to the interior of the vehicle. They can be hard mounted or use a solid cable looped under the seat. Maybe a few can recommend a product they have used and trust.

    I have not yet bought a storage unit for my car. I am still looking for something I like.

    At home I have a Fort Knox safe and a wall safe with quick push button mechanical access. I can open it in complete darkness in under2 seconds.


  11. #11
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    Do you have link or something to the wall safe? That sounds like it works, espcially if its opperable in the dark.

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    LEO 229 wrote:
    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    And, the times they do are....?
    If you want to play the "what if" game.. you have come to the right place.

    Iknow from actual calls for service that situations at homedo not happen that often where you need a gun in your hands thatquickly. Most calls have ample time to go get a gun and present it. Very rare situations require a gun in fractions of a second.

    In any event... My point was that you need to be responsible. Imagining the worst is going to happen is not a valid excuse to leave a loaded gun unsecured where others can get it that should not.

    Play the "what" if" games if that helps to justify your reason to leave out a loaded gun. I only hope that your responsible child, trained in guns, does not bring over a friend one day while you are away. The friend finds the gunand starts playing with it while your child begs for him to put it down.Then a child gets shot and killed by accident.

    Sorry, I have seen it happen a few times already. I sure hope the gun owner felt good knowinghe was "safe from crime" having that gun out unsecured and ready for action. He could care less about the gun being access by others... including the burglar while he was gone.
    It's just that most folks here do not have a crystal ball and ouija board that you, apparently, do have.

  13. #13
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    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    It's just that most folks here do not have a crystal ball and ouija board that you, apparently, do have.
    No....

    It is called common sense logic and reasonable person thinking.

    Can I be shot and killed while taking out cash at an ATM machine?

    Yes.

    Does it happen so often that I need to draw my gun and make a tactical approach.. keeping my gun at the low ready and keeping myback to the machine while I punch in my pin code so that the bad guy cannot sneak up on me?

    NO!!

    Would I look a little nutty if I did draw and sneak up to the machine knowing that my chances of being attacked were always possible but not probable?

    Yes.

    Now how do you look in your house with guns all over.. "just in case" an intruder picks YOUR house today... out of thethousands of other homes? Out of all the neighbors next to you... somehow he will pick YOUR house to enter.



    But as I said... be prepared... but stay responsible.

    I have been to so many homes for open door alarm calls and they had guns out in the open. A burglar could easily take them and go before I got there.

    To me... I value my guns way too much to let that happen. And I do not want others to find and play with my loaded guns possibly causing harm to them... or me!!

    But do what you like... I am only giving you my opinion and a valid reason behind it.

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    dvdaughtry wrote:
    Do you have link or something to the wall safe? That sounds like it works, espcially if its opperable in the dark.
    I love the one I got. The company I bought mine from stopped making them and I wish I would have known prior so I could have bought a few more. Very thick steel and solid!

    Here is the closest example I can find. I think the copied the company I bought from.

    http://www.safeandvaultstore.com/productdetails/902

    This is the same specs and the only difference is the handle. My door does not have one as it is spring loaded.

    I have a picture on a hinge that hides mine.



    Standard Features

    • One adjustable felt lined shelf included. Additional shelves available.
    • Five button mechanical lock for quick access with 1081 possible combinations.
    • 3/8" thick steel lock block welded to cover guides and adds strength to the lock bolt.
    • Prepunched holes for easy installation.
    • Lock bolts directly through the inner frame of case to prevent prying.
    • Felt lining in back, bottom and sides protects contents.
    • Sturdy fabricated steel construction with pry resistant clamshell design.
    • Available in textured semi-gloss ivory powder coated finish.
    • Continuous hinge is welded on one end to prevent pin removal.
    • Accented with gold tone pinstripe and logo design.

  15. #15
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    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    LEO 229 wrote:
    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    And, the times they do are....?
    If you want to play the "what if" game.. you have come to the right place.

    Iknow from actual calls for service that situations at homedo not happen that often where you need a gun in your hands thatquickly. Most calls have ample time to go get a gun and present it. Very rare situations require a gun in fractions of a second.

    In any event... My point was that you need to be responsible. Imagining the worst is going to happen is not a valid excuse to leave a loaded gun unsecured where others can get it that should not.

    Play the "what" if" games if that helps to justify your reason to leave out a loaded gun. I only hope that your responsible child, trained in guns, does not bring over a friend one day while you are away. The friend finds the gunand starts playing with it while your child begs for him to put it down.Then a child gets shot and killed by accident.

    Sorry, I have seen it happen a few times already. I sure hope the gun owner felt good knowinghe was "safe from crime" having that gun out unsecured and ready for action. He could care less about the gun being access by others... including the burglar while he was gone.
    It's just that most folks here do not have a crystal ball and ouija board that you, apparently, do have.
    Using what passes for this ouija board logic, cops don't need guns when doing routine traffic stops because the vast majority of them occur without incident.



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    les_aker wrote:
    Using what passes for this ouija board logic, cops don't need guns when doing routine traffic stops because the vast majority of them occur without incident.

    Correct!!

    They do not need a baton, mace, or tazer either.

    But the gun and other itemsare part of the duty gear and the gunis holstered and the holster snapped shut.

    The cop knows that the guy in the stopped car "could" shoot and kill him to avoid getting a ticket or hide the fact he has a body in the trunk.

    But the cop also knows that it israre for someone to actually do this sohe does not walk up with his holster unsnapped or his gun out.

    To some, this would meanthe copisbeing overly paranoid with no logical reason to do this except for his "what if" thinking. The cop has no reason to think the person in the car is a threat.

    A cop could "what if" every traffic stop.How do you think you would you feel if the cop walked up with his hand on his gun or his gun out? Would you be upset and say he is being paranoid?

    So now let's talk about having several loaded guns in the house. And you are not even stopping a car or stranger!!!

    Enough said.


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