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Thread: Remington 870 flashlight

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    Regular Member Hendu024's Avatar
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    But I am just wondering if anyone has input on a good mounted flashlight for a shotgun, specifically an 870. I've wanted to get one for a while, and have been looking at various lights, but any input from the forum would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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    I was taught, "When it is dark then keep it dark."

    We have all read the story of Carlos Hathcock shooting through an enemy's riflescope. Is shooting at a light - mounted like a riflescope - different?

    Protect your dark-adapted eyes.

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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    Doug Huffman wrote:
    I was taught, "When it is dark then keep it dark."

    We have all read the story of Carlos Hathcock shooting through an enemy's riflescope. Is shooting at a light - mounted like a riflescope - different?

    Protect your dark-adapted eyes.
    And do not give away your position. That said there is a time and place for a good light.

    What is the posters screen name that does such a fantastic job of reviewing flashlights?

    Yata hey
    You will not rise to the occasion; you will fall back on your level of training. Archilochus, 650 BC

    Old and treacherous will beat young and skilled every time. Yata hey.

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    Regular Member Hendu024's Avatar
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    Grapeshot wrote:
    Doug Huffman wrote:
    I was taught, "When it is dark then keep it dark."

    We have all read the story of Carlos Hathcock shooting through an enemy's riflescope. Is shooting at a light - mounted like a riflescope - different?

    Protect your dark-adapted eyes.
    And do not give away your position. That said there is a time and place for a good light.

    What is the posters screen name that does such a fantastic job of reviewing flashlights?

    Yata hey
    For instance, after the first shot is fired

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    Flashlight?

    That's what the muzzle flash is for!
    James Reynolds

    NRA Certified Firearms Instructor - Pistol, Shotgun, Home Firearms Safety, Refuse To Be A Victim
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    Grapeshot wrote:
    Doug Huffman wroteAnd do not give away your position. That said there is a time and place for a good light.

    What is the posters screen name that does such a fantastic job of reviewing flashlights?

    Yata hey
    watchmaker ?

    http://opencarry.mywowbb.com/forum62/5489.html



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    Regular Member Hendu024's Avatar
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    curtiswr wrote:
    Grapeshot wrote:
    Doug Huffman wroteAnd do not give away your position. That said there is a time and place for a good light.

    What is the posters screen name that does such a fantastic job of reviewing flashlights?

    Yata hey
    watchmaker ?

    http://opencarry.mywowbb.com/forum62/5489.html

    Thanks guys, that's what I was looking for.

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    What about identifying your target before firing your weapon? I am less worried about someone knowing where I am then shooting someone or something I don't know. When it's late at night, the mind ain't thinking straight, and the nerves are through the roof., thats when I want my light. I'm not as worried about a special forces team swarming my house.

    I picked up these lights from cheaper than dirt called "Javaline" that work quite well without completely breaking the bank.

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    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    One of the few disadvantages of a long gun is for clearing rooms at night.

    When you hear something go bump and you know it shouldn't have, you have to find the source. You need to keep both hands on the weapon as you clear each room and that requires either the lights be on...or a light on the shotgun.

    While I'm certain Doug is right. and someone may be waiting to shoot you through your scope in the kitchen

    I still vote for the light. I use this one on a rail mount on the barrel of my 500. I strongly recommend a remote switch velcroed on the pump.

    [size=""][color=""]Surefire L1 LumaMax[/color][/size]


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    peter nap wrote:
    One of the few disadvantages of a long gun is for clearing rooms at night.

    When you hear something go bump and you know it shouldn't have, you have to find the source. You need to keep both hands on the weapon as you clear each room and that requires either the lights be on...or a light on the shotgun.

    While I'm certain Doug is right. and someone may be waiting to shoot you through your scope in the kitchen

    I still vote for the light. I use this one on a rail mount on the barrel of my 500. I strongly recommend a remote switch velcroed on the pump.

    [size=""][color=""]Surefire L1 LumaMax
    +1.

    They make a special adapter for the end of the flashlight that fits on a rifle or shotgun for a switch operated by the weak hand. I know some SPECOPS folks use them on their M4's.
    "If I know that I am headed for a fight, I want something larger with more power, preferably crew-served.
    However, like most of us, as I go through my daily life, I carry something a bit more compact, with a lot less power."
    (unknown 'gun~writer')

    Remington 1911 R1 (Back to Basics)
    SERPA retention or concealed...

    "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not." ~Thomas Jefferson
    (Borrowed from "The Perfect Day" by LTC Dave Grossman)

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    If you want to go the cheap route, ATI makes a shotgun clamp. I think I got mine for 6-7 bucks a long time ago.

    http://www.atigunstocks.com/products...ge=1&id=79

    That, paired with a 1" LED flashlight from walmart worked well enough for me before I got my surefire.

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    Cavymeister wrote:
    What about identifying your target before firing your weapon? I am less worried about someone knowing where I am then shooting someone or something I don't know. When it's late at night, the mind ain't thinking straight, and the nerves are through the roof., thats when I want my light. I'm not as worried about a special forces team swarming my house.
    Exactly. When you encounter someone prowling around at night, you need to identify the target before you shoot. How would you feel if you shot a family member, a delivery guy at the wrong house, or a police officer?

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    ProShooter wrote:
    Flashlight?

    That's what the muzzle flash is for!
    Yeap, always a good idea to fire a few rounds first to light up your target. That way you can determine if it is a prowler, the neighbors cat or his kid looking for the cat before you deliver the kill shot.
    Revelation 1911 - And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.

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    I like that little ATI mount! Seems like a good cheap alternative to most of the other mounting systems out there. I would definitely still pair that mount with a remote switch on the pump.

    Thanks for sharing.

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    peter nap wrote:
    One of the few disadvantages of a long gun is for clearing rooms at night.

    When you hear something go bump and you know it shouldn't have, you have to find the source. You need to keep both hands on the weapon as you clear each room and that requires either the lights be on...or a light on the shotgun.
    I'm no tactician, but surely you can't really use a flashlight to clear an otherwise totally dark room? I see this all the time on TV cop shows, and I cringe every time... if there is a bad guy hiding in the room, I couldn't imagine a more disadvantageous position than to be walking around with a flashlight, while they are hiding in a dark corner just waiting for the perfect shot to take you out.

    What am I missing here?

    TFred


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    TFred wrote:
    peter nap wrote:
    One of the few disadvantages of a long gun is for clearing rooms at night.

    When you hear something go bump and you know it shouldn't have, you have to find the source. You need to keep both hands on the weapon as you clear each room and that requires either the lights be on...or a light on the shotgun.
    I'm no tactician, but surely you can't really use a flashlight to clear an otherwise totally dark room? I see this all the time on TV cop shows, and I cringe every time... if there is a bad guy hiding in the room, I couldn't imagine a more disadvantageous position than to be walking around with a flashlight, while they are hiding in a dark corner just waiting for the perfect shot to take you out.

    What am I missing here?

    TFred
    Know your target and what is beyond.


    The big things is to identify your target before you fire. Are your eyes that good at night that you can be sure of what you are shooting at in the dark? I'd rather be an easy target then accidentally shoot my kid that got up in the middle of the night for some water, or is trying to sneak in at night after being out past curfew.

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    Cavymeister wrote:
    TFred wrote:
    peter nap wrote:
    One of the few disadvantages of a long gun is for clearing rooms at night.

    When you hear something go bump and you know it shouldn't have, you have to find the source. You need to keep both hands on the weapon as you clear each room and that requires either the lights be on...or a light on the shotgun.
    I'm no tactician, but surely you can't really use a flashlight to clear an otherwise totally dark room? I see this all the time on TV cop shows, and I cringe every time... if there is a bad guy hiding in the room, I couldn't imagine a more disadvantageous position than to be walking around with a flashlight, while they are hiding in a dark corner just waiting for the perfect shot to take you out.

    What am I missing here?

    TFred
    Know your target and what is beyond.

    The big things is to identify your target before you fire. Are your eyes that good at night that you can be sure of what you are shooting at in the dark? I'd rather be an easy target then accidentally shoot my kid that got up in the middle of the night for some water, or is trying to sneak in at night after being out past curfew.
    I think we're talking apples and oranges here. I was responding to "clearing a room". Walking into a dark room that may or may not have someone hiding in the corner, while using a flashlight to observe only 2 square feet at a time does not seem to bode well for my survival.

    I didn't say anything about shooting in the dark.

    If they can see me but I can't see them, they win. At a minimum, it seems smarter to turn on the lights so you can both see each other. At least you're even then. Or perhaps even better, wait in the dark for them to move and be heard, so you at least know where to point the flashlight when you do turn it on to see who is there.

    There are LEOs here, what do they train you to do in these situations?

    TFred



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    Regular Member Hendu024's Avatar
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    TFred wrote:
    Cavymeister wrote:
    TFred wrote:
    peter nap wrote:
    One of the few disadvantages of a long gun is for clearing rooms at night.

    When you hear something go bump and you know it shouldn't have, you have to find the source. You need to keep both hands on the weapon as you clear each room and that requires either the lights be on...or a light on the shotgun.
    I'm no tactician, but surely you can't really use a flashlight to clear an otherwise totally dark room? I see this all the time on TV cop shows, and I cringe every time... if there is a bad guy hiding in the room, I couldn't imagine a more disadvantageous position than to be walking around with a flashlight, while they are hiding in a dark corner just waiting for the perfect shot to take you out.

    What am I missing here?

    TFred
    Know your target and what is beyond.

    The big things is to identify your target before you fire. Are your eyes that good at night that you can be sure of what you are shooting at in the dark? I'd rather be an easy target then accidentally shoot my kid that got up in the middle of the night for some water, or is trying to sneak in at night after being out past curfew.
    I think we're talking apples and oranges here. I was responding to "clearing a room". Walking into a dark room that may or may not have someone hiding in the corner, while using a flashlight to observe only 2 square feet at a time does not seem to bode well for my survival.

    I didn't say anything about shooting in the dark.

    If they can see me but I can't see them, they win. At a minimum, it seems smarter to turn on the lights so you can both see each other. At least you're even then. Or perhaps even better, wait in the dark for them to move and be heard, so you at least know where to point the flashlight when you do turn it on to see who is there.

    There are LEOs here, what do they train you to do in these situations?

    TFred

    +1

    If I hear something going bump in the night inside my house, I'm not necessarily going to go looking for it. The way my stairs are, they spiral down and you can see through the slats. Tactically disadvantageous, because the BG could see me before I could see him. I would just wait at the top of the stairs from behind the corner. Elevated position, from cover. I'll just hit 911 on my cell and leave the line open in my room. If the BG wants to look around my house, I have no qualms with waiting for him to come into my comfort zone, rather than seek him out in a dark house.

    When the stairs creak, I'd hit him with the light. I've been looking for a light for my 870 for a while, thank you for all the responses.

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    Accomplished Advocate peter nap's Avatar
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    TFred wrote:
    Cavymeister wrote:
    TFred wrote:
    peter nap wrote:
    There are LEOs here, what do they train you to do in these situations?

    TFred

    Stand around, look snotty, get in the way

    Oh...I forgot, talk on the radio:shock:

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    peter nap wrote:
    TFred wrote:
    Cavymeister wrote:
    TFred wrote:
    peter nap wrote:
    There are LEOs here, what do they train you to do in these situations?

    TFred

    Stand around, look snotty, get in the way

    Oh...I forgot, talk on the radio:shock:
    I haven't laughed in a while haha, thank you peter. "real laugh" not being sarcastic either. "talk on radio" that is priceless

    I keep my E2D LED defender next to my Glock 21 at all times. Primarily for abrupt flashes of light to ascertain the room, and any abnormalities. I wouldn't use it in constant stream, as this is not useful when i know the extent of my domicile.

    I feel quick flashes while standing behind door frames down a hall for example is a fair tactic for those whom prefer light. I keep the gun in tight with elbows bent to prevent a sneak grab from corners etc.

    Honestly i see no perfect way, and I agree with the apples and oranges statement.


    Also as a side not, throughout the large portions of my home that are located at immediate entrances I have motion lights, so if it gets quiet and im in my secure area i will know where the most recent movement is, or exactly when it occurs.

    Glocky



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    Regular Member MSC 45ACP's Avatar
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    TFred wrote:
    Cavymeister wrote:
    TFred wrote:
    peter nap wrote:
    One of the few disadvantages of a long gun is for clearing rooms at night.

    When you hear something go bump and you know it shouldn't have, you have to find the source. You need to keep both hands on the weapon as you clear each room and that requires either the lights be on...or a light on the shotgun.
    I'm no tactician, but surely you can't really use a flashlight to clear an otherwise totally dark room? I see this all the time on TV cop shows, and I cringe every time... if there is a bad guy hiding in the room, I couldn't imagine a more disadvantageous position than to be walking around with a flashlight, while they are hiding in a dark corner just waiting for the perfect shot to take you out.

    What am I missing here?

    TFred
    Know your target and what is beyond.

    The big things is to identify your target before you fire. Are your eyes that good at night that you can be sure of what you are shooting at in the dark? I'd rather be an easy target then accidentally shoot my kid that got up in the middle of the night for some water, or is trying to sneak in at night after being out past curfew.
    I think we're talking apples and oranges here. I was responding to "clearing a room". Walking into a dark room that may or may not have someone hiding in the corner, while using a flashlight to observe only 2 square feet at a time does not seem to bode well for my survival.

    I didn't say anything about shooting in the dark.

    If they can see me but I can't see them, they win. At a minimum, it seems smarter to turn on the lights so you can both see each other. At least you're even then. Or perhaps even better, wait in the dark for them to move and be heard, so you at least know where to point the flashlight when you do turn it on to see who is there.

    There are LEOs here, what do they train you to do in these situations?

    TFred

    We were trained to use the flashlight with the pistol. When clearing a room, the light was used in the weak hand (reaction hand for you gung-ho LE types). When going around a corner, you hold your light up high (or down low, or anywhere your body IS NOT) because the BG is most likey to shoot at the light. Your head won't be where the light is, but you will have enough of your head (and your pistol) around the corner to do what needs to be done. We practiced this A LOT.

    When shooting in the dark at longer range, your light is held in the weak hand with the light source at the bottom of the hand; pointing down range. It also supports your shooting hand at the wrist so your wrists are crossed in an "X".

    When I worked for Naval Special Warfare (SeALS) as a civilian, I remember them having lights (and other cool gadgets) attached to their M4's. They did a LOT of CQB training in the shooting house. They never had their Surefires off the weapon except for maintenance and repair.

    I never had any training using a detached light with a long gun, but I wouldn't try shooting a 12 ga riot gun loaded with 3" slugs with one hand. That might be a wild ride.

    Just my $.02 worth...
    "If I know that I am headed for a fight, I want something larger with more power, preferably crew-served.
    However, like most of us, as I go through my daily life, I carry something a bit more compact, with a lot less power."
    (unknown 'gun~writer')

    Remington 1911 R1 (Back to Basics)
    SERPA retention or concealed...

    "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not." ~Thomas Jefferson
    (Borrowed from "The Perfect Day" by LTC Dave Grossman)

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    MSC 45ACP wrote:
    I never had any training using a detached light with a long gun, but I wouldn't try shooting a 12 ga riot gun loaded with 3" slugs with one hand. That might be a wild ride.
    It's not too bad, but I wouldn't recommend it.

    As for lighting, personally, I'd go with the 1,000,000 candle power spotlights mounted on a wall facing away from you, toward them, but that's not always practical.
    Why open carry? Because 1911 > 911.

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    ALWAYS identify your target. True story...

    One night my father awakes to the sound of glass breaking. He grabshis .357 revolver and heads down the hallway. When he rounds the corner towards the sound of the glass he sees a flashlight beam in the kitchen and dining room area. Now he is convinced that someone has broken into the house.

    He is ready to defend house and home. As Dad always said "If you break into my house while I'm away, you're there to steal something. You break in while I'm home you're there to hurt someone".

    He comes around the corner lowering the weapon in the direction of the flashlight and flippingthe light on. He pulls the weapon back at the last second as he realizes that the "intruder" is my older brother. While trying to get a drink in the middle of the night he had dropped a glass and it shattered. To try and keep from waking Mom and Dad he was using a flashlight to cleanup instead of turning on the lights.

    Dad still tells this story to this day and it usually ends with "He doesn't know how close he was to getting shot".

    -Bund

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