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Thread: every had any LEO Trouble?

  1. #1
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    Have you had any LEO trouble for OC? Arrested etc?

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    i haven't ever had trouble. What few times LEO has noticed my gun it was a conversation starter more than anything.

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    Never. Thought I was a couple times, once with a JCSO deputy just a few days agoand once with a Mobile PD officer a few months ago, but nope, never.

  4. #4
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    hopefully with the recent increase in OC popularity in other states the LEO's here have either caught on or don't care

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    YEARS ago. I prevailed.

  6. #6
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    I've been reading this forum off and on for a year or so, but just registered tonight and this is my first post. There are several active threads with the us v them, OC'rs v the cops theme, but I decided to post in this one rather than jump into the debate in another already lengthy exchange.

    I notice that the non-LE posters here seem to fall into two loose groups: the guys who just want to carry with the least amount of hassles, and the ones who want to take on the system, exercise their perceived rights to the fullest extent, and make things as they should be; sort of an activist mentality. Nothing wrong with that. However, if you choose that route, be prepared for the possibility of hostile, possibly physical confrontations with law enforcement, as well as lengthy legal complications.

    I've seen posters express the sentiment that police officers who don't react to OC as some think they should need to "find another line of work", etc. What I've not seen is an good explanation of the gritty realities of law enforcement in the Great State of Mississippi. So here's my shot at that:

    Although things have improved in the past few years, police work in this state often pays poorly. As a result, some small-town departments and rural counties have serious recruiting problems and will settle for most any non-felon who can fog a mirror. Part-time officers, who are required to have only half the training hours of a full-time officer, make up nearly half the staff of some of these agencies. Further, MS allows many officers to work for up to a year without certification... often without any real training whatsoever. Yes, standards need to be tightened and the bar should be raised, but that requires money so obviously things won't be changing a lot in the near future.

    Having said all that, I'll say that most officers I know are doing the job to the best of their ability and with the best of intentions. Nevertheless, if you are expecting to encounter a well-educated, highly-trained police professional on that traffic stop or public OC contact, you may be seriously disappointed. And unless you've been morbidly curious about the whole Taser experience or are looking for a test case at any cost, you'd do best to avoid being verbally resistive, surrender your weapon when he asks for it, and generally do just what the nice officer says

  7. #7
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    bacfire wrote:
    Although things have improved in the past few years, police work in this state often pays poorly. As a result, some small-town departments and rural counties have serious recruiting problems and will settle for most any non-felon who can fog a mirror. Part-time officers, who are required to have only half the training hours of a full-time officer, make up nearly half the staff of some of these agencies. Further, MS allows many officers to work for up to a year without certification... often without any real training whatsoever. Yes, standards need to be tightened and the bar should be raised, but that requires money so obviously things won't be changing a lot in the near future.

    Having said all that, I'll say that most officers I know are doing the job to the best of their ability and with the best of intentions. Nevertheless, if you are expecting to encounter a well-educated, highly-trained police professional on that traffic stop or public OC contact, you may be seriously disappointed. And unless you've been morbidly curious about the whole Taser experience or are looking for a test case at any cost, you'd do best to avoid being verbally resistive, surrender your weapon when he asks for it, and generally do just what the nice officer says
    Pay issues are not really a vald an excuse for poor performance. It stinks thatthey are not compensated in accordance with the risks theyface daily butmost LEOs know full well they won't get premium salaries when they choose to become LEOs.

    Having never been stopped for open carry, my interactions with LEOs have been limited to checkpoints, traffic incidents, casual meetings, etc. Common courtesy and politeness go a long way in maintaining a cordial relationship with any LEO. My job limits the amount of open carrying I do but wheneverI meet an LEO under any circumstancesI treat him or herlike everyone else with the same greetings, small talk and politeness I extend to anyoneI meet in my daily routine. I expect the same coutesy to be reciprocated and thankfullyto this point I have not been disappointed.

    Respect for authority doesn't require a surrender of rights however. I will "do what the nice officer says" so long as he does not abuse his authority. If I am to respect his authority and submit to it, so should he and not exceed it. If I am am to know the law, so should he.

    Surrending of a weapon is something that we all expect when dealing with LEOs in an official capacity whether we agree or not. I don't think I've seen anyone advocate forceful resistance. What has been advocated is that when LEOs abuse their authority and violate the law, they be held accountable legally just as we are.

  8. #8
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    JT
    Pay issues are not really a vald an excuse for poor performance. It stinks thatthey are not compensated in accordance with the risks theyface daily butmost LEOs know full well they won't get premium salaries when they choose to become LEOs.
    In a slightly more perfect world, theremight be plenty of top-notch people willing to step up and do the job for whatever is offered, pay for their own continuing education and training, etc. This is not reality in MS. I'm not trying to attack police officers. Many fit the description above (I like to think I do). Unfortunately, it's tough to fill the rosters with quality officers in the typical county or small town which pays part-timers $8/hr (or relies on unpaid reserves), offers no in-service training, and either waits as long as they can legally get away with before sending their people for basic training or allows officers to shuffle from one agency to another and back to avoid certification deadlines.

    My point was that the armed citizen stands a good chance of encountering an untrained or undertrained officer who may react unpredictably to the introduction of a second gun to the situation. He/she may be a fine person with the best of intentions, but may be scared, startled, or unsure of the law or the appropriate tactical response. Neither the citizen nor the officer can know all the variables that influence perceptions and reactions. Some have suggested in other threads that they would not surrender their weapon, stand up for their rights, etc. I'm suggesting that *any* form of resistance, no matter how just and well-reasoned you think it is, could provoke a less-than-measured response. Much better to swallow your pride for the moment and, if you feel you must, take it up with the officer's chain of command or perhaps your local representative, alderman, or whatever.

  9. #9
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    I guess I am "odd man out" on this one.

    Last year, I was on my way to a Tactical Medic course and stopped in Kosciusco for a couple bottles of water and a sausage biscuit.

    I left my pistol between the seat and console of my locked truck at the convenience store, but the holster was on my belt.

    I returned the gun to the holster after I got back in the truck.

    As I was approaching the City limits headed North out of town, I noticed TWO cop cars behind me.
    I know the "look" of being followed, and I figured we "needed to talk about something".
    I already had my turn signal on and was pulling over at the Chevy dealership when they hit their lights.

    They were nice enough AFTER they saw the FD badge and clothing I was wearing, but it still bugged me a bit that they were so quick to come looking for me even though no "infraction" had been comitted.

    Also because I would have been in full compliance with the law as I was:
    1) "travelling" and outside my realm of familiarity
    2) on my way "to or from a legitimate firearms related activity".

    Like I said, they were nice to me and didn't seem in any way aggressive, but the whole thing was kinda silly and unneccessaryto me.

    It was all because "someone called in and said".
    What part of "SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED" is so hard to understand ???


    James: Ain't this a little showy, Pa? I mean with the guns out an' all?

    Big Jake: James, don't be fooled. They all know what's in this box, and they all want it. what we're doin' with this audacious DISplay is tellin' 'em they can't have it. Who knows, we may be savin' some poor miscreant soul's life this way.

    www.dixieleather.com - www.dixiepreparedness.org

  10. #10
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    They might have also followed you to see if you were going to get on the Natchez Trace Parkway, which would have been an issue..

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