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Thread: Is OC only for citizens?

  1. #1
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    A little bit of history for this question is required. The long and the short is that my parents are full US citizens. Born and raised stateside. My father served in the US Navy for 20+ years, and I was adopted from overseas. I am here stateside, completely legal, and am in the process of getting my US citizenship.
    That being said, I understand that the constitution offers certain rights, but mostly to US citizens. I do not have the right to vote, but I it seems that I do have some 2a rights. I live in Idaho, and I was able to get my CC permit. Which means I've passed all the background checks and jumped through all the hoops.
    My question is: if I were stopped by an LE, do I have a constitutional right to OC? It's completely legal in my state, but since I am not a US citizen do I have any legal grounds to OC, or is that only extended to US citizens?


  2. #2
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    I believe that if Idaho has issued you a CC permit, OC extends to you as well. I'm pretty sure that the Bill of Rights, State and Fed lawsapply to all who reside in this country legally, with the exception of voting.

  3. #3
    Regular Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard. We all hope you learn what it really means to be an American and I suspect in Idaho, that will occur just as natural as breathing.

    I would offer this little tidbit. The Constitution offers no rights at all to Americans and neither does the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights merely recognizes rights which already exist and warns government that these, and any others held by the People, are not to be infringed.

    While this may sound like arguing semantics, I can assure you it is nothing of the sort. If we accept and believe that the Constitution establishes certain rights, then we can also believe that said rights are the property of the government and can just as easily be taken away. That was not the intent of the Founders. Their belief was that those rights addressed in the Bill of Rights were so fundamental to a free people that they were never to be subject to alteration or removal. This is why the Bill of Rights is unamendable, according to several of the Founders.

    Anyway, enjoy your freedom and let us know how it goes for you. BTW, where are you from?

    In the final seconds of your life, just before your killer is about to dispatch you to that great eternal darkness, what would you rather have in your hand? A cell phone or a gun?

    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

    America First!

  4. #4
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    widescreen wrote:
    * A little bit of history for this question is required.* The long and the short is that my parents are full US citizens.* Born and raised stateside.* My father served in the US Navy for 20+ years, and I was adopted from overseas.* I am here stateside, completely legal, and am in the process of getting my US citizenship.*
    * That being said, I understand that the constitution offers certain rights, but mostly to US citizens.* I do not have the right to vote, but I it seems that I do have some 2a rights.* I live in Idaho, and I was able to get my CC permit.* Which means I've passed all the background checks and jumped through all the hoops.
    * My question is:* if I were stopped by an LE, do I have a constitutional right to OC?* It's completely legal in my state, but since I am not a US citizen do I have any legal grounds to OC, or is that only extended to US citizens?
    Under the 14th amendment, any resident alien has equal protection under the law, same as a citizen. This means that if you have a Green Card, you're all set.

  5. #5
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    SouthernBoy wrote:
    Anyway, enjoy your freedom and let us know how it goes for you. BTW, where are you from?
    My adoptive parents were stationed in Yokosuka, Japan. But I've lived state side for the past 25+ years.

    Thanks for all the advise guys.

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