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Thread: Liquor Barn

  1. #1
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    I went to shop at Liquor Barn today (unarmed) and noticed the attached sign on the door to LB. It was banning CC and quoted KRS 244.125 in its ban.

    "244.125 Prohibition against possession of loaded firearm in room where alcoholic beverages are being sold by the drink.
    (1) Except as provided in subsection (3) of this section, no person shall be in possession of a loaded, as defined in KRS 237.060, firearm while actually within the room where alcoholic beverages are being sold by the drink of a building on premises licensed to sell distilled spirits and wine at retail by the drink for consumption on the licensed premises pursuant to KRS Chapter 243."

    I emailed the Beaumont store about this and let them know that according to the particular KRS, it only bans firearms in buildings where alcohol is sold by the drink for immediate consumption.

    Whatever they do, I'll just OC next time!

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    Pursuant to the stop sign on the corner - concealed weapons may not be carried on this premises...

    that would have about as much sense to it...

    Next time I am out to the Liquor Barn at Fern Valley in Louisville I will look for this sign.. no telling when I will be out there though....

    I have always wondered.... if properly concealed how will they ever know?
    I got a gun for my wife.. good trade!

  3. #3
    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    kywildcat581 wrote:
    I have always wondered.... if properly concealed how will they ever know?

    They can't.

    They think that simply putting a specific notice out to law abiding adults entering their businesses thatsaid law abiding adults will recognize their lawful restrictions inherent in their property rights and will comply.

    They're quite naive.





    P.S. Actually, there is one way they will know. Some goof likeDonald Goodrich might figure out how to let the cat out of the bag....

    Man Allegedly Shows Gun After iPhone Trouble

    http://opencarry.mywowbb.com/forum43/32268.html


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    Same deal with the movie theater on Preston Hwy and 265. They have very small signs on the doors quoting a KRS dealing with permit revocation if you fail to turn it in to the police when they ask for it. Makes no sense. They're grasping at straws as all they can do is ask you to leave.

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    i would like a little understanding about CC in a place like TGIF or texas road house

    if im reading right im not to carry in those place's but i have a few times

    or are they stateing i cant be at the bar?

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    Liquor Barn's license is for consumption, though they don't have tables. ABC, Lexington-Fayette Urban County Governmentand insurance companies demand that the signbe posted. It is not a Liquor Barn decision.

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    Even if their license is for consumption, you should still be able to legally carry there. The law says that you cannot carry a weapon in the part of the business that is specifically designated for the consumption of alcohol.

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    langzaiguy wrote:
    Even if their license is for consumption, you should still be able to legally carry there. The law says that you cannot carry a weapon in the part of the business that is specifically designated for the consumption of alcohol.
    If I'm not mistaken It says you can't carry a LOADED firearms in those places.

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    mellio wrote:
    langzaiguy wrote:
    Even if their license is for consumption, you should still be able to legally carry there. The law says that you cannot carry a weapon in the part of the business that is specifically designated for the consumption of alcohol.
    If I'm not mistaken It says you can't carry a LOADED firearms in those places.
    244.125 Prohibition against possession of loaded firearm in room where alcoholic
    beverages are being sold by the drink.

    Additionally, that section doesn't mention any criminal penalty attached to violation, only that the firearm is subject to forefiture.

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    Also, I have never known any Liquor Barn to SELL alcohol by the drink for immediate consumption. I have known them to occasionally serve free samples.

    So, by the letter of the law, it would seem as though since they offer free samples for immediate consumption, and alcoholic drinks for later consumption, it would be impossible to break this particular KRS at LB.

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    (oops, double post)

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    During some Liquor Barn wine tastings I've noticed that they regularly offer a special higher priced wine which they charge for. They also charge for all beer samples. Maybe it is based on that.

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    Regular Member Thos.Jefferson's Avatar
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    Strangely,the way I read the Constitution the legislature only has the power to regulate CONCEALED carry of weapons thereby rendering any law TRYING to regulate the carry of weapons openly, wholely un-Constitutional and not laws at all.
    He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent which will reach to himself. -- Thomas Paine (1737--1809), Dissertation on First Principles of Government, 1795

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    Agreed. I've always wondered about how KY regulates "bar carry". I don't feel like being arrested as a test case. Anyone interested in fighting this? Not necessarily in the courtroom but through congressional contact?

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    Regular Member Thos.Jefferson's Avatar
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    Every time I have tried to contact any of my state reps. I have never received a reply.
    He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent which will reach to himself. -- Thomas Paine (1737--1809), Dissertation on First Principles of Government, 1795

  16. #16
    Regular Member Thos.Jefferson's Avatar
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    gutshot wrote:
    langzaiguy wrote:
    Agreed. I've always wondered about how KY regulates "bar carry". I don't feel like being arrested as a test case. Anyone interested in fighting this? Not necessarily in the courtroom but through congressional contact?

    My guess is that the state regulates bar carry using their general police power. No constitutional right is absolute. If the need to regulate is great enough, the benefit to the general population is great enough and the regulation is unintrusive enough it can be regulated. This is the basis of the often stated "you can't yell fire in a crowded theater" exception to free speech.
    General powers subordinate to Bill of Rights -- Laws contrary thereto are void.


    To guard against transgression of the high powers which we have delegated, We Declare that every thing in this Bill of Rights is excepted out of the general powers of government, and shall forever remain inviolate; and all laws contrary thereto, or contrary to this Constitution, shall be void.

    Text as Ratified on: August 3, 1891, and revised September 28, 1891.
    History: Not yet amended.
    Sounds pretty absolute to me. Your view that Rights are not absolute is a product of your State indoctrination via the public school systems.
    He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent which will reach to himself. -- Thomas Paine (1737--1809), Dissertation on First Principles of Government, 1795

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    As a history teacher who apparently "indoctrinates" kids, I want to establish the fact that our founding fathers understood that our rights aren't absolute.

    They recognized libel, slander, and treason as limits to free speech. You may have a right to peaceful assembly, but that doesn't mean you can assemble on private property.

    I think most people would agree that just because you have freedom of religion doesn't mean you can adopt a religion whose main form of worship is animal sacrifice/torture.

    Again, I believe most people would agree that just because citizens have the right to bear arms doesn't necessarily mean young kids should be strapping handguns on themselves.

    I think these are a few examples of where our constitutional rights end.

    Still, TJ, I agree with you that the firearm ban in bars is unconstitutional. I think this is in blatant contradiction to the KY Const.

  18. #18
    Regular Member Thos.Jefferson's Avatar
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    "My guess is that the state regulates bar carry using their general police power. No constitutional right is absolute. If the need to regulate is great enough, the benefit to the general population is great enough and the regulation is unintrusive enough it can be regulated. This is the basis of the often stated "you can't yell fire in a crowded theater" exception to free speech."

    I was merely going on what you had posted. Obviously I don't know you personaly but I am able to read and quite frankly, what you wrote speaks volumes.
    He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent which will reach to himself. -- Thomas Paine (1737--1809), Dissertation on First Principles of Government, 1795

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