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Thread: 3 AM wakeup

  1. #1
    Regular Member frommycolddeadhands's Avatar
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    This isn't exactly a self defense story. Nothing violent happened, it was just a strange situation that put me on high alert for a while.

    It's 330 in the AM, I'm upstairs in my bedroom trying to get to sleep. It's dark and raining outside and I keep hoping the pitter-patter of rain on the window will lull me to sleep sometime soon. My wife is down in the living room pounding away on the keyboard trying to get a college paper done. As I'm finally starting to drift off to sleep, I hear the front doorbell ring. (The back door has a different ring, so we always know if it's the front or back). It takes me a second to blink the cobwebs out of my head. My first thought is that my wife somehow locked herself out of the house, I couldn't think of anyone who would come for a visit at that godawful hour with the rain coming down like it was.

    Downstairs I hear my wife call out "Who is it?"

    I'm on my feet. My revolver comes out of the nightstand drawer. (Better safe than sorry) and I'm at the stairs in a hearbeat. My wife is at the foot of the stairs by our front door. Our house has an interior porch, so there is a door to get into the porch, and another door to get into the house proper. My wife had opened the inner door and positioned herself so that she could shut it quickly if she needed to. The outer door was still closed and locked, keeping whoever was outside......outside.

    Our visitor calls through the door and says that his name is "Corey". We don't know anyone by that name. My wife asks what he wants.

    The unfamiliar voice calls back through the door and asks if we "Have a girl in there." My wife raises an eyebrow and calls back "What girl?"

    Answer: "I'm looking for a girl."

    Wife: "What's her name?"

    Answer: "Lisa."

    Wife: "Sorry, you've got the wrong house."

    Answer: "Ahh, well I'm trying to find this girl. She left her purse at the bar and I'm trying to get it back to her. You don't know any girl named Lisa around here?"

    Wife (after thinking for a second): "You said you have her purse?"

    Answer: "Yeah"

    Wife: "And there's nothing inside the purse with this girl's address on it?"

    (Pause) Answer: No, I mean, I dont actually have her purse. Just her social security card and a couple things like that. I'm just trying to get it back to her.

    Wife: What is her last name?

    Visitor: I dunno.

    Wife: Her social security card doesn't have it?

    Visitor: Uh...it's at my house.

    Wife: And you don't know where she lives?

    Answer: Somewhere around here.

    Wife: Well how do you know that?

    (Pause) Answer: The, uh, maroon car parked out here in front of your house looks like the car that she drives. Do you know who's car that is?

    The outer door is still closed, so we can't see what car he's talking about, but it's not ours and we have no idea who's it is. My wife shrugs and asks me if the neighbor that lives behind us has a kid named Lisa. I shake my head no. At this point I should mention that the neighbor who lives behind us is a social butterfly who enjoys going to bars and bringing home college age boys. We figured this one just got lost.

    Visitor: Uh, I'm really getting soaked out here.

    At this point Amy shouted instructions for him to go around back and try our neighbors house. Lisa might be there. The guy shouts a muffled 'thanks' and goes around the side of our house. Something was off about this guy, his story didn't make a heck of a lot of sense, as far as I knew our neighbor didn't know anyone named Lisa or have anyone staying with her. I moved to one of the back windows just to keep an eye on what he decided to do.

    He knocked onour neighbor'sfront door. Waited around, no answer. He goes around the side of her house and puts his hands up on the glass to peek in the window, then goes around front again and knocks on the door. It doesn't open. He turns around and walks back around the side of our house and stands on the sidewalk looking both ways. It was the first time I actually got a look at this guy. He looked like the average college slacker. (the university is only a few blocks from our house and he looked the right age) Hewas a white kid witha knit cap on his head, a few scraggly hairs on his chin posing as a goatee, a black jacket, and pants four sizes two big.

    I pulled on some jeans, a t-shirt, my bedroom slippers, and a coat. I handed off my revolver to my wife, deciding this kid wasn't a threat that needed to be met with a firearm. I stepped outside into the rain to try and get this thing figured out. I seriously doubted his 'Lisa' story and I didn't want him hanging around in the pouring rain in front of my house all night. I never even got the chance to talk to him. Our other neighbor (beside us, not behind us) came out with a baseball bat in his hand. This kid had apparently gone around the backside of his house and tried to get in his basement door by punching random numbers into the keypad lock. Unfortunately the basement of their house is their oldest son's room. He heard the keypad numbers beeping and woke up his dad, who grabbed the bat and came outside. The two of them mixed words for a few seconds. My neighbor wasn't yelling or anything, he simply wanted to know what the kid was doing fiddling with his keypad. The kid denied everything and said he just knocked on the door looking for Lisa.

    Two seconds later a cop cruiser pulls up. The neighbor had called prior to stepping outside. Good response time for the cops. They take the kid aside, search him and don't find anything aside from a few miniature bottles of booze in his pockets. We tell our story, the neighbor tells his story, and the kid continues to babble about some girl named Lisa who lost her purse- that he doesn't have- and her social security card that he's trying to return at 3am in the pouring rain- oh, but that's at his house, but not really his house, it's his buddy's house that's on the other side of town blah blah blah.

    In the end the kid's story doesn't make any sense. The cops took him to lockup for the night. An officer approached us after everything was said and done. There'd been some local break-in's that they think the kid might have something to do with. Ringing the doorbell was just a way of seeing if anyone was home, and the BS story about looking for a girl was just in case someone actually answered. I raised an eyebrow at that theory because my wife was awake in the living room with the TV and the living room lights on. Why would he think our house was vacant?

    Our landlord had put a 'FOR RENT' sign on the front lawn, (we're moving soon)and the lights weren't visible through the curtains. Great.

    In any event, I was proud of my wife for not opening the door to the late night visitor, and glad that I had my firearm just-in-case things had turned out differently. It also made me realize how something as stupid as a "FOR RENT" sign on your lawn can paint your house as a target for idiots and break in artists.
    God is the one driving this stagecoach, I'm just riding shotgun.

  2. #2
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    Wow, I'm glad you and your family are ok. I commend you on what you did, though I don't think going outside, unarmed at that, was the best idea. But, I wasn't there either and I can appreciate people that look out for their neighbors. Not too many people would do that these days.



    -Gruu

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    Who rings a door bell at that hour? Well I know for a fact the FBI will
    do it for background checks. We got a whole bunch of calls all through the
    night complaining about being woken and questioned at that hour.
    Didn't get a lot of rave reviews to the feds by them either.:P
    The less irate waited till morning to complain.
    My guess is they wanted to catch them sound asleep so the 'stories'
    wouldn't have any forethought. Or they wanted a lot of foul comments
    for the files.
    Do you think that now that it is a crime to lie to a fed that our 'Files'
    will be a lot smaller?


    I have to go with a -1 for turning him off on your neighbor though.
    Unless you used that to get him into view from a better vantage point
    for yourself. To much time spent once you determined he was at the very
    least a loon though.

  4. #4
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    Let the Monday morning quarterbacking begin.

    I wasn't there, so take it FWIW.

    Reading the account, I also was a little surprised that you sent him to the neighbor's as well.

    Other than that, I would agree, he was up to something. After the guy left, I think I would have called the police, if not halfway through his stupid story.

    My best friend had something like that happen a couple of winters ago.

    A guy was rattling his doorknob at 5:30am. He got up and asked who was there, and the guy replied, "Chad." My buddy says, "What do you want?" Answer: "I'm cold." He decided to open the door, and, in sub-zero weather, there's this stoned guy wearing flip-flops, ripped up jeans, and a t-shirt. It turned out he got lost while walking home, and was hypothermic. My buddy ended up giving the guy a ride home, although, again, I think I would have called the local PD to taxi him home.

  5. #5
    Regular Member frommycolddeadhands's Avatar
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    SlackwareRobert wrote:

    I have to go with a -1 for turning him off on your neighbor though.
    Unless you used that to get him into view from a better vantage point
    for yourself. To much time spent once you determined he was at the very
    least a loon though.
    Yeah, I know that sounds pretty bad reading over it again. It wasn't a tactical decision or anything like that. It didn't serve any strategic purpose. The lady who lives behind us has a history for inviting over college kids who get mixed up and knock on our door instead of going around back to her house. After half a dozen mix up's like that it sort of becomes the default answer to send them around back and let her sort it out. I wasn't exactly a mental giant at 3am. The kid's story was suspicious to say the least, but he wasn't banging on the door. He never asked to come inside, he wasn't acting hostile in the least. There were enough red flags that I wanted to keep an eye on the kid while he was trouncing around my backyard and knocking on my neighbor's door, but there weren't any signs of violent behavior or intent.
    God is the one driving this stagecoach, I'm just riding shotgun.

  6. #6
    Regular Member frommycolddeadhands's Avatar
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    TehGruu wrote:
    I don't think going outside, unarmed at that, was the best idea. But, I wasn't there either and I can appreciate people that look out for their neighbors. Not too many people would do that these days.

    -Gruu
    I made a judgement call when I handed the pistol off to my wife. The main reason I brought it downstairs with me was because I didn't know who was on the other side of the door or what their intentions were. After the rather mellow paced conversation we had through the door, and getting a good look at him, I really didn't think it was anything else than a kid who had a few too many to drink and needed to be pointed in the right direction so he could go home and sleep it off. I didn't recon I needed a pistol to do that. I didn't just lay it on a table or put it away. I gave it to my wife, who was just inside the door in case things suddenly turned. I wasn't exactly rushing out to the kid. I stood in front of my house, he was on the other side of the yard near the road. I'm not a wrestler or a boxer, but if he decided to rush across the yard and attack me I'm fairly sure he would get tangled up in his own pants before he made the distance. Again, there was nothing violent or dangerous in his behavior up to this point, and talking to him doesn't necessarily involve approaching him.

    As far as neighbors go, we're pretty friendly with the lady who lives behind us, and we do watch out for each other. (She recently got herself a handgun after a bad run in with her ex-hubby). Funnily enough, after living in this house for a little over a year, it's the first time I met my other neighbor (baseball bat).
    God is the one driving this stagecoach, I'm just riding shotgun.

  7. #7
    State Researcher HankT's Avatar
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    frommycolddeadhands wrote:
    I made a judgement call when I handed the pistol off to my wife. The main reason I brought it downstairs with me was because I didn't know who was on the other side of the door or what their intentions were. After the rather mellow paced conversation we had through the door, and getting a good look at him, I really didn't think it was anything else than a kid who had a few too many to drink and needed to be pointed in the right direction so he could go home and sleep it off. I didn't recon I needed a pistol to do that. I didn't just lay it on a table or put it away. I gave it to my wife, who was just inside the door in case things suddenly turned. I wasn't exactly rushing out to the kid. I stood in front of my house, he was on the other side of the yard near the road. I'm not a wrestler or a boxer, but if he decided to rush across the yard and attack me I'm fairly sure he would get tangled up in his own pants before he made the distance. Again, there was nothing violent or dangerous in his behavior up to this point, and talking to him doesn't necessarily involve approaching him.

    I think you and wife handled it pretty well. I'm very impressed with your handling of the gun, though there were other good alternatives. You found a way to take the gun out of the mix after making a determination that it wasn't needed. Many here would be insistent about making sure the gun was included in the mix.

    I'm glad everyone ended up OK.

    God looks after drunks and little children...





    nobucks wrote:
    My best friend had something like that happen a couple of winters ago.

    A guy was rattling his doorknob at 5:30am. He got up and asked who was there, and the guy replied, "Chad." My buddy says, "What do you want?" Answer: "I'm cold." He decided to open the door, and, in sub-zero weather, there's this stoned guy wearing flip-flops, ripped up jeans, and a t-shirt. It turned out he got lost while walking home, and was hypothermic. My buddy ended up giving the guy a ride home, although, again, I think I would have called the local PD to taxi him home.
    Good thing the guy opened the door. Probably saved the goof with a buzz.

    Giving the guy a ride home or calling the PD to do it...either one is a good alternative in this situation.

  8. #8
    Regular Member Ironbar's Avatar
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    frommycolddeadhands wrote:
    Q. Why would he think our house was vacant?

    A. They take the kid aside, search him and don't find anything aside from a few miniature bottles of booze in his pockets.

    THere were probably a lot more minature bottles of booze on him when the night started.

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