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Thread: Medal of Honor Ceremony at the UW

  1. #1
    Campaign Veteran gogodawgs's Avatar
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    Oct 2009
    Federal Way, Washington, USA

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    Tomorrow the University of Washington will honor Medal of Honor winners. The UW has more than any other public university (other than the service academies). There will be 16 living MOH receipients present when a new MOH memorial is revealed. If you get the chance, GO! You will get chills to be in the presence of these men. God Bless our soldiers and our veterans, because freedom is not free.

    Thanks to all that have served. Including my wife.
    Live Free or Die!

  2. #2
    State Researcher Bill Starks's Avatar
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    Dec 2007
    Nortonville, KY, USA

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    Every Christmas the men of A Co. 1/72 Armor, Camp Casey, Korea would get a card from MSG Ernest Kouma. When my mid tour leave came up I suggested we have an award made up from downtown and I would take it to him since he was about 2 hrs from my hometown. I had a great time talking to him and let me tell you, when he pulled that medal from its case it was chilling. Sad to say he passed away 4 years later. There is a Tank range named after him at Camp Casey.
    Rank and organization: Master Sergeant (then Sfc.) U.S. Army, Company A, 72d Tank Battalion.
    Place and date: Vicinity of Agok, Korea, 31 August and 1 September 1950.
    Entered service at: Dwight, Nebr. Born: 23 November 1919, Dwight, Nebr. G.O. No.: 38, 4 June 1951.
    Citation: M/Sgt. Kouma, a tank commander in Company A, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. His unit was engaged in supporting infantry elements on the Naktong River front. Near midnight on 31 August, a hostile force estimated at 500 crossed the river and launched a fierce attack against the infantry positions, inflicting heavy casualties. A withdrawal was ordered and his armored unit was given the mission of covering the movement until a secondary position could be established. The enemy assault overran 2 tanks, destroyed 1 and forced another to withdraw. Suddenly M/Sgt. Kouma discovered that his tank was the only obstacle in the path of the hostile onslaught. Holding his ground, he gave fire orders to his crew and remained in position throughout the night, fighting off repeated enemy attacks. During 1 fierce assault, the enemy surrounded his tank and he leaped from the armored turret, exposing himself to a hail of hostile fire, manned the .50 caliber machine gun mounted on the rear deck, and delivered pointblank fire into the fanatical foe. His machine gun emptied, he fired his pistol and threw grenades to keep the enemy from his tank. After more than 9 hours of constant combat and close-in fighting, he withdrew his vehicle to friendly lines. During the withdrawal through 8 miles of hostile territory, M/Sgt. Kouma continued to inflict casualties upon the enemy and exhausted his ammunition in destroying 3 hostile machine gun positions. During this action, M/Sgt. Kouma killed an estimated 250 enemy soldiers. His magnificent stand allowed the infantry sufficient time to reestablish defensive positions. Rejoining his company, although suffering intensely from his wounds, he attempted to resupply his tank and return to the battle area. While being evacuated for medical treatment, his courage was again displayed when he requested to return to the front. M/Sgt. Kouma's superb leadership, heroism, and intense devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and uphold the esteemed traditions of the U.S. Army.

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