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Thread: KelTec P11

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    I finally shot the P11 I bought a few weeks ago. I have the trigger almost touching the grip before the hammer drops and there is almost no tension on the trigger until that point. I'm just wondering if that is normal on this gun and I just haven't shot something with that long of a pull, or if it sounds like something is wrong with it.

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    Probably because it's DAO (double action only).

    Nothing wrong with it....made for self defense.

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    Regular Member SouthernBoy's Avatar
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    When I owned a P11, I removed the action assembly and really smoothed out the hammer and trigger action. I also installed a lighter spring and a trigger shoe. Big difference in the gun's feel.

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    Long, relatively easy trigger pull is normal for these guns. If you were to take it apart you'd find that it is unique in that it uses an expanding "screen door" spring instead of a compression spring as most guns do. That does make the trigger feel lighter and a bit "strange."

    When I bought one for my daughter last year, I visited <http://www.ktog.org/> and followed the directions for a "fluff-and-buff" found there. I also used the suggestion someone posted there to take a pencil eraser and glue it to the back of the trigger. Trim the eraser until the trigger goes back far just enough to reliably drop the hammer but no farther. That makes an excellent trigger stop and really does help improve your accuracy.

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    Moderator / Administrator Grapeshot's Avatar
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    brolin_1911a1 wrote:
    Long, relatively easy trigger pull is normal for these guns. If you were to take it apart you'd find that it is unique in that it uses an expanding "screen door" spring instead of a compression spring as most guns do. That does make the trigger feel lighter and a bit "strange."

    When I bought one for my daughter last year, I visited <http://www.ktog.org/> and followed the directions for a "fluff-and-buff" found there. I also used the suggestion someone posted there to take a pencil eraser and glue it to the back of the trigger. Trim the eraser until the trigger goes back far just enough to reliably drop the hammer but no farther. That makes an excellent trigger stop and really does help improve your accuracy.
    Or glue it to the inside rear of the trigger guard - trick taught to be by Fred Schmidt (RIP) who built some fantastic PPC guns. Actually used the compression point of the rubber stop to complete the last little bit of the squeeze, dropping the hammer.

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    Grapeshot wrote:
    brolin_1911a1 wrote:
    Long, relatively easy trigger pull is normal for these guns. If you were to take it apart you'd find that it is unique in that it uses an expanding "screen door" spring instead of a compression spring as most guns do. That does make the trigger feel lighter and a bit "strange."

    When I bought one for my daughter last year, I visited <http://www.ktog.org/> and followed the directions for a "fluff-and-buff" found there. I also used the suggestion someone posted there to take a pencil eraser and glue it to the back of the trigger. Trim the eraser until the trigger goes back far just enough to reliably drop the hammer but no farther. That makes an excellent trigger stop and really does help improve your accuracy.
    Or glue it to the inside rear of the trigger guard - trick taught to be by Fred Schmidt (RIP) who built some fantastic PPC guns. Actually used the compression point of the rubber stop to complete the last little bit of the squeeze, dropping the hammer.

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    Oh, god. How old am I getting? I heard about the eraser technique when Hector was a pup. So long ago I completely forgot about it. And just happen to have a use for it.

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    Regular Member hopnpop's Avatar
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    brolin_1911a1 wrote:
    Long, relatively easy trigger pull is normal for these guns. If you were to take it apart you'd find that it is unique in that it uses an expanding "screen door" spring instead of a compression spring as most guns do. That does make the trigger feel lighter and a bit "strange."
    I have to state my contradictory opinion here. I have a P11 and I've always considered the trigger pull to be rather tough. It IS, of course, a long pull, but I've always thought the pull to be stiff as hell. I've never tested it but I'd have to guesstimate the pull at around 8 pounds or so. Personally, I like it that way on this particular gun, as it's got no other "safety" mechanism. The long, tough pull doesn't do much for accuracy, but this type of gun isn't made for target accuracy as it is for defensive/combat accuracy. Maintaining combat accuracy with this gun isn't a problem. With no other safety features, having along, stiff pull is the only way I'd carry it.

    I have noticed, however, that once the slack on the trigger had been taken up and it's close to the break, it does seem to lose some tension... very similar to the pull of a compound bow. A tough, stiff pull until it's at it's release point. Under what I consider normal shooting with this gun, it's barely perceptable since I shoot this gun strictly in a defensive manner.I don't carry mine anymore,as I've gotten guns I'm more fond of carrying, but it'll always have its place in thepile.
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    proud_to_serveUSAF wrote:
    I have the trigger almost touching the grip before the hammer drops and there is almost no tension on the trigger until that point.
    This is done intentionally to prevent a discharge while pocket carrying or during a hasty draw. It is a deliberate design feature. You cannot pull the trigger to the point of discharge unless you REALLY mean it. In the absence of an actual safety, this is close.

    The P-32 and P-3AT are like that, too. It can be 'fixed,' I suppose... But it is meant to be like that.

    I appreciate it on my P-32.
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