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Thread: open carry to private social events

  1. #1
    McX
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    i thought of something different i haven't seen discussed here; open carry to private social events; do you carry to visit a friend? to you carry to social gatherings on private property? do you carry to weddings, funerals? yes, i know it's not real open carry, being on private property, but i'd like to hear experiences shared; how were you treated by your host? other "party goers"? how are you treated by your friends when you show up to visit armed?

  2. #2
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    Doug Huffman wrote:
    I am blessed to have known and been close friend with such a hero.

    To keep it OT; I was very discretely armed while at Dockside, even to my fiancee POSSLQ seldom noticing my CCW. In SC an LAC is required to receive explicit permission to enter another's home while armed.

    Entering Col. Webb's apartment while armed I would open my jacket to show him my piece while watching his eyes and face. His eyes lighting up and his big grin were my permission. I would put my piece in the folds of my jacket as I honored him by disarming, depending on his hospitality for our personal protection.

    Col. Webb kept his service 1911 in his desk.

    Apropos my association with Grass Roots Gun Rights South Carolina, it was here at Dockside's commons that I hosted GRGRSC's LTS-II with friend TG.

    I wrote the below to my e-mail list.
    ================================================== ========
    One of my favorite connections between my old life and my new life on the Island is Joan telling me that she remembers her visit to Dockside, the condominium community that Pat and I moved from. There, Clay and Joan Blair interviewed Captain Arnold 'Ike' Holtz USN ret., a WWII submarine captain.

    Tuesday, 12 May 2009, we attended the community's BYOB drop-in that is hosted by Colonel John [redacted] while he is here in Charleston. During the winter months he and his wife, Hildy, live in Aspen, Colorado. I was host of the BYOB during the winter months while I lived at Dockside.

    At the drop-in I learned that Ike Holtz had passed away some months ago, at about 96 years of life, but aware and active to the end.

    That note is for Joan.

    When we arrived, we were told that our dearest Dockside friend was
    feeling too poorly to come down to the drop-in. We went up to Colonel George Kenneth Webb's apartment to wish him well. Pat has known Col. Webb for thirty years, since the early days of Seabrook Island as a community. I was not privileged to know him for so long but we had a rapport from our first meeting. Col. Webb was dressed, up and about, when we saw him but grumbling about his infirmities and very bad eyesight. We chatted and assured him that we would see him next week, hoping that he would be heartier then.

    Wednesday afternoon, 13 May 2009, we learned that Col. Webb had passed away within the hour after seeing us, perhaps his last mortal contact. I am heartened and burdened that he may have waited to see me before going on.

    Here's his newspaper biography, though it is likely of interest only to me and other lovers of Atlas' helpers that also bear the burdens of the World.

    George Kenneth Webb CHARLESTON - Entered into eternal rest on the
    evening of May 12, 2009, Colonel George Kenneth Webb, widower of Frances Cameron Scarborough Webb. Residence, Charleston, SC.

    The relatives and friends are invited to attend his funeral services in The Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul, Saturday, May 16, 2009 at eleven o'clock. Interment, Magnolia Cemetery. Friends may call at J. HENRY STUHR, INC., DOWNTOWN CHAPEL, Friday between four and six o'clock.

    Colonel George Kenneth Webb was born in Portsmouth, Ohio on November 30, 1919, the son of Frank L. Webb and Bess Williamson Webb. He is one of the veterans who served in three major conflicts, World War II, The Korean War and The Viet Nam Conflict.

    He was educated in public schools in Portsmouth, Ohio and attended
    Kentucky Military Institute in Lyndon, Kentucky. He graduated from the Citadel with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1943 and earned a Masters Degree in International Affairs from George Washington University in 1963. Colonel Webb graduated from the Command and General Staff College in Leavenworth, Kansas, The Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Virginia, and the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

    His military career started at Ft. Benning as an instructor and tactical officer at Camp Chaffee. From there he was deployed to the 7th Armored Division in Europe where he received a battlefield promotion to 1st Lt. He was wounded at the Battle of the Bulge.

    After the war he left the army and returned to Portsmouth, Ohio where he and Bob Moore ran a lumber business.

    He was recalled to active duty and assigned to the Army Infantry School teaching tactics. He went to armor school and from there he went to Korea. Upon returning from the Korean War he was assigned to the Citadel as a Tactical Officer. In 1958 he went to the Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, VA. From there he went to the Army Staff and Office of the Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon. From Washington he went to the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

    He returned to the Citadel, at the request of General Mark Clark, where he served as the Professor of Military Science and also as the acting Commandant of Cadets. In 1967-68 he served in Viet Nam as the senior advisor to the Vietnamese National Training Center. In 1968-70 he commanded a brigade at Ft. Knox, Ky and later was the Chief of Staff of the Armor Training Center. In 1970-71 he returned to Viet Nam as the Deputy Chief of Staff II Field Force. After Viet Nam he was assigned as the Executive Officer to the Commander in Chief of US Army Europe.

    Col. Webb's awards and decorations include a Silver Star for valor, 4 Legions of Merit, 2 Bronze Stars, the Combat Infantry Badge and the Purple Heart. He also received 22 additional campaign, service and achievement decorations.

    After retirement from the Army in 1973, Col Webb worked as the Executive Director for the Charleston Executive Association. He was the manager for the Downtown Counsel of the Chamber of Commerce. From 1981 to 1998 he bought and operated off-shore fishing boats, the Osprey and the Osprey II, from Bohicket Marina at Seabrook, SC and Palm Beach, FL.

    He is survived by two daughters, Cameron Webb Stuhr and her husband
    Johnny of Charleston, SC and Diane Webb Street and her husband Randy of LaFayette, GA. He has four grandchildren, John and Frances Stuhr, Michael and his wife Mandy and Phillip Street. He also has two great grandchildren, Joel and Daniel Street. He was predeceased by his wife of fifty-three years, Frances Cameron Scarborough Webb and his son, Thomas Yancey Webb.

    Memorials may be made to the Association of the Blind, 1071 Morrison Drive, Charleston, SC 29403 or to The Cathedral of St. Luke and St. Paul, 126 Coming Street, Charleston, SC 29403.

  3. #3
    Campaign Veteran skidmark's Avatar
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    Open carry to social events at the home of others depends on the invitation - as in if you invited me you ought to know you invited my handgun as well. As I threwuits, sportscoats and ties when I retired I have little option for "dressing up" and thus concealing my "social event" [AKA BBQ or Court] guns. At best you might get a somewhat refined vest.

    I've OCd at the funeral of two persons who were RKBA champions during their lives. My observation was that just about everyone was carrying, with the majority OCing.

    While I try to avoid weddings, there have been a bunch of RKBA-oriented bloggers who have posted about carrying at their weddings or the weddings of their offspring. Several were full-blown OC events.

    Regarding the reactions of friends when I show up armed - the question might be better phrased to ask about their response if I show up unarmed. Raised eyebrows and inquiries as to my curent legal status and why they were not informed/invited.

    stay safe.

    skidmark
    "He'll regret it to his dying day....if ever he lives that long."----The Quiet Man

    Because stupidity isn't a race, and everybody can win.

    "No matter how much contempt you have for the media in all this, you don't have enough"
    ----Allahpundit

  4. #4
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    I have only had one 'friend' offended at me for coming to his house armed. He asked me not to visit with my gun anymore. Wasn't needed at his house.Never been back....about10 years now.

    Yes. I go everywhere armed. CC or OC....however I feel. Or need.

  5. #5
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    Most of the friends and family I routinely visit know about my OC and CC beliefs, and so they know that when I come to visit, I'll most likely be carrying in SOME mode, but I usually let them know if I'm CCing, and I'll usually let them know ahead of time that I'll be OCing when we talk on the phone.

    My sister and father don't have an issue with it. My stepdaughters live in MD, so carry isn't an option, but when they visit here, they know I'll be carrying almost 24/7 and don't have an issue with it. The daughter who lived here last fall was actually glad that I carried all the time, and she knew where I stored everything and was quite proficient in the use of my firearms--which made us BOTH more comfortable knowing she could handle herself when she was home alone late at night while I worked night shifts...

    My friends who live in VA know I carry and don't have any issues.

    As for funerals, here in NC, it is actually illegal to carry at a funeral, as well at parades, and in any venue that charges admission (like a concert or theater) or in any establishment that sells alchohol for consumption on-premise.

    Funny thing is, there is no prohibition on carrying at weddings or birthdays, or at "free" events like municipal celebrations, free concerts, or the like...
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

  6. #6
    McX
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    thank you for contributing, and sharing your experiences. my friend and i are 'concert goers', we began going 10 years ago, and have seen over 35 artists. our plan is see them before they or us are dead. i'm always amazed at how we are treated when we enter a venue; i seem able to pass without incident, but my friend always gets plenty of attention- pat downs, wand sweeps, etc. the worst i had was at the chicago theater. i was detained, patted down, and had a cop right in my face, inches away, while he did this. i can't figure out why a pair of old guys would constitute a threat to the general public. especially when they after they feel us up, we go on about our business, and hit the t-shirt sales booth. somehow i don't think terrorists stop to buy t-shirts, at $45 a whack. i wonder how these places would respond to open or concealed carriers. still i dream of going to Milwaukee Summerfest someday, with oc allowed. that would truly be a sight to behold, hundreds of ocers, enjoying the park, and the festivities, and nothing would happen. i realize chances of that are slim, as alcohol is served at many events.

  7. #7
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    I've done like skidmark has, just went to a co-worker's house carrying, been to

    funerals, and just about anywhere i go. Shoot, i'm at home and got it on my hip.

  8. #8
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    My best friend owns a house and rents out several rooms year round. He supports me carrying openly, all the time. However, his roomates and their assorted friends, can play some funny games.

    If the population, in the party location, is limited to very close friends and their close friends- then I usually get this:

    I walk in, strapped, and say my greetings. Immediatly, the un-oriented will examine my pistol on my hip and avoid eye contact. It takes about 30 minutes to a full hour before a friend's friend will have the courage to muster something like

    "Is that a real gun?" "What is that?" "A few of my friends have their CCWs..." or my favorite "Why do you have a gun?" and sometimes "Are you a cop?"

    After the akward initial questioning- I state a few talking points and move on. I never stay on the subject because, to everyone else, it's a broken record.



    Now if the party population is my friends, my friend's friends and their friends too- I try to avoid questions from anyone that's under the influence. I simply smile and give a one word answer and walk away or turn away. If someone, sober, wants to have a genuine conversation, I will go ahead and attempt to educate.



    Here is what I try to avoid- At a party- carrying openly- lots of friends and other random people... Guy is a little buzzed and attemps his first "Is that a gun?" approach... I say yes and try to turn away. The guy attemps a second "Is that a gun?" and I say Yes and ask if he's a gun owner (Trying to start and then end a conversion quickly)... Well at this point- He pulls out a switch blade knife and promises that he has no need for a gun, with his sharp knife and all...

    Friendly or not- a drunk man with a sharp knife in his hand- is NOT where I want to be while carrying my pistol. I give a one word response and try to walk away..

    Now this guy is going off, loudly, to everyone else in the room- Something like "I have this knife I can stab and kill you so fast blah blah no gun can hurt me I will disarm your gun and stab you blah blah" Not directed AT ME but just at the idea that his knife is superior to my firearm.


    The drunk guy was my friend's roomate- so I left the party. Drunk guy apologized the next day for being intoxicated on more than one substance.


    Point here- At private social events- I always carry- but I always know I may have to leave because of it- and not because I'm not welcome- but because there are offending actions and activities around me while carrying.



  9. #9
    Regular Member Decoligny's Avatar
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    cscitney87 wrote:
    Here is what I try to avoid- At a party- carrying openly- lots of friends and other random people... Guy is a little buzzed and attemps his first "Is that a gun?" approach... I say yes and try to turn away. The guy attemps a second "Is that a gun?" and I say Yes and ask if he's a gun owner (Trying to start and then end a conversion quickly)... Well at this point- He pulls out a switch blade knife and promises that he has no need for a gun, with his sharp knife and all...

    Friendly or not- a drunk man with a sharp knife in his hand- is NOT where I want to be while carrying my pistol. I give a one word response and try to walk away..

    Now this guy is going off, loudly, to everyone else in the room- Something like "I have this knife I can stab and kill you so fast blah blah no gun can hurt me I will disarm your gun and stab you blah blah" Not directed AT ME but just at the idea that his knife is superior to my firearm.

    The drunk guy was my friend's roomate- so I left the party. Drunk guy apologized the next day for being intoxicated on more than one substance.

    Point here- At private social events- I always carry- but I always know I may have to leave because of it- and not because I'm not welcome- but because there are offending actions and activities around me while carrying.
    Alcohol shuts off the inhibitions that keep people from doing stupid things.

    If a drunk at a party pulls a knife, I consider it an imminent threat, not only to me, but to anyone around him. He will lose the knife and have a sprained wrist at the very least (if he is lucky).

  10. #10
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    Back in the late summer of 2009, the town of Minocqua hosted an event named "Gangster Night" to celebrate the opening of the movie "Public Enemy" which had several weeks of filming in and around the area over a year ago.
    It was about John Dillinger's life.
    Period correct cars lined the streets, and several people dressed the correct way for the period too. Many carried fake plastic Thompson Sub-Machine guns and other "Gangster" paraphernalia.

    A bunch of us from a dog training group I belong to went with our German Shepherds, wemet up for the event with our dogs as a socialization exercise to verifyour dogs would follow simple obedience commands with so many distractions around and to make sure they did not act aggressively towards the wrong people.
    Some of these pooches are protection dogs, others are trainedin Schutzhund & mondio, along with Agility & tracking too. It was kinda neat seeing a dozen or so different colored Shepherds sitting in a row on the sidewalk with their leashes laying on the ground while they were just watching people walk past and not moving.

    I wore my bi-tone .40 XDm (OD green & Black) to the event.

  11. #11
    McX
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    cscitney sounds like you were the only one behaving well at that party! Nutzak; growing up i knew a guy out toward union grove who trained dog- i know exactly what shutzhund means- impresses the hell out of me. stories are as good here as out in the public sector. things happen everywhere public, and private.

  12. #12
    McX
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    i think we come here to read and learn, to share our experiences, and for each of us to consider: how would i have handled that? the story of the chump with the switch blade knife kinda got me thinking. i could see alot of ways that situation could have gone bad. drunk, and armed with an illegal weapon (as defined in our state), plus brandishing, and attempting to incite!!!! my solution would have been to go to the host and say; i am legally carrying a holstered firearm. i am not consuming alcohol. this individual present is in possession of an illegal weapon, drunk, brandishing it, and attempting to incite me. please ask this individual to surrender his knife to you, and return it to him as he leaves for the safety of ALL envolved here, and present at this party. this guy was extrememly lucky that you were a calm individual, and not easily enticed to defend yourself.

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