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Thread: Off-duty N.C. Deputy kills robber

  1. #1
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    Young robber chooses wrong victim.

    http://www.witn.com/home/headlines/80399242.html

    http://www.reflector.com/news/sheriff-deputy-acted-in-self-defense-teen-killed-1042569.html

    http://www.reflector.com/news/citize...g-1043293.html

  2. #2
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    i love how so many of the commenters say that the armed robber "wasn't a bad person, he just made a bad decision"...

    I don't know about you folks, but in MY book, anyone who points a gun at other people in an attempt to rob them is pretty much a "bad person". I think he made a LOT of bad decisions (like where did he get his gun--sure as hell NOT from a dealer, as he was 19). He had previous DUI charges, and a driving without a license charge. The LAST bad decision he made was pulling a gun on someone who was (unknown to him) an armed, trained, off-duty Deputy Sheriff.

    Stuff like this happens all the time around here, and people still wonder why we Open Carry? If that deputy had been OCing (instead of CCing, as required by Pitt County Sheriff's Dept policy) this young "proto-thug" might have passed him up, and just walked on down the road.

    This armed assailant's family needs to come to terms with the fact that their "little wayward angel" was a wanna-be thug, and was well on his way to a life of crime, thuggery, and mayhem. Luckily for the HONEST citizens of Eastern NC, his felonious career was stopped short, in what appears to be a VERY legitimate self-defense situation.

    My prayers go out to Deputy Odom and HIS family. This guy is just a rookie, and this is NOT a pleasant way to begin his career in Law Enforcement in Pitt County. I only hope that his ability to defend himself while off duty and out of uniform will inform his future dealings with LAC's who ALSO choose to carry in Pitt County. Hopefully he will be friendly, understanding, and will follow NC law if he ever has to deal with a law-abiding citizen who is carrying lawfully in the future.

    As for the family of the deceased criminal, I pray that they may get a clue, and stop raising potential thugs...
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    At least the family of the deceased robber isn't blaming the deputy for the kids death.

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    I hate how they repeatedly use the term "teen." The first thing that comes to my mind when I hear "teen" is a child 13-17. At 19 he is an adult plane and simple.
    New to OPEN CARRY in California? Click and read this first...
    Stolen from ConditionThree because it can't be stressed enough.

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    What do you guys think would be the best way to inform Mr. Abramowitz that there is no such thing as a "properly registered gun"? It really bugs me that the media continues to misinform the public about such things. The only "registered" guns in NC belong to law enforcement and armed security guards if I recall correctly.

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    I am glad the deputy is ok. [incomplete thought removed]


    Scrub wrote:

    What do you guys think would be the best way to inform Mr. Abramowitz that there is no such thing as a "properly registered gun"? It really bugs me that the media continues to misinform the public about such things. The only "registered" guns in NC belong to law enforcement and armed security guards if I recall correctly.
    I don't know. The information regarding "properly registered" came from the DA:

    Private citizens have the right to defend themselves with a properly registered gun or other deadly force if they believe their lives are threatened, District Attorney Clark Everett said Thursday. Sheriff Mac Manning said every person can learn from the incident.
    I think you just have to tell them how it is. There is no requirement or need for firearm registration in North Carolina, period.

  7. #7
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    In fact, many Sheriffs in NC will actually discourage you from registering your firearms with them because they don't have any realistically effective system for keeping the records, or making them available to State LEA's for investigations anyway...

    Perhaps a few calls to the DA in Pitt County is in order, to help educate him on this. It's actually LEGAL in NC to defend yourself with ANY firearm you are legally able to own and possess--registered or not...

    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    I also get tired of the statements, "He was a good boy," "He never meant to hurt anybody," "He needed therapy, medication, etc.," "Just because he was stealing doesn't mean he deserved to die," and other things. Sorry if it sounds harsh but we need a society with normal people. By "normal," I mean people that for the most part know right from wrong and do the right thing. That generally means people who get up in the morning and go to work, pay their taxes, are registered voters, and don't go around committing crimes. Granted, people can be as eccentric or unusual as they want to be as long as they aren't bothering other people or abusing other's freedom. People who decide that they want to live life begging, borrowing, and stealing, acting up in public places, rudely staring at others in threatening manners, loitering around for no legitimate purpose, and ultimately committing crimes against people and property should not be surprised when someday they face consequences. They have nobody to blame but themselves should they still be alive. Enough of this, "He came from a bad home" crap. It is called personal responsibility.



  9. #9
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    chewy352 wrote:
    I hate how they repeatedly use the term "teen." The first thing that comes to my mind when I hear "teen" is a child 13-17. At 19 he is an adult plane and simple.
    The REAL tragedy of this incident, is that this young thug will now go down in the "children killed by CHP holders" in the statistics of the Brady Campaign. For their "studies", they consider ANY person under the age of 21 to be a "child", and ANY person killed--even a criminal killed in self-defense, to be a legitimate entry in their database...

    If only the general public knew how the Brady's and their ilk compiled their data, the anti's might be shamed into silence...
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    protector84 wrote:
    I also get tired of the statements, "He was a good boy," "He never meant to hurt anybody," "He needed therapy, medication, etc.," "Just because he was stealing doesn't mean he deserved to die," and other things. Sorry if it sounds harsh but we need a society with normal people. By "normal," I mean people that for the most part know right from wrong and do the right thing. That generally means people who get up in the morning and go to work, pay their taxes, are registered voters, and don't go around committing crimes. Granted, people can be as eccentric or unusual as they want to be as long as they aren't bothering other people or abusing other's freedom. People who decide that they want to live life begging, borrowing, and stealing, acting up in public places, rudely staring at others in threatening manners, loitering around for no legitimate purpose, and ultimately committing crimes against people and property should not be surprised when someday they face consequences. They have nobody to blame but themselves should they still be alive. Enough of this, "He came from a bad home" crap. It is called personal responsibility.

    Yes, the news can never take into account the person and his own actions. Like the Fort Hood muslim terrorist shooting... it wasn't because he was declaring a jihad.. oh no, it was because "he was afraid to be shipped off to war". Hmm last time I checked you don't shoot up 20 people because you are afraid of shooting in a war.

    This kid knew what he was doing.Ignorant liberals always have to justify other peoples stupid ass actions with illogicalreasons. Whether it be that terrorist, that kid, gun control or higher taxes.

  11. #11
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    I do believe that we live in a normal society where most people are law abiding and want to be that way. A normal society has criminal elements, it is human nature, we will always have to deal with criminal minds. I also believe some people intend to be malicious and criminal and others fall down into it, for whatever reason.

    Some people were good, were raised in a good home, did well in school, were excellent athletes, great to their wives, husbands, girlfriends, boyfriends, children, friends, co-workers, etc... Until, for whatever reason, they went bad; they fell down. We all have the necessary components to do bad, but like protector84 said, personal responsibility comes into play.

    Some people's level of integrity are different from others. Othersbelieve personal resposibility should be thrown out of the door in some cases. People's desperation often get the better of them. They don't think about (indifference of good men), care less, or care little about those individuals and their loved ones that may be affected by illegal actions.

    In the end, if you do wrong, regardless of your reasoning, I don't care if you're trying to get money to get your child's life-dependent prescription filled or to pay for that surgery. The moment you cross the line into a criminal act, you're subject to the same retribution as any other criminal. If that means being arrested, so be it. If that means being shot dead by a law-abiding citizen or an on or off-duty peace officer, so be it. No person,for no reason, has the right to deprive any citizen of the United Statesof life or liberty and so helpthem shouldthey be sent totheir version of the Creator or if so chosen, Oblivion.

    "If you put it on the floor, it can't fall off..."

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    Dreamer wrote:
    i love how so many of the commenters say that the armed robber "wasn't a bad person, he just made a bad decision"...

    I don't know about you folks, but in MY book, anyone who points a gun at other people in an attempt to rob them is pretty much a "bad person". I think he made a LOT of bad decisions (like where did he get his gun--sure as hell NOT from a dealer, as he was 19). He had previous DUI charges, and a driving without a license charge. The LAST bad decision he made was pulling a gun on someone who was (unknown to him) an armed, trained, off-duty Deputy Sheriff.

    Stuff like this happens all the time around here, and people still wonder why we Open Carry? If that deputy had been OCing (instead of CCing, as required by Pitt County Sheriff's Dept policy) this young "proto-thug" might have passed him up, and just walked on down the road.

    This armed assailant's family needs to come to terms with the fact that their "little wayward angel" was a wanna-be thug, and was well on his way to a life of crime, thuggery, and mayhem. Luckily for the HONEST citizens of Eastern NC, his felonious career was stopped short, in what appears to be a VERY legitimate self-defense situation.

    My prayers go out to Deputy Odom and HIS family. This guy is just a rookie, and this is NOT a pleasant way to begin his career in Law Enforcement in Pitt County. I only hope that his ability to defend himself while off duty and out of uniform will inform his future dealings with LAC's who ALSO choose to carry in Pitt County. Hopefully he will be friendly, understanding, and will follow NC law if he ever has to deal with a law-abiding citizen who is carrying lawfully in the future.

    As for the family of the deceased criminal, I pray that they may get a clue, and stop raising potential thugs...
    It may be true. It doesn't change anything. Just because a perp does something that justifies dropping him doesn't dehumanize him.

    Maybe he really was just in a bad place and trying to do the best he could.
    Maybe he had the potential to turn out a good stand up guy but was just a little lost.
    19 may be legally adulthood, but everyone knows most people are still stupid at 19.
    I feel bad for the kid.

    I feel sorry for him.
    It was such a waste of human life.
    I wish he'd had the opportunity to grow up in a better environment.
    It is horrible that a kid died.
    I feel so sorry for the loss the kid's family and friends are being put through.

    I'd of shot him.

    I support the officer's actions.

    Being a pitiful kid changes nothing as far as the shooting is concerned. From experience, I can tell you it will actually help the healing process for the N.C. Officer if he accepts the perps humanity. I am surprised the officer is going back to work so soon. He should take a few days off, he was just the victim of a crime where a kid was killed.
    illegal ≠ immoral legal ≠ moral
    [SIZE=1]"I never submitted the whole system of my opinions to the creed of any party of men whatever in religion, in philosophy, in politics, or in anything else where I was capable of thinking for myself. "Such an addiction is the last degradation of a free and moral agent." - Thomas Jefferson
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