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Thread: HB 2507: Relating to the discharging of firearms within a certain distance of a dwelling house

  1. #1
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    James M. "Jim" Mullins, Jr., Esq.
    Admitted to practice in West Virginia and Florida.

    Founder, Past President, Treasurer, and General Counsel, West Virginia Citizens Defense League, Inc.
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    If I read that correctly, it means I can't shoot within five hundred feet of my own house. It does say "any dwelling house". I ought to be able to decide whether I want to go out in my yard and shoot if I want to (given that the bullet would drop to the ground well before it gets within range of my nearest neighbor, and that it won't do that because it'll hit a tree, first).
    Daniel L. Hawes - 540 347 2430 - HTTP://www.VirginiaLegalDefense.com

    By the way, nothing I say on this website as "user" should be taken as either advertising for attorney services or legal advice, merely personal opinion. Everyone having a question regarding the application of law to the facts of their situation should seek the advice of an attorney competent in the subject matter of the issues presented and licensed to practice in the relevant state.

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    Wow... When I was a kid, we used to set up our bench on the front porch of our farm house, and shoot at targets set up agains the hillside in the side yard. We'd sight in our deer rifles and plink with my Ithica 22 rifle off the front porch. Sometimes we'd shoot clays from the front yard, out over the bottom field.

    I guess that would be illegal under this new law...

    Requiring people to get a permit to exercise their 2A rights on their OWN PROPERTY is a VERY dangerous (and arguably unconstitutional) law...

    Who proposed this law, the Martinsburg City Council?
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

  4. #4
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    The bill would have made the law less restrictive, but way too bureaucratic. However, it did not pass. We prefer a bill such as 2008 SB 677, which would create a simpler solution.
    James M. "Jim" Mullins, Jr., Esq.
    Admitted to practice in West Virginia and Florida.

    Founder, Past President, Treasurer, and General Counsel, West Virginia Citizens Defense League, Inc.
    Life Member, NRA

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    I assume I should be looking at the "comittee substitute". It wouldstill illegal to shoot on your own property within five hundred feet of someone else's house, even if you have their permission and are shooting away from their house onto your own property. I could live with that, I reckon. At least this way the wife and kids can kill dangerous soda cans in the yard with the .22 revolver without having to go to jail for it.

    Btw, it's already a federal felony to be in possession of any kind of firearms within one thousand feet of a school (with exceptions and exclusions, of course).
    Daniel L. Hawes - 540 347 2430 - HTTP://www.VirginiaLegalDefense.com

    By the way, nothing I say on this website as "user" should be taken as either advertising for attorney services or legal advice, merely personal opinion. Everyone having a question regarding the application of law to the facts of their situation should seek the advice of an attorney competent in the subject matter of the issues presented and licensed to practice in the relevant state.

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