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Thread: Just Have To Adjust

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    Ever reach for that top shelf item, at the store, only to have your shirt come back down over pistol grip and holster? Happened to me at King Soopers today. I had two issues here- first is the lack of CCW (don't need to be told to get that, thanks) and second- there were people everywhere.

    To point- I had my girlfriend swing the cart around and stand behind me to block any view. I quickly adjusted between the cart and taco kits. I felt like a criminal... If I had been alone, with a small hand basket, I would have found myself ... running to the bathroom? Imagine how that could look on a security camera..

    What do you guys do? I'm sure I can't be the only one...

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    I don't even think about it. I'll just adjust my shirt and go on with life. Are you afraid of brandishing by fixing your shirt? I think you would be just fine uncovering your weapon and going on with shopping. Maybe by your actions of trying to hide what you were fixing drew more attention to you then just doing it. I don't have much along the lines of hips so when walking down the street or in a store I must adjust my waist band which also means a quick holster adjustment. Its just second nature and any LEO will (should) under stand. I see them mess'in with their holster and belt all the time. I also am waiting for my CCW from jeffco. Still have up to 67 days left.

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    Yeah it's not that I'm afraid to brandish but I am afraid of making a move for my piece in public. Same with picking my wallet out of my back pocket- I do it very slowly, and avoid my piece while doing it. I don't want someone running off saying I have been placing my hand on my weapon. I'm fishing the forum to see if anyone's gotten in Hot water making public weapons/holster adjustments.

    Witness 1 "His hand went for the holster and I ran for my life, officer!"
    Witness 2 "I saw it too. He uncovered his weapon in the bread section and placed his hand on the holster. That's when I turned away to get management."
    Witness 3 "Yeah but he was just making sure everyone could see his gun. He doesn't have a permit to hide it yet."

    I guess I'm just paranoid.

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    cscitney87 wrote:
    What do you guys do?
    I carry my G21 OWB on my left side, so if I need to stretch up, I simply use my right arm. Maybe you were reaching for something heavy enough to require both arms...

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    I can tell you that I have carried OC and CC and in both cases I often adjust my belt, pants and holster, by putting my hand on my holster and the belt on the other side and adjust as needed. I don't think there is any problem, unless you pull the gun from the holster or possibly grab the gun's grip. Simply putting your hand on the outside of the holster and pulling your pants up or simply putting your shirt back in place is not an issue. Besides, simply putting your shirt back in place is not a problem, simply do it right away so it is to be seen and not hidden, since you didn't have your CCW. I carry my Glock 23 in a OWB Balckhawk holster for OC or CC (with a jacket on)and have never even received a glance, as far as I know, from anyone. Even when my gun was momentarialy exposed due to something like what you had done, reaching for something where I had to streach to get it.

    The more you do it, the less perrinoid you get about it and the more natural it feels.



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    yeah, i can relate, myself being new to carrying a pistol, I just keep waiting for hysteria to break out in public because some one sees me adjust my holster or reach
    for my wallet.

    I just keep telling myself, "you aren't doing anything illegal, stay calm, and the worst you may have to do is speak with an officer."


    Anyone know of any good resturants in the Greeley/Evans area to have a sit down meal while OC?

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    You exude a definitive different vibe when you're adjusting versus when you're brandishing or "fronting" as the kids like to say. People can tell the difference and so can a LEO unless they're already looking for an excuse. In that case, BREATHING is going to be interpreted as brandishing.

    I'm constantly touching my weapon, my cell phone, my keys, my wallet, my kids, just to make sure all are where they're supposed to be. But I do it subtly and unconciously in a manner that doesn't draw a lot of attention. You actually draw more attention trying to bediscreet than just going about your business like you're not doing anything wrong. 'Cause after all, like poster above said, you're not.

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    cscitney87 wrote:
    Ever reach for that top shelf item, at the store, only to have your shirt come back down over pistol grip and holster? Happened to me at King Soopers today. I had two issues here- first is the lack of CCW (don't need to be told to get that, thanks) and second- there were people everywhere.

    To point- I had my girlfriend swing the cart around and stand behind me to block any view. I quickly adjusted between the cart and taco kits. I felt like a criminal... If I had been alone, with a small hand basket, I would have found myself ... running to the bathroom? Imagine how that could look on a security camera..

    What do you guys do? I'm sure I can't be the only one...
    1.) Admission of guilt (carrying concealed without a license) is NEVER wise in a public forum such as this.

    2.) Was there a legal problem with open carry? (Living in Denver, posted no carry, etc.) If not, then you shouldn't have worried about it.

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    albritton77 wrote:
    1.) Admission of guilt (carrying concealed without a license) is NEVER wise in a public forum such as this.
    I thought that too and had to read it 5 times to figure out what OP was asking. I believe what he was saying is, suppose you are OCing. You reach for something and your shirt, etc. comes untucked and covers your weapon. How do you adjust back to OCwithout a) looking like you are going for your weapon, b) looking like you are trying to show off your weapon, and c) avoiding someone saying you were "temporarily" CCing without a CCW so therefore you broke the law if only briefly.

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    Oh.... I see.

    I'd just uncover it again and carry on with business.

    (Sorry about the mis-understanding.)

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    Every definition ive seen of brandishing would require removing the gun from the holster and displaying it in a threatening manor. SoI would think that adjusting your weapon wouldnt be an issue unless you drew it.



    AmI wrong?

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    Castle wrote:
    Every definition ive seen of brandishing would require removing the gun from the holster and displaying it in a threatening manor. So*I would think that adjusting your weapon wouldnt be an issue unless you drew it.

    *

    Am*I wrong?
    I don't believe so. Unless You place your hand on the grip or remove it, it's not brandishing. Now if you grab any part of your holster or weapon and say I'm ARMED, that is brandishing from what my father (LEO) tells me. But just adjusting your clothing is fine.

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    Thanks everyone.

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    Thats what were here for!

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    mahkagari wrote:
    albritton77 wrote:
    1.) Admission of guilt (carrying concealed without a license) is NEVER wise in a public forum such as this.
    I thought that too and had to read it 5 times to figure out what OP was asking. I believe what he was saying is, suppose you are OCing. You reach for something and your shirt, etc. comes untucked and covers your weapon. How do you adjust back to OCwithout a) looking like you are going for your weapon, b) looking like you are trying to show off your weapon, and c) avoiding someone saying you were "temporarily" CCing without a CCW so therefore you broke the law if only briefly.
    I did the exact same thing and then I realized the he said he shirt "COVERED" his weapon and that he was evidently OC'ing. At first I also thought he was concealing without a CCW.

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    Never had that problem, I tuck my shirts in.

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    The only time that ever happened was at a grocery store in 1993, around 10:30 pm.

    The guy asked, "Do you have a permit for a concealed weapon?" to which I replied, "Yes, Sir, I do, in accordance with federal, state, county, and local ordinances. Would you like to see it?"

    Fortunately, I did, but he declined, smiled, and said, "no, just checking." Turns out he was the mayor of the little town in which I lived at the time.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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    Positioning the palm of the hand on top of the grip in the absence of any verbal or non-verbal exhibition of threat does not constitute "brandishing". If I may borrow from NFL terminology - the handgun would have toeither be "out of the pocket" [or holster], or evidence "forward motion" in that direction. Such actionstill must be observable by one or more other persons who would reasonably be expected to concludethat such action was directed at them personally AND in a menacing manner.

    The only conceivable exception that I can think of would be someverbalization of a threatto harm another person,explicit or implied, connected to the displayed [but holstered]weapon. Obviously an officer making a traffic stop or confronting a person on foot greeted by a palm resting on the grip COULD reasonably be expected to consider the action "brandishing" .

    Theonly citationI can offer for this such a standard is common sense. Ultimately the presence of any REASONABLE threat would justify the "brandishing" in any event.

    My 2 pennies.


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    Rush Creek wrote:
    Positioning the palm of the hand on top of the grip in the absence of any verbal or non-verbal exhibition of threat does not constitute "brandishing". If I may borrow from NFL terminology - the handgun would have toeither be "out of the pocket" [or holster], or evidence "forward motion" in that direction. Such actionstill must be observable by one or more other persons who would reasonably be expected to concludethat such action was directed at them personally AND in a menacing manner.
    Awesome reply. Thank you, Rush Creek. Very informative.

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    Rush Creek wrote:
    Positioning the palm of the hand on top of the grip in the absence of any verbal or non-verbal exhibition of threat does not constitute "brandishing". If I may borrow from NFL terminology - the handgun would have toeither be "out of the pocket" [or holster], or evidence "forward motion" in that direction. Such actionstill must be observable by one or more other persons who would reasonably be expected to concludethat such action was directed at them personally AND in a menacing manner.

    The only conceivable exception that I can think of would be someverbalization of a threatto harm another person,explicit or implied, connected to the displayed [but holstered]weapon. Obviously an officer making a traffic stop or confronting a person on foot greeted by a palm resting on the grip COULD reasonably be expected to consider the action "brandishing" .

    Theonly citationI can offer for this such a standard is common sense. Ultimately the presence of any REASONABLE threat would justify the "brandishing" in any event.

    My 2 pennies.
    Great reply about the hand on the grip. I stand corrected. Thanks!
    This year will go down in history. For the first time, a civilized nation has full gun registration. Our streets will be safer, our police more efficient, and the world will follow our lead into the future! ~Adolph Hitler, 1935, on The Weapons Act of Nazi Germany

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    RushGrip, definately a great reply, and I would add:

    The average citizen may consider resting one's palm on the top of the grip as a "menacing gesture," even though it's not technically "brandishing," and act forbidden except in self-defence and seriously restricted in all states. i.e., if someone comes at you with a knife, you can draw your weapon (most states). Regardless, courts may construe the "menacing gesture" to be sufficient grounds for emotional pain and suffering. I personally believe this would be a misconstruation, but...

    The difference in draw and fire time between hands on and hands off is miniscule. Thus, I would keep my hand off the grip unless I had a reasonable belief the situation dictated that there was a substantial probability that I might need to draw and fire. If those conditions were met, I'd be hands on.

    Obviously, at any open display of imminent mayhem or lethal hostility, I'd draw and issue continued verbal warnings to attempt to get the perp to cease and desist. If the threat continued to the point where it became a choice between myself or the perp, I'd fire to protect life, limb, and where reasonable, property.
    The First protects the Second, and the Second protects the First. Together, they protect the rest of our Bill of Rights and our United States Constitution, and help We the People protect ourselves in the spirit of our Declaration of Independence.

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    just to add to this thread. i was in kings yesterday and found myself needing to adjust. my holster felt too high and was moving too much. i was walking down an aisle. i checked over my shoulder to make sure no one was behind me, then i made sure no one was in front of me, theni grabbed the holster and quickly adjusted it. i don't think that anyone would freak out any more than they would just by seeing the gun in the first place. if you act like its no big deal, i think most people will not even notice.

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