View Poll Results: Which stance do you use?

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  • Weaver

    8 26.67%
  • Isosceles

    4 13.33%
  • Both, depending on the situation

    11 36.67%
  • Neither, one handed; Dirty Harry style.

    2 6.67%
  • Gang style, sideways. (PS, I also can't hit the broad side of a barn.)

    5 16.67%
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Thread: Weaver vs. Isosceles

  1. #1
    Regular Member malignity's Avatar
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    Simple enough, which stance do you use when shooting? I learned on Weaver, but my CPL instructor taught Isosceles EXCLUSIVELY, and refused to teach us 'proper' Weaver stance. I try to stay Isosceles, however, always find myself going back to Weaver stance.

    What about you?
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  2. #2
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    with me it all depends on the situation. I found when I shoot weaver I tend to lean back. I try and train both and some other variations of kneeling, laying, off hand, etc.

  3. #3
    Regular Member Bikenut's Avatar
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    Stance? I have no intention of standing still! And I never practice standing still.

    Although I suppose while moving one could say I was using...

    Isosceles! No, not really... Weaver! No, not really... Body moving while crapping pants!.... Yeah... that's the one!
    Gun control isn't about the gun at all.... for those who want gun control it is all about their own fragile egos, their own lack of self esteem, their own inner fears, and most importantly... their own desire to dominate others. And an openly carried gun is a slap in the face to all of those things.

  4. #4
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    This is the stance I usually use, I'm not sure what it's called though.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cF-WeswkqXc

  5. #5
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    Bad case of tendinitis back in 81 or 82 so I'm pretty much stuck with the weaver. The Isosceles causes my arm toshake being extended like that. If I could add about 5 pounds or so to my Glock I might be able to do an Isosceles stance.

  6. #6
    Regular Member malignity's Avatar
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    kevron2020 wrote:
    with me it all depends on the situation. I found when I shoot weaver I tend to lean back. I try and train both and some other variations of kneeling, laying, off hand, etc.
    That's funny, I lean back when doing isosceles, especially if it's a gun I've never shot before. A friend of mine has a video of me shooting a .44 magnum, and I look terrified because I'm leaning back so far.
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  7. #7
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    malignity wrote:
    Simple enough, which stance do you use when shooting? I learned on Weaver, but my CPL instructor taught Isosceles EXCLUSIVELY, and refused to teach us 'proper' Weaver stance. I try to stay Isosceles, however, always find myself going back to Weaver stance.

    What about you?
    same with my instructor too. this may sounds silly but i love isosceles unless i am unloading an entire clip as fast as i can then i don't feel as stable as when i am in weaver, especially with my 30 rd mag.

    Devery

  8. #8
    Regular Member Taurus850CIA's Avatar
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    I use the Chapman stance. It looks like a sort of modified Weaver stance. It's what has always felt natural to me. Isosceles feels somewhat cumbersome.
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  9. #9
    Regular Member autosurgeon's Avatar
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    Weaver most of the time.
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  10. #10
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    Weaver.

    You can't shoot'n'scoot easily with isoceles.

    -Richard-

  11. #11
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    Isosceles...or some kind of home remedy variation of it.

    There are people (Swat types) that shoot sideways, because the recoil helps them move to their next target faster. But I'm sure the gang bangers are the only ones to do it one handed.
    Rand Paul 2016

  12. #12
    Regular Member malignity's Avatar
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    Surprisingly enough, TheSzerdi shoots almost exclusively one handed... and at 25 yards, can do tighter grouping with his 1911 than I can with my Glock using my normal stance. He uses the sights of course, not cocked sideways like a gang banger, but still, it's impressive to watch.

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    And people ask why I carry a 1911

  14. #14
    Regular Member malignity's Avatar
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    He's also been shooting since he could walk, and it's only been about 10 years for me. :P
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  15. #15
    Regular Member Bronson's Avatar
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    A while back I read an article that laid out some research done with officers who had been involved in shootings. The vast majority of them, regardless of what style they were trained in or how much training they had, resorted to a crouch with hips and shoulders facing the threat and firing one handed without using the sights. The article had a disturbing statistic that in the years since two handed, front sight focused shooting has beenin voguewith law enforcement the police, nationally, have an 85% miss rate in actual shootings.

    The author went on to say that this falls back to instinct. When threatened we tend to face what is threatening us and crouch and if we have something in our hand be it a stick, rock, or gun we hold it up between us and the threat. We also focus our attention and vision completely on the threat. His contention was thatshooters should first be taught to utilize these instinctual responses and learn one handed point shooting (not using the sights) and then move into two handed front sight focused shooting as a more advanced technique suitable for longer ranges.

    Lately I'vebeen practicing with this and am getting to the point where I can keep them all within the torso of a silhouette target while shooting one handed from the hip at about 20 ft. I also like the one handed shooting because it frees up my other hand to help deal with an attacker who is in contact range.

    Oh, and it's a heck of a lot of fun

    Bronson
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  16. #16
    Regular Member Yooper's Avatar
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    Bronson wrote:
    A while back I read an article that laid out some research done with officers who had been involved in shootings.¬* The vast majority of them, regardless of what style they were trained in or how much training they had, resorted to a crouch with hips and shoulders facing the threat and firing one handed without using the sights.¬* The article had a disturbing statistic that in the years since two handed, front sight focused shooting has been¬*in vogue¬*with law enforcement the police, nationally, have an 85% miss rate in actual shootings.

    The author went on to say that this falls back to instinct.¬* When threatened we tend to face what is threatening us and crouch and if we have something in our hand be it a stick, rock, or gun we hold it up between us and the threat.¬* We also focus our attention and vision completely on the threat.¬* His contention was that¬*shooters should first be taught to utilize these instinctual responses and learn one handed point shooting (not using the sights) and then move into two handed front sight focused shooting as a more advanced technique suitable for longer ranges.

    Lately I've¬*been practicing with this and am getting to the point where I can keep them all within the torso of a silhouette target while shooting one handed from the hip at about 20 ft.¬* I also like the one handed shooting because it frees up my other hand to help deal with an attacker who is in contact range.

    Oh, and it's a heck of a lot of fun

    Bronson
    I agree with what you said, although one handed shooting has never felt natural to me, but when I've subject myself to self defense style shooting scenarios I usually just point and shoot (2 hands). All the shooting was done between 3 and 15 yards. Of the dozen or so times I've done it, I've always had 35 to 39 shots out of 40 in the center mass or head area. Yet, when I try to shoot in a normal "plinking" stance, using sights I can't seem to hit anything.

    Same goes with my bow, which I don't have sights on. I can draw, look at the target, and let the arrow fly and be a lot better than if I sit there and try and figure out where I'm the arrow's going to hit.
    Rand Paul 2016

  17. #17
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    Bikenut wrote:
    Stance? I have no intention of standing still! And I never practice standing still.

    Although I suppose while moving one could say I was using...

    Isosceles! No, not really... Weaver! No, not really... Body moving while crapping pants!.... Yeah... that's the one!
    I would have to say I use both, but I do move quite a bit, I'm of the shoot, move, and stay alive school. I feel like I can move better with Isosceles[/quote], although I feel myself being more unorthodox.

  18. #18
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    SpringerXDacp wrote:
    Bad case of tendinitis back in 81 or 82 so I'm pretty much stuck with the weaver. The Isosceles causes my arm toshake being extended like that. If I could add about 5 pounds or so to my Glock I might be able to do an Isosceles stance.
    Do they make a 100 rd mag for that glock:shock:?:celebratespringerdave.

  19. #19
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    i am a weaver guy myself....

    i am obviously more accurate with 2 hands, but one interesting thing i have found about shooting one handed is that i am equally accurate with my right or left hand. This was surprising to me, because i can do very few things well with my left hand, i am very right hand dominate.
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  20. #20
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    I just close my eyes and pull the trigger.

  21. #21
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    Yooper wrote:
    Isosceles...or some kind of home remedy variation of it.

    There are people (Swat types) that shoot sideways, because the recoil helps them move to their next target faster. But I'm sure the gang bangers are the only ones to do it one handed.
    Hummmmm......

    Guess I'm a gang banger then. 90% of my shooting is one handed just like it used to be done in the Olympics. (well.. close to that, just not as accurate and faster)

  22. #22
    Regular Member Michigander's Avatar
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    I mostly practice one handedpoint shooting. Bronsonsummed up the reasons.
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  23. #23
    Regular Member malignity's Avatar
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    When I mentioned Gang Style, I was referring to cocking your gun sideways, and shooting like a.. (how do I put this politically correct?) African American; not using your sights, and with your pants on the ground.


    BEHOLD! GANG STYLE!


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  24. #24
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    AKA "Convenient store stance."


    If you are shooting "normal" and the clerk ducks behind the counter you can only move the gun into about a 60 degree angle due to the limitation is the wrist joint. If you go in "convenient sto' stance" (gun sideways) and the clerk ducks under the counter, you can rotate the pistol way past the 90 degree point to shoot him.

    Try it out sometime.

  25. #25
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    T Vance wrote:
    This is the stance I usually use, I'm not sure what it's called though.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cF-WeswkqXc
    well i knew you where a bad ass but can you teach me that move the one standing on the wall is the one i really want to learn

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