Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Holster for 1911, for IDPA/USPSA use?

  1. #1
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Grennsboro NC
    Posts
    5,358

    Post imported post

    I'm thinking about getting back into "practical shooting" competition (IDPA/USPSA) and wondered if there were any other folks out there who did this, and what sort of holsters they would recommend for a double-stack full-size 1911 like my Para.

    I'll probably just use the Serpa, but I was thinking of getting a holster without mechanical retention specifically for competition. I'll be competing in either "stock" or "Limited" class, and will not have a comp or optics on my gun.

    I'm leaning toward leather, if for no other reason than it will probably wear on my finish less (with the constant holstering and unholstering of competition) than Kydex or other plastic-style units. I'm looking at something outside the waistband, preferably with a slight cant. On top of my list is the Galco Side Snap Scabbard, mainly because it's lined, and because it's a design I can get on and off without having to undo my belt...

    But I DO love the speed and smoothness of my Serpa, and am looking at the Uncle Mike's kydex holsters and Blackhawk non-Serpa holsters.

    So what do y'all think? I don't want to make a string of expensive experimental mistakes, and I'd appreciate any imput that other competitive shooters might have.

    Thanks.
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

  2. #2
    Campaign Veteran GlockMeisterG21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Pewaukee, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    637

    Post imported post

    I use a Kimber for IDPA ant the holster I use is the Galco Side Snap Scabberd. Here is the link to it for a para.

    http://www.usgalco.com/HolsterPG3.as...2&GunID=68
    “The 1911 pistol remains the service pistol of choice in the eyes of those who understand the problem. Back when we audited the FBI academy in 1947, I was told that I ought not to use my pistol in their training program because it was not fair. Maybe the first thing one should demand of his sidearm is that it be unfair.” — Col. Jeff Cooper, GUNS & AMMO, January 2002

  3. #3
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Grennsboro NC
    Posts
    5,358

    Post imported post

    Thanks. I think the model you pointed out is probably the same one you use with the Kimber--Galco # SSS212B...

    So I have two questions for you, since you own and use it for competition.

    1) how secure is it (since it doesn't have any mechanical retention like a cam or a strap), and does the tension-adjusting screw stay in adjustment well? I have a Galco 2-mag leather carrier with a sikilar adjustment screw and it works GREAT...

    2) How dows it draw? It is as fast and smooth as a kydex/carbon fiber holster like a Fobus or Serpa?

    Personal assessments of actual owners in the field are FAR more important to me than the crap you read on the manufacturer's website. Although, it has been my experience that EVERYTHING on Galco's website is pretty much spot-on with regards to performance and construction quality...

    Thanks in advance.
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggression—and this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern Nevada, ,
    Posts
    721

    Post imported post

    If you want one holster for both IDPA and USPSA then you will have to get a IDPA legal holster (which will alsobe USPSA legal). Something like the Blade Tech injection molded belt holster or Uncle Mike's Kydex (if they make a 1911/Para model) will work fine.

    If you are worried about wearing the finish on your gun you can get a trigger-guard-only holster (Ghost, Limcat), which would be USPSA legal only. And avoid practicing and dry-firing, because handling your gun wears its finish.

  5. #5
    Campaign Veteran GlockMeisterG21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Pewaukee, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    637

    Post imported post

    Dreamer wrote:
    Thanks. I think the model you pointed out is probably the same one you use with the Kimber--Galco # SSS212B...

    So I have two questions for you, since you own and use it for competition.

    1) how secure is it (since it doesn't have any mechanical retention like a cam or a strap), and does the tension-adjusting screw stay in adjustment well? I have a Galco 2-mag leather carrier with a sikilar adjustment screw and it works GREAT...

    2) How dows it draw? It is as fast and smooth as a kydex/carbon fiber holster like a Fobus or Serpa?

    Personal assessments of actual owners in the field are FAR more important to me than the crap you read on the manufacturer's website. Although, it has been my experience that EVERYTHING on Galco's website is pretty much spot-on with regards to performance and construction quality...

    Thanks in advance.
    Sorry it took so long to get back to you, didn't see your reply.

    1)It's as secure as it can be with only one level of retention(tension screw). Is it going to fall out if I'm running or on the move? No. As to the screw I haven't adjusted it since I got it 3 months ago.

    2) The draw is not as fast as a serpa or similar kydex holster. This is simply because of the fact the leather is formed to the gun and creates friction when you draw. Kydex doesn't really "hug" the gun like molded leather does. That said I don't think it impacts the speed of my draw very much. One trick is when you get your holster put your gun in a ziploc bag and shove it in your holster. It will be tight but let it sit for a few days and it helps to break it in.

    I should also tell you that this is not just my IDPA holster but also my work holster. I work for a gun shop and wear it every day. I chose it because it looked extremely comfortable and I can take it on and off without drawing my gun. This is the most comfortable holster I've ever come across.
    “The 1911 pistol remains the service pistol of choice in the eyes of those who understand the problem. Back when we audited the FBI academy in 1947, I was told that I ought not to use my pistol in their training program because it was not fair. Maybe the first thing one should demand of his sidearm is that it be unfair.” — Col. Jeff Cooper, GUNS & AMMO, January 2002

  6. #6
    Regular Member shad0wfax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,067

    Post imported post

    Serpas are ok for competitions.

    You really can't go wrong with Bladetech holsters though. They make some of the best entry-level to full-blown professional competition level holsters around.

  7. #7
    Campaign Veteran gotm4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Woodbridge, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    89

    Post imported post

    Dreamer wrote:
    I'm thinking about getting back into "practical shooting" competition (IDPA/USPSA) and wondered if there were any other folks out there who did this, and what sort of holsters they would recommend for a double-stack full-size 1911 like my Para.

    I'll probably just use the Serpa, but I was thinking of getting a holster without mechanical retention specifically for competition. I'll be competing in either "stock" or "Limited" class, and will not have a comp or optics on my gun.

    I'm leaning toward leather, if for no other reason than it will probably wear on my finish less (with the constant holstering and unholstering of competition) than Kydex or other plastic-style units. I'm looking at something outside the waistband, preferably with a slight cant. On top of my list is the Galco Side Snap Scabbard, mainly because it's lined, and because it's a design I can get on and off without having to undo my belt...

    But I DO love the speed and smoothness of my Serpa, and am looking at the Uncle Mike's kydex holsters and Blackhawk non-Serpa holsters.

    So what do y'all think? I don't want to make a string of expensive experimental mistakes, and I'd appreciate any imput that other competitive shooters might have.

    Thanks.
    For competition take a look at the Comp-Tac or Blade-Tech holsters.
    The Galco Side Snap Scabbard is pretty nice too.
    I also like the Safariland custom fit.

    I'd be very careful with the Serpa holsters.
    I've seen two people accidently ND luckily not injured when drawing from them. These were with Glocks.
    What happens is when drawing at speed if you don't depress the button well enough and pull up on the handgun and it doesn't come out.
    Then they pull up on the handgun again while still pressing even more firmly on the button and as the handgun comes up their trigger finger makes it into the triggerguard and then boom!
    For retention holsters I like the Safariland ALS which is in the same price range as the Blackhawk Serpa. At work I wear a Safariland ALS with Glock 22 Gen 4.
    armorer & notary public for VA Arms Co FFL/SOT
    https://www.facebook.com/virginiaarmscompany

  8. #8
    Regular Member Damiansar-15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mercer Island, WA
    Posts
    197

    Post imported post

    I agree that Comp-tac/Bladetech are great choices, although I prefer Comp-tac for the fit (nice click when pistol is seated properly) and finish on pistols does not wear down like most Kydex holsters. I am not into jewelry guns, but do like the finishes to last, since rust can be an issue down in Houston. I have visited both companies in-person and they both have amazing staff with a customer-centric view on service/quality.

    I am also biased towards Comp-tac since they are made in Texas, but Bladetech offers thigh rigs, where as Comp-tac does not. For most shoot-scoot situations, Comp-tac rules in my view...

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Helena, Montana, USA
    Posts
    14

    Post imported post

    For USPSA I really prefer the dropped and off-set holsters from Blade-tech. I doubt they are IDPA legal though.

    If you only want 1 holster for 2 jobs, I'd say just get a Comp-Tac or Blade-Tech belt holster.

  10. #10
    Campaign Veteran gotm4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Woodbridge, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    89

    Post imported post

    Laramie wrote:
    For USPSA I really prefer the dropped and off-set holsters from Blade-tech. I doubt they are IDPA legal though.

    If you only want 1 holster for 2 jobs, I'd say just get a Comp-Tac or Blade-Tech belt holster.
    Dropped and offset is only legal for women in IDPA, due to body shape (hips).
    armorer & notary public for VA Arms Co FFL/SOT
    https://www.facebook.com/virginiaarmscompany

  11. #11
    Regular Member shad0wfax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,067

    Post imported post

    gotm4 wrote:
    Laramie wrote:
    For USPSA I really prefer the dropped and off-set holsters from Blade-tech. I doubt they are IDPA legal though.

    If you only want 1 holster for 2 jobs, I'd say just get a Comp-Tac or Blade-Tech belt holster.
    Dropped and offset is only legal for women in IDPA, due to body shape (hips).
    Yeah, my mom has to use a dropped offset holster, which is why I'm familiar with Blade-Tech stuff. Her trying to draw in a serpa is not even safe...

  12. #12
    Regular Member davegran's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Cassville Area -Twelve Miles From Anything, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,565

    Post imported post

    Dreamer wrote:
    I'm thinking about getting back into "practical shooting" competition (IDPA/USPSA) and wondered if there were any other folks out there who did this, and what sort of holsters they would recommend for a double-stack full-size 1911 like my Para.

    I'll probably just use the Serpa, but I was thinking of getting a holster without mechanical retention specifically for competition....

    But I DO love the speed and smoothness of my Serpa, and am looking at the Uncle Mike's kydex holsters and Blackhawk non-Serpa holsters.
    I shoot IDPA and I think the answer to your question depends on why you want to get back into practical shooting. Here are some that occur to me; you supply your own reasons:
    1. Want to develop your speed and skill with your carry weapon.
    2. Want to compete and win.
    3. Want to meet other shooters in a social sense.
    4. etc.
    And you may have some conditions that must be met:
    1. Want to preserve the finish on my weapon.
    2. Not concerned with finish wear.
    3. Want a good looking rig to show off my pistol.
    4. etc.
    My personal objectives are to develop my defensive shooting skills including gun handling and speed with accuracy, so I use my carry weapon and carry holster to develop that muscle memory. My holster happens to be Kydex, but I'm not concerned about finish wear as my 1911 seems to acquire patina and character from use.

    My suggestion is to start out with your Serpa and re-evaluate after three or four matches.

    Dave

    Dave
    45ACP-For when you care enough to send the very best-
    Fight for "Stand Your Ground " legislation!

    WI DA Gerald R. Fox:
    "These so-called 'public safety' laws only put decent law-abiding citizens at a dangerous disadvantage when it comes to their personal safety, and I for one am glad that this decades-long era of defective thinking on gun issues is over..."

    Remember: Don't make old People mad. We don't like being old in the first place, so it doesn't take much to piss us off.

  13. #13
    Regular Member Damiansar-15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mercer Island, WA
    Posts
    197

    Post imported post

    Laramie wrote:
    For USPSA I really prefer the dropped and off-set holsters from Blade-tech. I doubt they are IDPA legal though.

    If you only want 1 holster for 2 jobs, I'd say just get a Comp-Tac or Blade-Tech belt holster.
    I never understood why normal-sizedmen want a dropped/off-set rig for IDPA. If you are point shooting cowboy-style or using a race gun/rig, I get it, but in IDPA, one still has to draw and present the pistol to eye leave in order to get a sight picture and shoot accurately. A dropped holster increases the distance from the drawing position to shooting position, yes? I don't know about you, but I learned that increasing the distance between point A to B also increases time when all other elements remain the same... Distance also gets magnified when scenarios often require the shooter to start with their hands above their head. One's hand would have to travel further to get to a lower positioned holster and then return up to the sight picture...

  14. #14
    Regular Member davegran's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Cassville Area -Twelve Miles From Anything, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,565

    Post imported post

    Damiansar-15 wrote:
    Laramie wrote:
    For USPSA I really prefer the dropped and off-set holsters from Blade-tech. I doubt they are IDPA legal though.

    If you only want 1 holster for 2 jobs, I'd say just get a Comp-Tac or Blade-Tech belt holster.
    I never understood why normal-sizedmen want a dropped/off-set rig for IDPA. ....
    It would also present a problem when the course of fire stipulated that you draw from concealment... you'd need a pretty long garment to cover your weapon!

    Dave
    Dave
    45ACP-For when you care enough to send the very best-
    Fight for "Stand Your Ground " legislation!

    WI DA Gerald R. Fox:
    "These so-called 'public safety' laws only put decent law-abiding citizens at a dangerous disadvantage when it comes to their personal safety, and I for one am glad that this decades-long era of defective thinking on gun issues is over..."

    Remember: Don't make old People mad. We don't like being old in the first place, so it doesn't take much to piss us off.

  15. #15
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern Nevada, ,
    Posts
    721

    Post imported post

    I never understood why normal-sizedmen want a dropped/off-set rig for IDPA. If you are point shooting cowboy-style or using a race gun/rig, I get it, but in IDPA, one still has to draw and present the pistol to eye leave in order to get a sight picture and shoot accurately. A dropped holster increases the distance from the drawing position to shooting position, yes? I don't know about you, but I learned that increasing the distance between point A to B also increases time when all other elements remain the same... Distance also gets magnified when scenarios often require the shooter to start with their hands above their head. One's hand would have to travel further to get to a lower positioned holster and then return up to the sight picture...
    Dropped: Puts the handgun's grip in a position that it is faster and easier to grasp. A higher position causes a too-acute elbow bend and may require some torso lean.

    Offset: Extends the handgun's grip away from the body so that it is faster and easier to grasp. If the grip is too close against the body, the thumb tends to grab shirt and the torso requires some lean to create a gap.

    The D-O holster position decreases the distance from the initial hand position to the gun, which is a huge part of draw speed. The distance from the holster to eye level isn't so important. In order to make a fast and accurate first shot, it's necessary to slow the gun down when presenting itto the target so you can acquire the front sight (beyond point shooting distance).

    The proof is in the pudding. D-O holsters are capable of sub-second draws.

  16. #16
    Regular Member Damiansar-15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mercer Island, WA
    Posts
    197

    Post imported post

    The proof is in the pudding. D-O holsters are capable of sub-second draws.
    The D-O holster position decreases the distance from the initial hand position to the gun
    You have any empirical research to support pudding theory, because I believe sub-second draws are also possible with normal kydex holsters? I disagree that a D-O rig decreases distance, per my argument above.

    I supposean over weight shooter that is not limber might have an advantage based on your Dropped and Off-set value propositions. For me, my PACT timer confirms a properly placed kydex holster ona quality gunbelt is faster than some of the dropped rigs I've played with over the years. Might be that I am used to this placement, but I believe others in the industry would agree with me, e.g. Comp-tac.

    If it works for you great, I just don't think this type of rig is normally promoted by folks in theholster industryas a superior way to carry/present one's pistol.

  17. #17
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Olive Hill, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    186

    Post imported post

    For USPSA Single Stack Division, the holster must carry the firearm so that the entire front strap of the gun, down to the trigger guard is at or above the top of the belt. The trigger must be covered when holstered, and if it has any retaining devices such as straps they must be in place at the start signal.

    Gary

  18. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern Nevada, ,
    Posts
    721

    Post imported post

    Damiansar-15 wrote:
    You have any empirical research to support pudding theory, because I believe sub-second draws are also possible with normal kydex holsters?Â* I disagree that a D-O rig decreases distance, per my argument above.Â*

    ...

    If it works for you great, I just don't think this type of rig is normally promoted by folks in theÂ*holster industryÂ*as a superior way to carry/present one's pistol.
    I never said a "normal kydex" holster (whatever that is) or any other holster was not capable of a sub-second draw. By asking for empirical evidence (really? LOL) you are challenging my assertion that DOHs aren't capable of sub-second draws. So I'll turn it around: Do you have any empirical evidence they aren't? I'm sure Mr. Overlay has witnessed a few. (Hi, Gary.)

    I wasn't addressing the industry's marketing efforts for promoting holsters. I was addressing your lack of understanding of why some people desire such holsters for competition.

  19. #19
    Regular Member Damiansar-15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Mercer Island, WA
    Posts
    197

    Post imported post

    I am not challenging you that a drop/kicked out holster is incapable of sub-second draws (some shooters can do this with leg holsters, as well), I am arguing that for normal men, there is not an advantage to this type of rig for daily carry, IDPA, etc... and potentially causes a disadvantage of speed, agility, concealment, etc... Use a tape measure to prove my point on the distance.
    Per my previous post, I get it that a pear-shaped men with a limited range of motion might have a faster draw with droped/kick-out holster; you win on that point. Although, I would also suspect, that most of the top schools/teachers in the industry, e.g. Clint Smith, John Farnam, etc... would still prefer holsters for defensive carry/shooting to not be a dropped version, and would encourage students to gain flexibility, lose weight, etc... in order to achieve a proper draw and presentation...

  20. #20
    Campaign Veteran joeamt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA
    Posts
    211

    Post imported post

    Dreamer wrote:
    I'm thinking about getting back into "practical shooting" competition (IDPA/USPSA) and wondered if there were any other folks out there who did this, and what sort of holsters they would recommend for a double-stack full-size 1911 like my Para.

    I'll probably just use the Serpa, but I was thinking of getting a holster without mechanical retention specifically for competition. I'll be competing in either "stock" or "Limited" class, and will not have a comp or optics on my gun.

    I'm leaning toward leather, if for no other reason than it will probably wear on my finish less (with the constant holstering and unholstering of competition) than Kydex or other plastic-style units. I'm looking at something outside the waistband, preferably with a slight cant. On top of my list is the Galco Side Snap Scabbard, mainly because it's lined, and because it's a design I can get on and off without having to undo my belt...

    But I DO love the speed and smoothness of my Serpa, and am looking at the Uncle Mike's kydex holsters and Blackhawk non-Serpa holsters.

    So what do y'all think? I don't want to make a string of expensive experimental mistakes, and I'd appreciate any imput that other competitive shooters might have.

    Thanks.
    I have this: http://www.rescomp.co.za/pWSMIIMODSP...-Specific.aspx



    I love it! It firmly retains my 1911 untill I decide to draw it. The best part: NO HOLSTER WEAR. Another plus: customizable to where you want it to hang and how.

  21. #21
    Regular Member shad0wfax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1,067

    Post imported post

    joeamt wrote:
    I have this: http://www.rescomp.co.za/pWSMIIMODSP...-Specific.aspx

    I love it! It firmly retains my 1911 untill I decide to draw it. The best part: NO HOLSTER WEAR. Another plus: customizable to where you want it to hang and how.
    Yeah, those are the fancy full-blown race-holsters I alluded to earlier. I honestly don't think very many of us are consistent enough to take advantage of the 0.01 to 0.10 second difference those offer over a serpa.

    A smooth, consistent, efficient draw that you have repeated tens of thousands of times with a perfect sight picture and dry fire from a $20 holster will allow you to out-score and out-pace 99.9% of your competition.

    When you get to the professional shooter competition level, a $200 race-holster might help give you that 0.01 second edge you need to squeak a win on a clean vs. clean stage shoot-off.

    The other thing you have to keep in mind is that the vast majority of us who are involved in competitive shooting are doing it to refine our skills for self-defense purposes. If that's the case for you, practice what you carry and carry what you practice. Since I have no intention of ever open-carrying an open-front race-holster I will never practice or compete with one.

    Instead, I practice and compete with my Serpa, which is what I carry on the street.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •