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Thread: Trigger question?

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    I've been looking for a new carry weapon. I tried a few Sigs, S&Ws and a Glock or two. I've found that the trigger pull is much longer than, my 1911.

    After chatting with an acquaintance, about the trigger pull issue, he suggested that if I get a trigger job or have a carry weapon with a short, light trigger pull I could run into trouble if I were to use the weapon. He suggested that I could be sued if the trigger pull was too short or light. Has anyone ever heard of this issue?

    Thanks.

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    My opinion onlyand you know what that is worth. It is not wise to have a light trigger on a defensive gun, as it can result in a shot being fired due to excitement, nerves, adrenalin etc. Save the light trigger for your target gun.

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    This is why I actually love the DA/SA trigger of the Sigs.

    The first pull is a bit rough. Not something you are going to do by accident for certain. But if need be, every shot after that is crisp and light.

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    Trigger Dr wrote:
    My opinion onlyand you know what that is worth. It is not wise to have a light trigger on a defensive gun, as it can result in a shot being fired due to excitement, nerves, adrenalin etc. Save the light trigger for your target gun.
    Agreed, If my firearm goes off I know that's what I wanted.

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    Also, it is NOT a good idea to have a trigger over travel stop installed on your defensive gun. Why? a small but critical slip in adjustment could cause the trigger to STOP before releasing the sear. probability of that happening , Who knows, but who wants to be the one to find out.

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    How spoiled you are...



    Starting off with a 1911 trigger will spoil you as you can see.

    You can certainly lighten and smooth out your trigger on a semi DA/SA (double action/single action) but taking it to the extremes of sub 4 pound triggers is a bit unwise for self defense.

    Certainly for revolvers depending on what you plan on using it for (competition or just a ligher "hair trigger") is up to you.

    Now for semi's for self defense - as mentioned it can become problematic (unless you practice religiously with it) because the amount of force is so slight and when you are pumping with fear and adrenaline you may have a ND (negligent discharge)- causing more problems for you as for being reckless.

    Really any modifications will be scrutinized by the prosecutor to be used against you in a shooting scenario if things go badly (from ammo choice to "trigger job").



    So, why not stay with the 1911 SA (single action)? If you like the trigger?

    If you decide to continue with a SA/DA semi, like any of the guns you are looking at then you need to practice and become comfortable with the trigger for that gun. Sure you can have it smoothed out but making it "too light" is not the way to go.

    For a good 1911 a trigger pull of anywhere between 4.5 - 5 pounds is good.

    For a semi DA will range about 9 - 15 pounds.

    For a semi SA will range about 5 - 8 pounds.



    Typically I find it will literally take you about 500 - 1000 live firerounds to get used to a trigger (when you switch from a 1911 to a semi DA).

    This means lots of practice. Dry fire exercises are good if you know what you doing. Do a google search to find some dry fire exercises and go at it.
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    With a Glock, whatever you do don't get the 3.5 lb connector. I tried it, it gave me the only AD's I've ever had (all went downrange though). The Glock trigger already has about 1 or 1.5 lbs pressure on the travel, so the difference between travel and breakover is harder to predict.

    Best way to go with a Glock is use the standard 5lb connector, but have it polished by one of the Glock vendors at the gun shows. That lightens the breakover slightly and smooths it considerable, but also leaves it nice and crisp and easy to tell when it's coming.

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    David.Car wrote:
    This is why I actually love the DA/SA trigger of the Sigs.

    The first pull is a bit rough. Not something you are going to do by accident for certain. But if need be, every shot after that is crisp and light.
    +1

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    FMCDH wrote:
    David.Car wrote:
    This is why I actually love the DA/SA trigger of the Sigs.

    The first pull is a bit rough. Not something you are going to do by accident for certain. But if need be, every shot after that is crisp and light.
    +1
    +1
    Live Free or Die!

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    What you are far more likely to get sued or criminally charged over is whether you shot when you shouldn't have. Number one rule here is TRAINING. Keep your booger-hook off the bang switch until you WANT it to go boom. Negligent discharges (ND) are the result of fingers being where they should not have been. Accidental discharges (AD) are for those who do an ND but don't wish to accept the responsibility for it or admit to negligence.

    If it is a legitimate shoot, it doesn't matter what your trigger pull was, what caliber your gun was, or whether you load your own ammo or not.

    These concerns come up from time to time, but I have yet to see any such fears supported by actual cases where a shooting was determined to be justified, but then other issues caused problems. The cases that have been offered have included such issues only in addition to questions on the legitimacy of the shoot itself.

    Try a variety of guns, find one you shoot well and is comfortable to you, then practice, practice, practice.

    Maintain the functional integrity of the gun for it's reliability. If you want a super sweet uber trigger, save it for your range gun. That is not to say don't do any work on a trigger, but make sure the work that is done doesn't compromise it's reliability.

    Swapping Glock connectors and trigger springs or doing a light polish is one thing. Rounding edges and going to reduced power firing pin springs is another.



    kschmadeka wrote:
    With a Glock, whatever you do don't get the 3.5 lb connector. I tried it, it gave me the only AD's I've ever had (all went downrange though). The Glock trigger already has about 1 or 1.5 lbs pressure on the travel, so the difference between travel and breakover is harder to predict.

    Best way to go with a Glock is use the standard 5lb connector, but have it polished by one of the Glock vendors at the gun shows. That lightens the breakover slightly and smooths it considerable, but also leaves it nice and crisp and easy to tell when it's coming.
    Or try the 3.5lb connector, learn trigger control, and see if you like it.

    My favorite trigger in the Glock is a polished 3.5 connector with a New York 1 trigger spring, minus the metal spring on the NY1. Gives a fantastic trigger, not quite as mushy on the take up, but still a nice light let off and a fantastic reset.

    FWIW, I have 3.5lb connectors in all my Glocks and have never had an ND (or AD if you prefer). Just because one person didn't like it or couldn't master it doesn't mean you (or anyone else) should not even consider it. Believe it or not, there are some people who can do things others find difficult or are unwilling to learn.

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    Regular Member FMCDH's Avatar
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    911Boss wrote:
    What you are far more likely to get sued or criminally charged over is whether you shot when you shouldn't have. Number one rule here is TRAINING. Keep your booger-hook off the bang switch until you WANT it to go boom. Negligent discharges (ND) are the result of fingers being where they should not have been. Accidental discharges (AD) are for those who do an ND but don't wish to accept the responsibility for it or admit to negligence.
    And +1000 on this....couldn't agree more.

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    I just picked up an FNP45. It's a DA/SA, real smooth trigger pulls. DA is 9-10lbs, SA is around 4-5lbs. I don't have a measure, just guestimating.

    Links to pictures and models as follows. They chamber it for a lot of popular calibers.

    http://www.fnhusa.com/le/products/fi...asp?gid=FNG001
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself." -John Stuart Mill

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    Regular Member amlevin's Avatar
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    911Boss wrote:
    If it is a legitimate shoot, it doesn't matter what your trigger pull was, what caliber your gun was, or whether you load your own ammo or not.
    Where have I heard that statement before?

    Oh, wait, I think it is the answer to just about any question regarding guns, ammo, and Self Defense Scenarios. Too bad that most don't believe the first 9 words and want to make it complicated.
    "If I shoot all the ammo I am carrying I either won't need anymore or more won't help"

    "If you refuse to stand up for others now, who will stand up for you when your time comes?"

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