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Thread: Register‑Guard (Eugene, OR) - Open carry legal, but rare

  1. #1
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    http://www.registerguard.com/csp/cms...gon-owners.csp

    March 10, 2010

    Byline: Greg Bolt



    SNIP



    * A movement encouraging gun owners to wear them in public isn't taking hold here, although it's perfectly legal



    A growing movement that has inspired some gun owners in other states to start openly wearing their sidearms in public doesn't appear to have gained much steam in Oregon or Lane County, but some people may be surprised to learn that Oregon and local laws don't prohibit it.



    . . .



    While Oregon's firearms laws can be somewhat arcane and difficult to follow, the state is considered a "traditional open‑carry state," according to the Web site opencarry.org, which is a clearinghouse for the movement. That means the state doesn't flatly prohibit people from carrying guns openly, although it does impose some limits and allows cities and counties some latitude to pass their own ordinances restricting the practice.



    For example, state law prohibits carrying a loaded or unloaded firearm in a public building unless a person has a concealed handgun permit. And even with such a permit, weapons are not allowed in a school, state courthouses or any federal building.



    Also, state statutes do allow cities and counties to impose ordinances that prohibit or restrict the possession of loaded firearms in public places. About a half‑dozen cities have done that, including Portland, Beaverton, Tigard, Oregon City, Salem and Independence, according to opencarry.org.



    But those laws cannot bar people from carrying unloaded firearms in public. Nor do they apply to people who hold a concealed handgun permit. In fact, Starrett said, people with a permit to carry a concealed handgun also can carry a loaded one openly in cities that prohibit open carrying by those without a permit.



    That's because state law exempts people with such permits from any restrictions imposed by local governments. Starrett said that's a nuance that isn't well understood, even by police officers, who at times have incorrectly ordered gun owners to unload or put away their handguns.



    But most communities in Oregon have no local laws that restrict or prohibit openly carrying a handgun in public places, beyond the rules set by the state. Eugene, Springfield and Lane County are among those with no local restrictions.



    Private property owners -- including retailers such as Starbucks -- are free to set their own restrictions on the display of weaponry on their premises, just as they can require customers or visitors to wear a shirt or shoes or behave in a civilized manner.



    Eugene Police Department spokeswoman Melinda Kletzok said although it's unusual, police do get occasional reports of someone carrying a gun in public or questions from people who want to know if it's legal.



    About all police can do, she said, is caution people that they may cause undue alarm if they elect to pack a handgun openly.



    "That's their right to do so if they choose; there's no city law prohibiting it," Kletzok said



    . . .



    "There are a group of people who believe strongly that open carry is a positive movement on a number of levels," Starrett said. "Primarily, it's just getting people accustomed to the idea that a civilian with a firearm isn't necessarily dangerous or crazy or something like that."



    Open‑carry advocate Gray Peterson sees that as one of the principles of the movement. Peterson, who does research for opencarry.org, is a former Oregon resident who now lives in Washington but still has a concealed handgun permit in Oregon.



    Peterson said carrying a gun openly "shows us as not these dangerous people that the Brady campaign and their allies and what some parts of the movie industry portray gun owners to be," he said in an e‑mail that referred to the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a gun control advocacy group.



    He also said a gun on the hip can help break down stereotypes about gun owners. Peterson said he is a gay man and a political progressive, and that by being an open‑carry supporter he can start people thinking about civil liberties beyond the Second Amendment.



    . . .




  2. #2
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    I just posted a link to this myself as I had a friend who knows I OC brought me a hardcopy of the Guard today. I have been carrying 100% of the time I legally can in Lane County for over a year now but guess I have to wear a strobe light to get some attention! (disclaimer: I have not been actively trying to attract attention, but am willing to answer questions from curious citizens, (ianal))

    I had one t.v. reporter contact me last year in connection to an open carry story that apparently never made it to production, she never replied to my reply. This Greg Bolt didn't make a very good attempt to contact any OCers in Oregon since my 'name' is all over this site and I walk around with my nickel plated .38 and hat that says RevJimII with Oregon Open Carry on it.. (Mike, let me know if I crossed any lines borrowing the term open carry!)

    I am not sure if this is good or bad that I haven't had more exposure.. hmm..






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    Mike wrote:
    While Oregon's firearms laws can be somewhat arcane and difficult to follow, ...
    For example, state law prohibits carrying a loaded or unloaded firearm in a public building unless a person has a concealed handgun permit. And even with such a permit, weapons are not allowed in a school, state courthouses or any federal building.


    WOW, I've been misreading the law apparently. I wasn't aware that our laws were arcane and difficult to follow!!!

    Then again, I wasn't aware that I couldn't carry on school property with a CHL.

    OW WAIT..... the "journalist" is WRONG. Imagine that? Interesting that Starbucks made it into the story, though at least he didn't attack them.
    "The Second Amendment speaks nothing to an unfettered Right". (Post # 100)
    "Restrictions are not infringements. Bans are infringements.--if it reaches beyond Reasonable bans". (Post # 103)
    Beretta92FSLady
    http://forum.opencarry.org/forums/sh...ons-Bill/page5

    Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, nothing in any of my posts should be considered legal advice. If you need legal advice, consult a reputable attorney, not an internet forum.

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    I was offended at being called idiotic, extremist and a troublemaker.

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    Mike wrote:
    For example, state law prohibits carrying a loaded or unloaded firearm in a public building unless a person has a concealed handgun permit. And even with such a permit, weapons are not allowed in a school, state courthouses or any federal building.



    Aren't reporters supposed to actually check their facts before reporting on them? With a CHL, public schools are not off limits. Being spotted carrying on the grounds of a public school would most certainly ruin your day as the school is locked down and the SWAT team shows up, but still, it is perfectly legal.

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