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Thread: A little off topic...Utah CCW permit

  1. #1
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    It is only taking about 40 days to get the Utah CCW permit...:celebrate

  2. #2
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    Is anything going on in NV to try to get reciprocity with Utah back? That sucks for everybody.

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    As i hear it, until they bring there standards up to meet ours, NO
    so said sheriff Galespy at one of his meetings with the public...
    But Nevada does have a non resident permit for about $125/ classes and all and it takes about two weeks to get it ..

  4. #4
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    doninvegas wrote:
    As i hear it, until they bring there standards up to meet ours, NO
    so said sheriff Galespy at one of his meetings with the public...
    But Nevada does have a non resident permit for about $125/ classes and all and it takes about two weeks to get it ..
    If you read the LAW, Utah requirements do meet Nevada requirements. The problem is that Nevada law gives excessive latitude to the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association to interpret the law and formulate the rules.

    My bet is that the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs decided that they were losing too much money to out of state permits. It is impossible to know for sure because their meetings are not subject to the open meetings laws because the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association is not a government agency.

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    rpyne wrote:
    doninvegas wrote:
    As i hear it, until they bring there standards up to meet ours, NO
    so said sheriff Galespy at one of his meetings with the public...
    But Nevada does have a non resident permit for about $125/ classes and all and it takes about two weeks to get it ..
    If you read the LAW, Utah requirements do meet Nevada requirements. The problem is that Nevada law gives excessive latitude to the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association to interpret the law and formulate the rules.

    My bet is that the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs decided that they were losing too much money to out of state permits. It is impossible to know for sure because their meetings are not subject to the open meetings laws because the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association is not a government agency.
    I have gone to the last two" Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association meetings" and this was discussed in length......but you are prob right...$$$ drives the local law.....

  6. #6
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    rpyne wrote:
    doninvegas wrote:
    As i hear it, until they bring there standards up to meet ours, NO
    so said sheriff Galespy at one of his meetings with the public...
    But Nevada does have a non resident permit for about $125/ classes and all and it takes about two weeks to get it ..
    If you read the LAW, Utah requirements do meet Nevada requirements. The problem is that Nevada law gives excessive latitude to the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association to interpret the law and formulate the rules.

    My bet is that the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs decided that they were losing too much money to out of state permits. It is impossible to know for sure because their meetings are not subject to the open meetings laws because the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association is not a government agency.
    It was said that Utah law does not require shooting quals; hence "not substantially similar" to Nevada law in the opinion of the NSCA.

  7. #7
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    varminter22 wrote:
    rpyne wrote:
    doninvegas wrote:
    As i hear it, until they bring there standards up to meet ours, NO
    so said sheriff Galespy at one of his meetings with the public...
    But Nevada does have a non resident permit for about $125/ classes and all and it takes about two weeks to get it ..
    If you read the LAW, Utah requirements do meet Nevada requirements. The problem is that Nevada law gives excessive latitude to the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association to interpret the law and formulate the rules.

    My bet is that the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs decided that they were losing too much money to out of state permits. It is impossible to know for sure because their meetings are not subject to the open meetings laws because the Sheriffs and Police Chiefs Association is not a government agency.
    It was said that Utah law does not require shooting quals; hence "not substantially similar" to Nevada law in the opinion of the NSCA.
    Nevada LAW does not require shooting qualification either, it only requires familiarity with the type of firearm to be carried, same as Utah law. It is the Sheriffs and Chiefs Association that has interpreted the law to require range qualification.


    NRS 202.3657 Application for permit; eligibility; denial or revocation of permit.
    (2)(c) Demonstrates competence with revolvers, each specific semiautomatic firearm to which the application pertains, or revolvers and each such semiautomatic firearm, as applicable, by presenting a certificate or other documentation to the sheriff which shows that the applicant:
    (1) Successfully completed a course in firearm safety approved by a sheriff in this State; or
    (2) Successfully completed a course in firearm safety offered by a federal, state or local law enforcement agency, community college, university or national organization that certifies instructors in firearm safety.
    Such a course must include instruction in the use of revolvers, each semiautomatic firearm to which the application pertains, or revolvers and each such semiautomatic firearm and in the laws of this State relating to the use of a firearm. A sheriff may not approve a course in firearm safety pursuant to subparagraph (1) unless the sheriff determines that the course meets any standards that are established by the Nevada Sheriffs’ and Chiefs’ Association or, if the Nevada Sheriffs’ and Chiefs’ Association ceases to exist, its legal successor.
    UCA 53-5-704. Division duties -- Permit to carry concealed firearm -- Certification for concealed firearms instructor -- Requirements for issuance -- Violation -- Denial, suspension, or revocation -- Appeal procedure.

    (7) (a) General familiarity with the types of firearms to be concealed includes training in:
    (i) the safe loading, unloading, storage, and carrying of the types of firearms to be concealed; and
    (ii) current laws defining lawful use of a firearm by a private citizen, including lawful self-defense, use of force by a private citizen, including use of deadly force, transportation, and concealment.
    (b) Evidence of general familiarity with the types of firearms to be concealed may be satisfied by one of the following:
    (i) completion of a course of instruction conducted by a national, state, or local firearms training organization approved by the division;
    (ii) certification of general familiarity by a person who has been certified by the division, which may include a law enforcement officer, military or civilian firearms instructor, or hunter safety instructor; or
    (iii) equivalent experience with a firearm through participation in an organized shooting competition, law enforcement, or military service.
    (c) Instruction taken by a student under Subsection (7)(b) shall be in person and not through electronic means.

  8. #8
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    Roger that. I should have been more specific as I'm well aware of the NRS. It boils down to the NSCA's wide latitude in interpreting 'demonstrate competence' and formulating regulations; I too have always opined the same.

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