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Thread: biggest firearm lawforcement would ever use?

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    what is the largest caliber firearm that law enforcement would/could ever use?

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    A: Whatever they want. Even the .50 Caliber Barrett

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    dropped bombs on some drug house in chicago some years back didn't they?

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    Didn't they use tanks at Waco?

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    The US Coast Guard (which is NOT under the DOD in peacetime--they are under the DOT) uses .50 BMG weapons for drug interdictions.

    The New York City Police Department and the Pittsburgh PA Police have both adopted the Barrett .50 sniper rifles as well for use from helicopters, and in hostage situations.

    http://wcbstv.com/topstories/Barrett....2.229649.html

    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09287/1005309-455.stm

    It's interesting that .50 cal rifles were made illegal for citizens to own in NY by the General Assembly in 2005...

    And Pittsburgh Police are becoming one of the most high-tech LEA's in the country. Not only do they have Barretts, but they have UAVs for surveillance...

    The .50 BMG is illegal for private citizen ownership in CA, MA, NY, HI and IL. However, in all those states, LEA get a pass on the ban, and Barretts are becoming increasingly popular for law enforcement, under the justification of using them in "hostage situations" and disabling the ever-present threat of some nutcase stealing a bulldozer or Abrams tank and running amok...

    I don't know if LEA's own or use anything bigger than a .50 BMG. Somehow, I doubt they could easily justify anything bigger. Even in some of the "sheeple states" it would be hard for LEA's to justify actual artillery, but I'm sure that the police in NY and CA would LOVE to get their hands on some Stingers, LAWs, or AGM-114 Hellfires to hang on their helicopters...
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    McX wrote:
    dropped bombs on some drug house in chicago some years back didn't they?
    Those were incendiary devices, not explosives. They set the houses on fire...
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    I'm pretty sure FBI HRT has access to just about whatever they want.

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    Weapons: The FBI to Purchase The Anzio Mag-Fed 20mm Rifle google_protectAndRun("ads_core.google_render_ad", google_handleError, google_render_ad); Thanks to Matt for sending me this one. Wow, what a weapon! This is the kind of rifle marine contractors could use on a boat. That, along with theNeopupthat Eeben introduced us to, and now we are talking about a pretty lethal capability. (the Neopup uses 20 mm x 42)

    What makes20 mm x 102 Vulcanround stand out, is that it can deliver a round at distance, and then the explosive charge is what provides the knock down power and destruction (chemical energy). The .50 cal. is mostly dependent on the kinetic force of the bullet to do all of that. So that thing needs velocity to knock stuff down. (kinetic energy) Although there are explosive tipped .50 cal rounds out there, I don’t think there is anything with the kind of energy that the 20 mm Vulcan can produce. Not to mention all of the interesting rounds that come in 20 mm.
    I guess you could always go bigger, but the idea here is something you can transport easily that could be managed by a small team. This rifle falls under that category in my opinion.
    Here are the particulars of the contract, and I have no idea what the FBI plans on doing with these things. They are probably using them for testing purposes, and also for having some kind of niche capability. This would be a fantastic tool for taking out a generator at distance, or maybe taking out a vehicle or boat at distance. It is definitely anti-material if you know what I mean.
    The paint schemes might be an indicator of what they have planned. The Navy NWV digital pattern could mean they want a gun for maritime purposes? Who knows, and maybe someone from the FBI can give us the low down? Check out thevideo of this beast in actionas well. -Matt
    ———————————————— ————–

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) intends to award a non-competitive, sole source purchase order to Anzio Ironworks Corporation, 1905 16th Street N, St. Petersburg, FL 33704 for two (2) Magfed 20mm Rifles and accessories in accordance with FAR 6.302-1, only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements.
    The FBI intends to procure the following items:
    Magfed 20mm Rifle with Belgian Camo Overcoat finish. Includes bipod, brake, handguard, free floated barrel and case (Qty: 1 each)
    Magfed 20mm Rifle with Navy NWV Camo Duracoat finish. Includes bipod, brake, handguard, free floated barrel and case (Qty: 1 each)
    Non-firing bolt assemblies (Qty: 2 each)
    Extra magazines (Qty: 4 each)
    Suppressors in 20mm (Qty: 2 each)
    FBO Solicitationhere.
    ———————————————— —————


    Bullet comparison of the .223 Rem, .338 Lapua, 50BMG and 20 mm Vulcan.
    Features:
    • 49” match grade fluted barrel
    • Heavy duty clam-shell brake
    • Detachable box magazine
    • Available in 14.5mm, 20mm, and new Anzio 20-50 calibers
    • Titanium firing pin
    • 5000 yard maximum range
    • Optional weights and configurations
    • Huge amounts of fun
    • Low recoil
    Training ammo $9.50 each Tracer ammo $15 each SOLD OUT SOLD OUT + shipping (minimum order required), Call for AP pricing - only limited quantities remaining!
    Includes:
    • Quick change – Take-down barrel
    • Fluted, hand lapped match barrel
    • Oversized, high efficiency brake
    • One detachable 3-round magazines
    • Four massive locking lugs
    • Heavy duty bipod
    • Fully adjustable rear monopod
    • 40 minute inclined scope rail
    • Duracoat finish of your choice
    • Blue-printed bolt & action
    • Percussion primed configuration
    • Massive bolt handle for easy loading & extraction
    • Super smooth action
    Optional:
    • Multi- caliber kit 14.5mm and 20mm
    • Pintle mount
    • Available in 59lbs to 130lbs & up
    • Electric primed upgrade
    • 50BMG “Rail gun” conversion kit
    • Yes, single shot version available for less
    • You think it up – We’ll build it
    • Optional handguard, freefloated barrel and adjustable bipod model $13,000.00
    • Suppressor available for $3200
    Anzio Iron Works Websitehere.
    http://youtu.be/xWgVGu3OR4U AACFI, Wisconsin / Minnesota Carry Certified. Action Pistol & Advanced Action pistol concepts + Urban Carbine course. When the entitlement Zombies begin looting, pillaging, raping, burning & killing..remember HEAD SHOTS it's the only way to kill a Zombie. Stockpile food & water now.

    Please support your local,county, state & Federal Law enforcement agencies, right ???

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    West Springfield, MA Police Department has 2 grenade launchers.

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    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    eye95 wrote:
    Didn't they use tanks at Waco?
    Yes and no. The infamous "fire starter tank" was actually a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, which is tecnhically NOT a tank. It is an Armored Personnel Carrier, but it can be equipped with various guns for firing anything from the "Ferret" rounds used at Waco (which are used to launch projectiles that disperse teargas and other chemical agents.), to heavy and light machine guns (.50 cal and 7.62mm). It's main armament is the M242 25mm chain gun, which is used primarily for suppressive fire, but can be loaded with incendiary rounds or DU/Tungsten armor-piercing rounds and used as a "tank killer".

    After the fire started, the FBI encircled the permiter of the building with several Abrams M1A1 Main Battle Tanks that they had "procured" from the Texas National Guard under the "Drug Interdiction Act", and used this "chain of custody" to skirt the Posse Comitatus act, because technically they were not using the "Federal Military". But the Abrams' were not used in offensive operations, just to establish a perimeter to prevent escape and provide cover for federal agents in case the Davidians decided to return fire from inside their burning buildings. Once the fire burned out, they used National Guard earth-moving equipment (bulldozers and graders) to level the rubble, and destroy the reinforced concrete substructures before the site could be examined by the Texas Fire Marshall, FBI investigators or the media.
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    Dreamer wrote:
    Once the fire burned out, they used National Guard earth-moving equipment (bulldozers and graders) to level the rubble, and destroy the reinforced concrete substructures before the site could be examined by the Texas Fire Marshall, FBI investigators or the media.
    Hmmm..... Not to sound paranoid, but that sounds kinda fishy... I wonder what the purpose was in that? What could they possibly have been trying to hide?
    Carry on!

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    Everyone should get a copy of this book and read it. It's published by the CATO institute, one of the biggest "think tanks" in the US.

    http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=6476

    Scary stuff, Maynard...


    And this is the sort of thing they do with their toys:

    http://www.columbiatribune.com/news/...-look-at-swat/

    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    Now THAT is the most powerful weapon anyone could possibly OC: The think tank.

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    So citizens are losing their rights because SWAT is conducting a lot of raids? Makes a boat load of sense to me..


    *Sarcasm off*

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    Aaron1124 wrote:
    So citizens are losing their rights because SWAT is conducting a lot of raids? Makes a boat load of sense to me..


    *Sarcasm off*
    The point this report is making is that these people could be arrested--at much lower cost to the taxpayer, much less disruption to the communities, and with much more safety to the officers, bystanders, and the accused, if they just arrested people the way police used to--out in the open, when they were going about their normal daily routine--rather than bringing in a dozen or so amped-up, heavily-armed ex SF recruits who have been trained to take delight in violence, mayhem, and gross displays of dominance and power.

    He is saying that SWAT raids are fiscally wasteful, operationally dangerous, hurtful to community morale and serve no purpose other than to present good photo ops and create an atmosphere of fear and intimidation in the communities.

    And he's right.

    I don't know what's more scary--that this "us-vs-them" attitude among LEAs is becoming the "status quo", or that the People don't seem to be appalled, outraged, and disgusted by these tactics.

    If you read this report (you don't have to buy it--any good library can get it for you if they don't already have it) you'll see that a shameful number of these aggressive raids are carried out against people who were mi-identified, or the cops got the address wrong, or the person was flat-out set up by an informant or bad police work.

    And when they DO get the wrong house and trash it and rough up the occupants, the courts RARELY rule that the police did nothing wrong, and refuse to award damages to the victims.

    Here's how they do things in YOUR home state of WA:

    Leticia Lopez

    October 15, 2002—WA

    Police storm Lopez's home and handcuff her in front of her 8-year-old son after getting a tip from some homebuyers who saw a propane burner, cooking pot, and other items in the woman's backyard they said suggested a methamphetamine operation.
    After police handcuff and detain Lopez, they discover that the burner and pot were leftover from a steak cookout a few days earlier, and the chemicals the officers and informants had mistaken for meth ingrediants were paint solvents.
    After the raid, Lopez begins to have anxiety and panic attacks, and is admitted to a hospital for treatment.

    The Elseas

    March 15, 1999—WA

    In March 1999, Linda Elsea looks out her window to find a team of SWAT soldiers armed with assault weapons barreling up her driveway. She is handcuffed, body cavity searched, and taken to the police station.
    Dick and Linda Elsea began smoking marijuana after the passage of Initiative 692, a Washington state measure authorizing the use of cannabis for medical purposes. The marijuana helped treat Dick's apnea and Linda's severe muscle pain, caused by fibromylagia, until police raided their home based on a tip.
    Source:
    Gordy Holt, "Suit seeks equal access to medicinal pot," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 8, 1999, p. B1.

    Dep. John Bananola

    October 16, 1995—WA

    On October 16, 1995, police raid the home of 24-year old Brian Eggleston's parents. Eggleston, a small-time marijuana dealer, is in the home at the time, as are his parents. As police force entry, Eggelston says he thought they were intruders there to harm his parents. He comes out of the bedroom firing, and shoots and kills Dep. Bananola. Eggleston himself is shot in the chest, knee, abdomen and groin.
    Police find a small amount of marijuana, and later charge Eggleston with selling the drug to an informant.
    Prosecutors made three attempts to convict Eggleston of first-degree murder, which could have resulted in the death penalty. On the third try, a jury found Eggleston guilty of second-degree murder. He's serving a 39-year sentence.
    Sources:
    Jack Hopkins, "Anger and tears as Eggleston gets 29 more years," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, July 3, 1998.
    "Conviction upheld, but sentence vacated in sheriff deputy's death," Associated Press, September 1, 2005.

    Shawn Cottrell

    March 31, 1994—WA

    On March 31, 1994, a SWAT team in Federal Way, Washington conducts a drug raid on suspect Joel Duncan. Duncan share an apartment with three roommates, including 19-year-old Shawn Cottrell.
    As police force entry by breaking down the door at around 10:30 pm, Cottrell emerges, and according to police, he's holding a gun (Cottrell's family would later establish that Cottrell's fingerprints weren't found on the gun). A police officer fires two bursts from his semi-automatic weapon, hitting the Cottrell five times, and killing him. Cottrell was not the subject of the raid, and not suspected of a crime. Duncan was unhurt in the raid, and later charged and convicted of drug crimes.
    Though police insisted that they knocked and clearly announced themselves before the raid, occupants of the apartment, neighbors, and at least one police officer outside the building heard no announcement.
    Source:
    Horvath v. King County Police Dep't, 2001 Wash. App. LEXIS 1603 (Wash. Ct. App. 2001)

    Gracia Figueroa and children

    November 9, 1992—WA

    In December 1992, DEA agents raid the Pasco, Washington home of Gracia Figueroa. According to Figueroa, agents break down her door, pull her daughters from their beds, then hold the family at gunpoint while agents ransack their home. They found no drugs.
    The DEA said the raid was conducted after Figueroa's ex-husband was arrested on drug charges the day before -- in Wisconsin.
    Source:
    "Drug raid settlement not enough for mom," Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 18, 1992.

    The Glover Family

    May 22, 1992—WA

    In May 1992, police in King County, Washington conduct a no-knock raid with cameras from the television show Cops in tow.
    Police break open the door of the Glover family and their four children. They put a gun to Floyd Glover's head and order him to the floor. Theresa Glover is handcuffed at gunpoint. Despite being half-dressed, and with the cameras still rolling, police at first refuse to let her cover up. Other officers then storm the children's bedroom, screaming, "Everyone on the floor!"
    Police had targeted the wrong home.
    Cops would later decide not to air the raid. The same police department had conducted two other "wrong door" raids in the previous year.
    Source:
    "Drug raid blunder uncovers bottom line," Herald Sun, May 25, 1992.

    Robin Pratt

    March 24, 1992—WA

    In March 1992, police in Everett, Washington storm the home of Robin Pratt on a no-knock warrant. They are looking for her husband, who would later be released when the allegations in the warrant turned out to be false.
    Though police had a key to the apartment, they instead choose to throw a 50-pound battering ram through the apartment's sliding-glass door. Glass shards land inches away from the couple's six-year-old daughter and five-year-old niece. One officer encounters Robin Pratt on the way to her bedroom. Hearing other SWAT team members yell "Get down!" Pratt falls to her knees. She then raises her head briefly to say, "Please don't hurt my children." At that point, Deputy Anthony Aston fires his weapon, putting a bullet in her neck, killing her.
    Officers next entered the bedroom, where Dep. Aston then put the tip of his MP-5 assault submachine gun against Larry Pratt's head. When Pratt asked if he could move, another officer said that if he did, he'd have his head blown off.
    Though a subsequent investigation by a civilian inquest jury found the shooting "unjustified," the officer who shot and killed Pratt was never charged.
    Sources:
    Jolayne Houtz, "Suit filed against city, county in SWAT death -- Officers also named in Everett shooting," Seattle Times, October 16, 1992.
    Rick Anderson, "License to Kill," Seattle Weekly, November 3, 1999.

    The Ditton Family

    April 2, 1991—WA

    In April 1991, police raid the home of James Ditton, a disabled Vietnam veteran, based on drug dog alerts to a U.S. Mail package sent to the residence. Police break down the Dittons' door, putting a gash in the head of three year-old Daniel Ditton, who happens to be standing on the other side as police storm in. The elder Ditton is handcuffed and thrown to the ground at gunpoint.
    Police find half an ounce of marijuana and, according to the Seattle Times, "a few amphetamines." Police refuse to pay medical bills for the younger Ditton, who requires seven stitches.
    The package thought to have contained marijuana is found to have contained orchids.
    Source:
    Christy Scattarella, "Drug raids spark debate -- what happens when police with warrants search wrong house?" Seattle Times, April 22, 1991, p. B1.

    The Chinn Family

    June 12, 1990—WA

    In June 1990, an anonymous informant gave Seattle police five addresses where marijuana was allegedly being sold. Two of them prove to be wrong.
    The first was the home of Warren Chinn, also the Washington State horseracing commissioner at the time. At around midnight, police storm the Chinn household without knocking. Chinn's wife Honoria is at home with her 90 year-old mother. Mrs. Chinn is handcuffed, violently thrown to the ground (she sustains significant bruising), and held at gunpoint. Police begin to search the house, then realize they're at the wrong address.
    Warren Chinn, a political refugee who came to the U.S. in 1952, would later tell a reporter, "This is why I left China." Chinn also wondered what might have happend had he or his son been home. "Somebody break down my door and I start shooting. You would do that, too."
    A Seattle police department official would later tell the media that "it's rare that anything like this happens."
    Sources:
    Christy Scattarella, "Drug raids spark debate -- what happens when police with warrants search wrong house?" Seattle Times, April 22, 1991, p. B1.
    Devin Smith, "Police bust wrong home in drug raid," Seattle Times, June 16, 1990.

    Erdman Bascomb

    February 17, 1988—WA

    In February 1988, police in Seattle, Washington conduct a late-night drug raid on the home of 41-year old Erdman Bascomb after an informant tells them there's cocaine inside.
    Police knock on Bascomb's door, wait just a few seconds, then force the door open with a battering ram. Officer Bob Lisoski confronts Bascomb in the darkened apartment, mistakenly believes Bascomb to be holding a gun, and shoots him dead. Bascomb was holding only the remote control for his television.
    Police found no drugs or weapons in Bascomb's home. In 1995, a federal jury found no wrongdoing on the part of Seattle police, and awarded Bascomb's family no damages.
    Police Chief Patrick Fitzsimons, who had retired by the time the case made it to trial, told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer that "Police work requires a lot of high-risk situations and split-second decisions. Our officers are well-trained and exercise their best judgment. On a rare occasion, something tragic happens. But there is an awful lot of tragedy in the crack cocaine world."
    Sources:
    Paul Shukovsky, "Jury Rules in Favor of Police; Man's Shooting Called a 'Tragedy,'" Seattle Post-Intelligencer, November 16, 1995, p. B3.
    Peter Lewis, "Police officer and city sued in fatal shooting," Seattle Times, January 11, 1991, p. C5.

    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    If the police arrested the wrong people, or raided the wrong house, then yes, they deserve to be ridiculed, sued, or have other disciplinary action taken against them, such as an unpaid suspension.

    Aside from that, I agree with raids under certain circumstances. There are many instances in which the suspect is simply too armed and/or dangerous for the police to conduct a casual arrest in public.

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    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    Do any of you believe that private citizens should be just as well armed as their governments standing army?

    I do. If they can use a MK19 on me, I should be equally as armed, would make challenging our liberty a bit risky if you ask me.
    Nevada Campus Carry: The Movement Continues
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    Yes. I feel law abiding citizens should have the right to be just as armed as their government officials. Either way, it's available for those who truly want it, regardless if they get it legally or illegally. It's too bad Washington State has a ban on automatic weapons for citizens.

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    Regular Member Nevada carrier's Avatar
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    The police just can't wait to kick in doors like the marines they see in Afghanistan on Faux News. Some junky tells the cops something he thinks they will like and next thing you know a school teacher is dead and her children have to be raised in foster care.

    @#$% these cops.. No knock warrant means I get to shoot first and ask questions later. If I die in the process and I'm certain I will, at least I died in defense of my own liberty. To die for my liberty would not be a wasted life.
    Nevada Campus Carry: The Movement Continues
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    Nevada carrier wrote:
    The police just can't wait to kick in doors like the marines they see in Afghanistan on Faux News. Some junky tells the cops something he thinks they will like and next thing you know a school teacher is dead and her children have to be raised in foster care.

    @#$% these cops.. No knock warrant means I get to shoot first and ask questions later. If I die in the process and I'm certain I will, at least I died in defense of my own liberty. To die for my liberty would not be a wasted life.
    Yes, the cops who broke in on the wrong homes were very careless, but there's no need to make a blanket remark on all law enforcement officers who actually do their job right.
    What is your opinion on the armed forces killing someone who turned out to be a good guy, or an innocent citizen?

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    Oh really??? Please tell me where I can legally buy an AA-12, cuz I sure would love an automatic shotgun...

    I would also like a full auto FN 2000 and a P90 (I know that tons of LEOs use P90s)... oh wait, I can't get one legally? you just said I could...

    Don't tell me you are talking about spending $20,000+ on a 25 year old AR-15, are you? if so, don't make me laugh... That is not "allowing citizens to be as well armed as the government"

  23. #23
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    Aaron1124 wrote:
    If the police arrested the wrong people, or raided the wrong house, then yes, they deserve to be ridiculed, sued, or have other disciplinary action taken against them, such as an unpaid suspension.

    Aside from that, I agree with raids under certain circumstances. There are many instances in which the suspect is simply too armed and/or dangerous for the police to conduct a casual arrest in public.
    Your logic is flawed.

    If a criminal is considered armed and dangerous when out in public where he might have a knife or a handgun tucked into his waistband, then he will be more likely to be even better armed in his own home, where he can store long guns, and have extra ammo at hand. He can also hide behind doors, walls and furniture, and return fire from fortified or defensive positions with much greater ease.

    The increasing use of SWAT-style raids to apprehend non-violent criminals is a massive tactical, ethical, legal, and public-relations FAIL...

    LAPD does it so often that they have a "Wrong Door Unit", which is a carpenter who is on the city's payroll to repair doors they kick in when they raid the wrong house...

    http://reason.com/blog/2008/03/16/la...g-door-team-to
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    Aaron1124 wrote:
    What is your opinion on the armed forces killing someone who turned out to be a good guy, or an innocent citizen?
    You mean like the military?

    I think it is appalling. I think that any time an innocent life is taken it is a crime.

    I know that there is "collateral damage" in war that is sometimes difficult to avoid, but when it happens and is easily avoidable, it is a crime.

    Like the recently-released video of the children in the van getting shot by a helicopter. They could clearly see there were children in that van, and yet they not only pulled the trigger, they joked afterwards that the victims "shouldn't bring kids to a war"...
    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

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    Aaron1124 wrote:
    Nevada carrier wrote:
    The police just can't wait to kick in doors like the marines they see in Afghanistan on Faux News. Some junky tells the cops something he thinks they will like and next thing you know a school teacher is dead and her children have to be raised in foster care.

    @#$% these cops.. No knock warrant means I get to shoot first and ask questions later. If I die in the process and I'm certain I will, at least I died in defense of my own liberty. To die for my liberty would not be a wasted life.
    Yes, the cops who broke in on the wrong homes were very careless, but there's no need to make a blanket remark on all law enforcement officers who actually do their job right.
    What is your opinion on the armed forces killing someone who turned out to be a good guy, or an innocent citizen?
    Very simple: war in a battlefield is very different from day to day business in the sovereign territory of the US. Police can make mistakes, too. But if that mistake results in unlawful entry in to my home, they will pay for it with their lives.

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