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Thread: Anybody have an update?

  1. #1
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    ...on the rogue cop who openly advocated shooting open carriers on sight? I've seen nothing about it in recent weeks.

  2. #2
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    Don't expect to. Not sure how it works in "free states," but in CA the internal investigation is not open to the public because of "employee confidentiality" laws.

    That means no PRAR, no FOIA, and there are civil penalties if the "employee disciplinary action" is leaked to the public.
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  3. #3
    Regular Member Rich Keagy's Avatar
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    Do you suppose he kept his job?
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    Rich Keagy wrote:
    Do you suppose he kept his job?
    I know he has, He was interviewed i nthe paper last week about a drive.

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    CA_Libertarian wrote:
    there are civil penalties if the "employee disciplinary action" is leaked to the public.
    So... lemme see if I got this correct?

    Lets just say that an employee says something really dumb about how he would handle a work situation, and the employer chooses to demote them one paygrade, 2 days of PR training, and 2 weeks modified duty. The newspaper finds out about the comments and the subsequent discipline and runs the story in the papers.

    Now if the employee works for McDonalds, then its ok to run the story cause the guy was just talking about flipping burgers with no hair net.
    Or the guy worked for a car shop, then it's ok to run the story cause the guy was talking about pouring used fluids down the drain instead of recycling it.

    But lets just say the employee is a Palo Alto police officer, he was talking about breaking the law, violating civil rights, and about killing people. now it becomes a "hush-hush" story because in California you cant talk about the police? or release publicly the discipline he received?

  6. #6
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    thats about the truth of it

  7. #7
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    .

  8. #8
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    Slidell Jim wrote:
    CA_Libertarian wrote:
    there are civil penalties if the "employee disciplinary action" is leaked to the public.
    So... lemme see if I got this correct?

    Lets just say that an employee says something really dumb about how he would handle a work situation, and the employer chooses to demote them one paygrade, 2 days of PR training, and 2 weeks modified duty. The newspaper finds out about the comments and the subsequent discipline and runs the story in the papers.

    Now if the employee works for McDonalds, then its ok to run the story cause the guy was just talking about flipping burgers with no hair net.
    Or the guy worked for a car shop, then it's ok to run the story cause the guy was talking about pouring used fluids down the drain instead of recycling it.

    But lets just say the employee is a Palo Alto police officer, he was talking about breaking the law, violating civil rights, and about killing people. now it becomes a "hush-hush" story because in California you cant talk about the police? or release publicly the discipline he received?
    All 3 of the above scenarios fall under "employee confidentiality" laws.

    The difference is the guy flipping burgers probably doesn't have the money for a lawyer, let alone a union that supplies a lawyer free of charge.
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  9. #9
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    Slidell Jim wrote:
    CA_Libertarian wrote:
    there are civil penalties if the "employee disciplinary action" is leaked to the public.
    So... lemme see if I got this correct?

    Lets just say that an employee says something really dumb about how he would handle a work situation, and the employer chooses to demote them one paygrade, 2 days of PR training, and 2 weeks modified duty. The newspaper finds out about the comments and the subsequent discipline and runs the story in the papers.

    Now if the employee works for McDonalds, then its ok to run the story cause the guy was just talking about flipping burgers with no hair net.
    Or the guy worked for a car shop, then it's ok to run the story cause the guy was talking about pouring used fluids down the drain instead of recycling it.

    But lets just say the employee is a Palo Alto police officer, he was talking about breaking the law, violating civil rights, and about killing people. now it becomes a "hush-hush" story because in California you cant talk about the police? or release publicly the discipline he received?
    Just keep saying it to yourself...

    East Palo Alto

    East
    Palo Alto


    Different city, different county...

    But coming back around, it does happen here as well. The Palo Alto Daily Post has been running a series of articles, the latest of which mentioned this case.

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/qws/ff...l&Submit=S

    The article mostly focused on the fact that this officer was named, but not the most recent one convicted of DUI.

    http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/civica...p?BlobID=18425

    Search for DUI with your PDF reader.

    The citizens of this city went so far as to ask the USDOJ for help in naming the officer. As far as I know, it has not happened yet. He/She is still on the job today.

    BTW, the above Palo Alto City Council PDF also has this little snippet in it:

    P.S.S. What great American (Founding Father???) said: "An Unarmed people is subject to slavery at any time." ? Can't wait for the 2nd Amendment rally to be held in Malcolm X Plaza (formerly Lytton Plaza) Saturday March 6-2010 11 am-1 pm. We need to support this rally and the folks who are staging it--they are standing up for our constitution big time!!!
    Yay...

    Also, page 83 has a letter from a Palo Alto High School sophmore, asking the city council why his Airsoft gun is illegal to use in Palo Alto, yet friends in surrounding communities can use theirs.

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