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Thread: kids and carry

  1. #1
    McX
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    looks like we could use another topic to discuss on here. so i thought i'd venture this one; we who carry have an effect on our kids. were all proud of our kids, and like to talk about them, so i thought this topic would be a natural. so i'll start it off;

    many of you have met my oldest, he's a carrier too. him and i discuss things, and set our plans. recently he and i spoke of 'car carry'. his position is; dad, you got the home covered with the home gun, and the shop covered with the shop gun. but i'm mobile, and want to car carry- in an approved and legal manner. made me jealous, as i don't have a car gun yet. so he's ventured off into a venue i have yet to do, and i am jealous!

    many of you have met my youngest; he's going to be a damn fine carrier too. the little guy is only 13 years old, and begged me to give him something to carry for events too. i had to broken heartedly tell him; you can't carry yet peanut! Your day will come. still, he's interested, and envolved in any event i attend, and gets broken hearted when he doesn't come with me. chip off the old block!

    ps; the oldest and i discussed the extra mag. thing i've been thinking on, and he's going to load up his extra for car carry. i'd like to get him an xd45 if i ever get the coin together for my next gun purchase too!


  2. #2
    Campaign Veteran rcawdor57's Avatar
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    Steven,
    I have carried around my kids (well, they are ALL adults now) for many, many years and all of my kids (all five of them) are well versed in firearms except my oldest. My oldest (the only woman of the bunch) has never taken the time nor the interest in learning how to use her .357 magnum I gave her when she turned 21 or how to use her shotgun I gave her. Heck, I don't think she has ever fired a round! Now one would think that my daughter would not care for guns. Oh...just the opposite! She is a staunch supporter of ALL of our rights and understands that the 2nd Amendment IS the one RIGHT that keeps the others running smoothly. Time has passed and she is a mother of two now and living far away and is "too busy" to get her guns out and learn how to use them. Every time I visit her I try to find a bit of time in her schedule to go out and shoot. She home schools her kids and that in itself takes up most of the day. With all that said all of my children (except my daughter) can shoot many different types of firearms from shotguns to semis to pistols to revolvers and all of them own several different types of firearms. I did my best to educate them about our rights and how important it is to KNOW them all and exercise them all or we lose them one at a time.

    As for the extra magazine....I don't know...I think if I had to use my G36 I could hit six targets up close with enough damage that they would stop their attacks on me or my family. Years ago I carried a big ole 9mm with 18 rounds in one magazine. It wasn't long after that I saw where TWO policemen were shot at by TWO assailants during a traffic stop and every single round fired MISSED. Both the cops and the assailants MISSED and they were only about 14 feet or less from each other. So....watch the movie "The Unforgiven" or skip to the end where C.E. does his thing in the bar. I know it cannot be easy to maintain calm during an event like that but if one can do it then every round fired will find it's intended target.

    Oh, and everyone should reload if possible and teach your kids how to do the same! Heck, my wife's 10 y.o. has learned how to prepare brass and reload from me and actually helps me reload .223!
    “The Constitution shall never be construed... to prevent the People of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms.” -- Samuel Adams

    “Today, we need a nation of Minutemen. Citizens who are not only prepared to take arms, but citizens who regard the preservation of freedom as the basic purpose of their daily life and who are willing to consciously work and sacrifice for that freedom.”

    —John F. Kennedy

  3. #3
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    I have one adult daughter that learned the hard way about needing a gun and not having it. Supposedly her mother's cop friends fixed that. My X-OL got her CWP, before I left, and CCW's a Kel-Tec.

    My daughter lived in a college apt. community and saw a guy on her 2nd floor balcony. Called the cops and waited while the BG gave up and left before the cops arrived.

  4. #4
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    I have six kids the oldest three are girls and the youngest three are boys. My boys carry toy guns because they are 6,7,& 9. (they girls are 14, 13, and 11) I do take them shooting whenever we go to Grandpa's and Grandma's if they want to. My oldest boy loves to shoot his .22.

    All of my kids have shot all of my guns if they wanted to. It has become old to them. The last time I went out shooting my S&W .40 I asked if anyone wanted to shoot with me and they just looked at me and said, "no." Guns are such a part of their lives that they really don't think anything of them. As a mater of fact they think it strange if my wife and I aren't carrying.

    They all have a healthy respect for guns and are in the proses of learning to shoot. Every time I have bought a new gun the first thing I do is show the kids. I teach them how to load and unload and break it down to clean it. All the curiosity is gone.

    I could go on and on but...
    Don't confuse me with the facts, I have my emotions!

    I guess that's the difference between no crime and "stopping" a crime in progress. I prefer no crime.

  5. #5
    Regular Member johnny amish's Avatar
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    Almost everytime I carry my children are with. It has proven to be a good time to talk about the responsibility of self protection, the second amendment, the constitution, and the need to be active in standing up for the things we believe in. It has been a great way for usto communicate on these issues. I suspect they will be very active with the carry issues of this state.
    "To sin by silence, when we should protest makes cowards out of men."
    Ella Wheeler Cox


    We must contact our lawmakers today, tomorrow and the next day to remind them of Constitutional Carry.
    Laws are not written because of the actions of many, they are wrtiten because of the inactions of many.

  6. #6
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    My five year old is very curious about it and she knows I carry for her protection, and her younger sister and mother's. She actually asks mequstions about the constitution occasionally and I try to answer themso she will understand. Recently I had difficulty explaning to her there may be times when she shouldn't answer a cop's questions!

    She hasalso asked me who would protect her while she is at school since I wasn't there. She asked if I thought maybe her kindergarten teachers hadguns to protect her and her friends from anybad people. I had to explain to her about the GFSZ and she thought that was stupid.

    She has her own .22 (Davey Crickett single shot) and already knows the rules. When I brought it home the first thing she asked was "How do I check if it is loaded?" while making sure her finger was nowhere near the trigger.

    I'm hoping the youngerwill beas enthusiastic and so far all signs point to yes.



  7. #7
    Founder's Club Member bnhcomputing's Avatar
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    I'll share one instance:

    I went to the store with my 4-yr-old daughter. She rides in the backseat (safety you know). Anyway, I open the slider door on the van, and she unbuckles. She always waits for me to holster up, and then help her out of the van. So for her, me carrying is something I've ALWAYS done.

    Anyway, one day as I'm inserting the mag, she says, "Daddy, what's the second part for?" I am flabbergasted to say the least. She has been paying attention and know EXACTLY what a firearm is and does at 4-years-old. My answer, "That's the part that makes it work."



  8. #8
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    I didn't grow up with firearms, unfortunately, so I don't have childhood experiences of my own to draw from. I don't have children, but when I do I intend to teach them about guns; I don't want them to be taboo or forbidden items, and I want my kids to internalize and practice gun safety rules. Do you guys have a specific resources (books, websites, etc) that you learned strategies from?

  9. #9
    Regular Member Hunting Mama's Avatar
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    I personally haven't oc'd yet (I haven't found exactly what I am looking for yet), but bothmy husband and myself grew up around guns and hunting. Both our kids (girls ages 7 &9) have been brought up around guns. Learning how they work, shootingand what the result would be if someone was shot (exampled by the dead deer, bear, etc). I must say seeing them practice with us gives us joy that the heritage of gun ownership will continue through our lines (as long as the gov. doesn't go any further in their arsebackward movements). Anyways, it is good to hear the stories from everyone about passing on the gun ownership heritage to their kids. Keep it up!

  10. #10
    Regular Member Gordo's Avatar
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    I grew up around guns, so for me they were as normal as a fork on the kitchen table. I knew how to handle them properly and safely. Now years later I have introduced my wife to guns and taught her. My kids are 2 and 4 but my 4 year old already is starting to learn about them. She doesn't get to handle them yet but she is around them and knows that she has to wait a another year or two before she can learn to shoot. Hopefully for my kids it will be the same as it was for me, normal. There was never any curiosity that led me or my brothers to my dad's closet to play with them because we knew what they were, what they did and when it was ok and not ok to handle them.
    Former Corporal of Marines.

  11. #11
    Campaign Veteran rcawdor57's Avatar
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    petrophase wrote:
    I didn't grow up with firearms, unfortunately, so I don't have childhood experiences of my own to draw from. I don't have children, but when I do I intend to teach them about guns; I don't want them to be taboo or forbidden items, and I want my kids to internalize and practice gun safety rules. Do you guys have a specific resources (books, websites, etc) that you learned strategies from?
    I learned about guns because we had them everywhere....literally. We had shotguns, rifles and a few handguns throughout the house and they were basically part of the decor. None of us "played" with them or ever even thought of using them against anyone. That was the way it was when I grew up in rural Alabama. I think every friend I had and every neighbor had at least one gun in their house and no one thought anything bad about it. With guns part of our lives there was nothing "evil" about guns. They were tools that we used when we needed them. As for safety it is very simple as far as I am concerned and this is what my grandfather and father taught me: 1)Guns are always loaded (even when you know they aren't)
    2)Never point your gun at anything you do not intend to shoot
    3)Be sure of your target before you pull the trigger because once the bullet is fired you cannot get it back.
    I am sure there were others but I cannot think of them.

    Back in my younger years these things were "common knowledge" even among the most brain dead people in the community and no one ever had a firearm "accident" or "incident". It never happened. Now guns are "evil" and people think these inert pieces of metal, wood and plastic have minds of their owns and must be "locked up" and "Placed out of reach" and all kinds of other "do good" laws that apply because people just do NOT understand what a firearm is or can do (with a person at the helm).

    It is all common sense and if you follow the simple rules I have no one should ever be hurt. I know there are books and videos and perhaps....(don't attack me you NRA haters!) the "Eddie Eagle" program the NRA has may be of interest to you.

    As for the kids I have now (my wife's kids, all girls) they have now learned how to use firearms. At first they were afraid due to their misconceptions but now they are eager to go to the range. There is nothing like watching the face of a young girl firing her handgun for the first time.

    “The Constitution shall never be construed... to prevent the People of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms.” -- Samuel Adams

    “Today, we need a nation of Minutemen. Citizens who are not only prepared to take arms, but citizens who regard the preservation of freedom as the basic purpose of their daily life and who are willing to consciously work and sacrifice for that freedom.”

    —John F. Kennedy

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