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Thread: Status of Registry Repeal and.....

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    What is the status of the long gun reg. repeal and if its already come to a vote what is the status of the Liberal & NDPers who voted for the repeal back in November 2009?

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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...b=TopStoriesV2

    Liberals will vote against Tory gun law

    Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff says he wants to reform the controversial gun registry, and has asked his caucus to vote against a bill that would scrap it.

    To win the support of reluctant Liberal MPs, Ignatieff said the registry should be amended to make it easier on owners of shotguns and rifles, particularly those who live in remote regions.

    Ignatieff has suggested abolishing fees needed to obtain, renew or upgrade a gun licence. First-time infractions for failing to register a firearm should become a "simple, non-criminal ticketing offence," he said, and not a criminal offence. He also pledged to make the registration process easier.

    "If we want and need people to register their firearms, we shouldn't be creating unnecessary obstacles," Ignatieff said at a Canadian Police Association conference.

    "Canadians want gun control that works, and that treats gun owners fairly," he said. "But we won't abandon gun control. Not when rifles and shotguns are responsible for half the police officers killed in the line of duty in the last few years. Not when the gun registry is a vital tool that law enforcement uses every single day."

    Some Liberals and NDP members voted with the Tories when a private member's bill came up for second reading in November. Bill C-391, would scrap the registry if passed on its third and final reading. It would also destroy the registry's records on about seven million shotguns and rifles.

    Liberals who voted for the bill in November weren't punished. But with his proposed reforms, Ignatieff said his caucus will be required to vote against the bill at its third and final reading, which is expected to take place in May.

    It remains to be seen whether the party will vote in unison. But Liberal whip Rodger Cuzner said he's confident that the proposed reforms have assuaged members of the caucus who have been critical of the registry.

    "I'm very pleased with the conversations we've had with those who have had concerns," Cuzner said on CTV's Power Play. "And I'm sure that those conversations will continue."

    "We're looking forward to the full support of caucus on this," he added.

    Should Liberal MPs vote unanimously against the bill, it could still be passed if enough New Democrats support it. NDP Leader Jack Layton has not said whether MPs in his party would face disciplinary measures if they vote for the bill at final reading.

    The registry contains information on about seven million guns. Opponents say it's too expensive, infringes on the rights of law-abiding gun owners and does little to keep guns out of the hands of criminals.

    However, the Canadian Police Association, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, and the Canadian Association of Police Boards all support the registry.

    RCMP Deputy Commissioner Bill Sweeney has also spoken out in support of the registry.

    "I believe that there's compelling evidence that the registry promotes officer and public safety," Sweeney told the Commons public safety committee in March.

    In 2009, the long-gun registry was accessed by police 11,000 times a day, according to a Liberal press release.

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    In 2009, the long-gun registry was accessed by police 11,000 times a day, according to a Liberal press release.
    So was the phone book.
    It does not matter.
    What does matter is how many CRIMES were solved.
    Why are they ashamed to release that info?
    Could it be because it is nearly zero?

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    hi buster,

    just curious, what made you take such an interest in Canadian gun rights?

    we definitely need as much support as we can in this long and tough battle with the registry.

    the only thing that upsets me is that the restricted firearms (handguns, semiauto rifles) are being ignored. I don't know how many BILLIONS went into the handgun registry that started in 1934, but I think it would be safe to assume that it cost way more than long-gun registry.

    but, it is a step in the right direction. People have told me "baby steps!", it's just difficult to sit here and wait for something to give with the handgun registry, and all the silly restrictions. In many of the US states you can legally carry a firearm for protection... in Canada, one of our reasons for repealing the registry is for the sake of the farmers and duck hunters.

    Personally, I dont' hunt, and may never hunt in my life. I have nothing against it, and will support those who do enjoy those activities! we keep fighting for the duck hunters, farmers, and sport shooters, but no one really brings up firearms for self defense!

    If I were on the other side of the fence and didn't care to have firearms or have anyone else own firearms, I would expect a better reason to keep firearms than for farming, sport shooting, or hunting!! I would want people to tell me "hey, we want these to defend ourselves from criminals and, of course, the government!"

    unfortunately for us Canadians, we didn't go the route that the US did when separating from the brits. we should have had the same amendments as the US does, then we could be more protected. Our right to bear arms seems a little vague and not nearly as concrete as the 2nd amendment. damn shame. Our rights to bear arms was shot down by at least 2 cases in Canada, sorry I'll have to search for them.

    The mentality of the Canadian people, in general, show that we don't need firearms and we can do just fine without them. I don't think this way, but there are more people that do think this way. These people would rather die, or leave their families to die because they don't believe in self defense with a firearm... oh ya, did you all know that we can not even use pepper spray for self defense against another human being??? yup, we can sure buy it, and use it against animals, but not against some cracked out loser thats about to kill you.

    Before we even begin to fight for our rights to bear arms, we need to fight for our rights to defend ourselves and our property.

    I love Canada, good people, but god bless America for having people with the balls to stand up and take/keep what's rightfully theirs!

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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    floflo wrote:
    hi buster,

    just curious, what made you take such an interest in Canadian gun rights?
    I'm a Canadian who immigrated to the US and amnow a US Citizen.

    You are right, the laws in Canada are no good. I went to school in Torontoclose to Jane and Finch, andhad guns and knives pointed at me more times in Canada than I ever expect to in theUS. But wait, those items are controlled and dangerous....? I guess those that were doing the pointing at mewere Criminals.

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    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    hi buster,

    just curious, what made you take such an interest in Canadian gun rights?
    I'm a Canadian who immigrated to the US and amnow a US Citizen.

    You are right, the laws in Canada are no good. I went to school in Torontoclose to Jane and Finch, andhad guns and knives pointed at me more times in Canada than I ever expect to in theUS. But wait, those items are controlled and dangerous....? I guess those that were doing the pointing at mewere Criminals.
    I always wanted to live in the US, did you immigrate due to work moving you there? I'm still trying to find a way to move to the US, but not having much luck. I guess I can do that green card lottery, because I really don't want to do the border run



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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    hi buster,

    just curious, what made you take such an interest in Canadian gun rights?
    I'm a Canadian who immigrated to the US and amnow a US Citizen.

    You are right, the laws in Canada are no good. I went to school in Torontoclose to Jane and Finch, andhad guns and knives pointed at me more times in Canada than I ever expect to in theUS. But wait, those items are controlled and dangerous....? I guess those that were doing the pointing at mewere Criminals.
    I always wanted to live in the US, did you immigrate due to work moving you there? I'm still trying to find a way to move to the US, but not having much luck. I guess I can do that green card lottery, because I really don't want to do the border run


    Work did it for me, however, that is pretty slowright at the moment.

    I don't think the lottery is going to work for you. It is also called the diversity lottery. Unless you are diverse, you are SOL.


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    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    hi buster,

    just curious, what made you take such an interest in Canadian gun rights?
    I'm a Canadian who immigrated to the US and amnow a US Citizen.

    You are right, the laws in Canada are no good. I went to school in Torontoclose to Jane and Finch, andhad guns and knives pointed at me more times in Canada than I ever expect to in theUS. But wait, those items are controlled and dangerous....? I guess those that were doing the pointing at mewere Criminals.
    I always wanted to live in the US, did you immigrate due to work moving you there? I'm still trying to find a way to move to the US, but not having much luck. I guess I can do that green card lottery, because I really don't want to do the border run


    Work did it for me, however, that is pretty slowright at the moment.

    I don't think the lottery is going to work for you. It is also called the diversity lottery. Unless you are diverse, you are SOL.
    well, i was born outside of canada and that's what they go by. The odds are still better than winning the lottery

    do you have your permanent residence there? how long did it take?

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    Regular Member sudden valley gunner's Avatar
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    Hey don't you know Obama doesn't think we should discriminate against illegal immigrants, so why do it legally? You'd be better off sneaking in.(SARCASM)

    I know Canadians that live here and still work in Canada I am not sure how they do it, might be something to look into if you have work close to the border. And in Washington if here legally you can have a firearm, even if you are not a citizen. Again the specifics I am not clear on, but members from hereon OCDO and SAF got the bill banning aliens from firearm possession repealed.

    I am not a Canadian citizen, but am interested in spreading rights world wide especially with my neighbors so close, I can imagine a future where BC residents and Washington residents can carry their personal firearms for protection back and forth while engaged in there everyday activities. Wouldn't that be awesome.
    I am not anti Cop I am just pro Citizen.

    U.S. v. Minker, 350 US 179, at page 187
    "Because of what appears to be a lawful command on the surface, many citizens, because
    of their respect for what only appears to be a law, are cunningly coerced into waiving their
    rights, due to ignorance." (Paraphrased)

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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    floflo wrote:
    well, i was born outside of canada and that's what they go by. The odds are still better than winning the lottery

    do you have your permanent residence there? how long did it take?
    I hope it works out for you.

    It took me about 10 years in total. Lots of forms, interviews, fingerprints etc. It costs about $5k if you count all of the fees and expenses. I do live here permanently. When I go back to Canada, it feels a little wierd to me. I do like to go to the junior hockey game when I'm back in Canada though.

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    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    well, i was born outside of canada and that's what they go by. The odds are still better than winning the lottery

    do you have your permanent residence there? how long did it take?
    I hope it works out for you.

    It took me about 10 years in total. Lots of forms, interviews, fingerprints etc. It costs about $5k if you count all of the fees and expenses. I do live here permanently. When I go back to Canada, it feels a little wierd to me. I do like to go to the junior hockey game when I'm back in Canada though.
    hold on a minute... 10 years to get a permanent residence? or to get your citizenship?

    well, i'll see what I can do. who knows what can happen with firearms laws in the next 5 years (in Canada). In the US, I suspect that in 5 years you'll be able to open-carry full auto machine guns lol

    go for gold!

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    sudden valley gunner wrote:
    Hey don't you know Obama doesn't think we should discriminate against illegal immigrants, so why do it legally? You'd be better off sneaking in. (SARCASM)

    I know Canadians that live here and still work in Canada I am not sure how they do it, might be something to look into if you have work close to the border. And in Washington if here legally you can have a firearm, even if you are not a citizen. Again the specifics I am not clear on, but members from hereon OCDO and SAF got the bill banning aliens from firearm possession repealed.

    I am not a Canadian citizen, but am interested in spreading rights world wide especially with my neighbors so close, I can imagine a future where BC residents and Washington residents can carry their personal firearms for protection back and forth while engaged in there everyday activities. Wouldn't that be awesome.
    lol ya wouldn't that be a sight... canadian citizen does a mexican-style border run into the USA!

    I wonder how well our borders are protected? are they fenced up like the US/Mexican border?



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    floflo wrote:
    I wonder how well our borders are protected? are they fenced up like the US/Mexican border?

    Nope. Only well traveled or populated areas, in my neck of the woods.I used to know folks who would hike across the border in the woods all the time. Usually to importsome of B.C.'s largest cash crops.

    If you go to Ross Lake there is a white line across a dirt road marking the border, well actually been a few years since I been there. It is an out of the way place up in the cascades.
    I am not anti Cop I am just pro Citizen.

    U.S. v. Minker, 350 US 179, at page 187
    "Because of what appears to be a lawful command on the surface, many citizens, because
    of their respect for what only appears to be a law, are cunningly coerced into waiving their
    rights, due to ignorance." (Paraphrased)

  14. #14
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    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    well, i was born outside of canada and that's what they go by. The odds are still better than winning the lottery

    do you have your permanent residence there? how long did it take?
    I hope it works out for you.

    It took me about 10 years in total. Lots of forms, interviews, fingerprints etc. It costs about $5k if you count all of the fees and expenses. I do live here permanently. When I go back to Canada, it feels a little wierd to me. I do like to go to the junior hockey game when I'm back in Canada though.
    hold on a minute... 10 years to get a permanent residence? or to get your citizenship?

    well, i'll see what I can do. who knows what can happen with firearms laws in the next 5 years (in Canada). In the US, I suspect that in 5 years you'll be able to open-carry full auto machine guns lol

    go for gold!
    10 years total. I was on a work visa for about 5, then I had a provisional permanent residence for a year, then a permanent resident for 3, then a year in application to be a citizen, then the oath.

    Normally, after someone gets the permanent residence (green card), they have to wait for 5 years before they can apply to be a citizen. In the case of permanent residence through marriage, one only has to wait for 3 years.

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    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    well, i was born outside of canada and that's what they go by. The odds are still better than winning the lottery

    do you have your permanent residence there? how long did it take?
    I hope it works out for you.

    It took me about 10 years in total. Lots of forms, interviews, fingerprints etc. It costs about $5k if you count all of the fees and expenses. I do live here permanently. When I go back to Canada, it feels a little wierd to me. I do like to go to the junior hockey game when I'm back in Canada though.
    hold on a minute... 10 years to get a permanent residence? or to get your citizenship?

    well, i'll see what I can do. who knows what can happen with firearms laws in the next 5 years (in Canada). In the US, I suspect that in 5 years you'll be able to open-carry full auto machine guns lol

    go for gold!
    10 years total. I was on a work visa for about 5, then I had a provisional permanent residence for a year, then a permanent resident for 3, then a year in application to be a citizen, then the oath.

    Normally, after someone gets the permanent residence (green card), they have to wait for 5 years before they can apply to be a citizen. In the case of permanent residence through marriage, one only has to wait for 3 years.
    hehe well, I'm already married

    so what's life like where you live? can you compare it to living in Canada? here's a hot question - what's the healthcare like? is it as bad as michael moore's documentaries about the US ?

  16. #16
    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    well, i was born outside of canada and that's what they go by. The odds are still better than winning the lottery

    do you have your permanent residence there? how long did it take?
    I hope it works out for you.

    It took me about 10 years in total. Lots of forms, interviews, fingerprints etc. It costs about $5k if you count all of the fees and expenses. I do live here permanently. When I go back to Canada, it feels a little wierd to me. I do like to go to the junior hockey game when I'm back in Canada though.
    hold on a minute... 10 years to get a permanent residence? or to get your citizenship?

    well, i'll see what I can do. who knows what can happen with firearms laws in the next 5 years (in Canada). In the US, I suspect that in 5 years you'll be able to open-carry full auto machine guns lol

    go for gold!
    10 years total. I was on a work visa for about 5, then I had a provisional permanent residence for a year, then a permanent resident for 3, then a year in application to be a citizen, then the oath.

    Normally, after someone gets the permanent residence (green card), they have to wait for 5 years before they can apply to be a citizen. In the case of permanent residence through marriage, one only has to wait for 3 years.
    hehe well, I'm already married

    so what's life like where you live? can you compare it to living in Canada? here's a hot question - what's the health care like? is it as bad as michael moore's documentaries about the US ?
    Michael Moore is an idiot who makes biased "documentaries" that adhere to his political agenda. He is the same dummy that said Canadians leave their doors unlocked because it is so safe. :quirky

    My basic problem with health care in Canada is the shortageof equipment and doctors. You may hear opponents of thehealth care reform in the US claim that Canadians are limited by their health coverage as to what doctors and procedures they can get. That isn't true. You can have whatever you want absolutely free (well...it's not really free, but most people ignore the big deduction off theirpaycheck used to pay for their health care), however, there aren'tenoughmachinesand doctors to go around, so you get put on a waiting list.

    My father waited 6 months for a quadruple bypass in Canada. My wife's unclewaited 4 days in the US. In the town where I lived for about 30 yearsin Canada, where the population was somewhere between75K and 110K, the hospitaldid not have any MRI or CAT scan equipment (and still doesn't as far as I know). You had to go about an hour and a halfaway to get those services. Guess what...waiting list. Of course, the hospital in town didn't do bypass surgery, so my dad had to go that hour and a half for that too.

    In Canada, the only reason I never waited to see my family doctor was because I had an agreement with him through a sports clubI played for.When I went to see him, I went through a backdoor and went to the front of the line. His waiting room was always full, and some patients waited for hours to see him. There weren't enough doctors in the town I lived in, so every doctor was overbooked like this allthe time. New people in town had to go on a waiting list to even get a family doctor.Here is the bad news for those on a new doctor waiting list, no family doctor, no appointment with a specialist.

    Remember my dad? After his quadruple bypass (at which time a pacemaker was installed), his family doctor passed away. Oh oh. He was on the waiting list for a new family doctor, when he had to be admitted back into the hospital after a fall. They were shocked that a 68 year old man, with a pacemaker, within months after a quadruple bypass didn't have a family doctor. Of course whey weren'tshocked enough to get him one.

    In the US, I wait about 15 to 20 minutes to see my doctor. I don't have to have a special arrangement, and can wait in line like everyone else. When I move and need to get a new doctor, there is no waiting list.

    So, there are varying opinions about the quality of care in Canada, and in comparing health care systems between Canada and the US. Here is my take: The health care system inCanada is great,as long as you don't get sick or injured. As always, your mileage may vary and others may get care in Canada that meets their needs.

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    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    well, i was born outside of canada and that's what they go by. The odds are still better than winning the lottery

    do you have your permanent residence there? how long did it take?
    I hope it works out for you.

    It took me about 10 years in total. Lots of forms, interviews, fingerprints etc. It costs about $5k if you count all of the fees and expenses. I do live here permanently. When I go back to Canada, it feels a little wierd to me. I do like to go to the junior hockey game when I'm back in Canada though.
    hold on a minute... 10 years to get a permanent residence? or to get your citizenship?

    well, i'll see what I can do. who knows what can happen with firearms laws in the next 5 years (in Canada). In the US, I suspect that in 5 years you'll be able to open-carry full auto machine guns lol

    go for gold!
    10 years total. I was on a work visa for about 5, then I had a provisional permanent residence for a year, then a permanent resident for 3, then a year in application to be a citizen, then the oath.

    Normally, after someone gets the permanent residence (green card), they have to wait for 5 years before they can apply to be a citizen. In the case of permanent residence through marriage, one only has to wait for 3 years.
    hehe well, I'm already married

    so what's life like where you live? can you compare it to living in Canada? here's a hot question - what's the health care like? is it as bad as michael moore's documentaries about the US ?
    Michael Moore is an idiot who makes biased "documentaries" that adhere to his political agenda. He is the same dummy that said Canadians leave their doors unlocked because it is so safe. :quirky

    My basic problem with health care in Canada is the shortageof equipment and doctors. You may hear opponents of thehealth care reform in the US claim that Canadians are limited by their health coverage as to what doctors and procedures they can get. That isn't true. You can have whatever you want absolutely free (well...it's not really free, but most people ignore the big deduction off theirpaycheck used to pay for their health care), however, there aren'tenoughmachinesand doctors to go around, so you get put on a waiting list.

    My father waited 6 months for a quadruple bypass in Canada. My wife's unclewaited 4 days in the US. In the town where I lived for about 30 yearsin Canada, where the population was somewhere between75K and 110K, the hospitaldid not have any MRI or CAT scan equipment (and still doesn't as far as I know). You had to go about an hour and a halfaway to get those services. Guess what...waiting list. Of course, the hospital in town didn't do bypass surgery, so my dad had to go that hour and a half for that too.

    In Canada, the only reason I never waited to see my family doctor was because I had an agreement with him through a sports clubI played for.When I went to see him, I went through a backdoor and went to the front of the line. His waiting room was always full, and some patients waited for hours to see him. There weren't enough doctors in the town I lived in, so every doctor was overbooked like this allthe time. New people in town had to go on a waiting list to even get a family doctor.Here is the bad news for those on a new doctor waiting list, no family doctor, no appointment with a specialist.

    Remember my dad? After his quadruple bypass (at which time a pacemaker was installed), his family doctor passed away. Oh oh. He was on the waiting list for a new family doctor, when he had to be admitted back into the hospital after a fall. They were shocked that a 68 year old man, with a pacemaker, within months after a quadruple bypass didn't have a family doctor. Of course whey weren'tshocked enough to get him one.

    In the US, I wait about 15 to 20 minutes to see my doctor. I don't have to have a special arrangement, and can wait in line like everyone else. When I move and need to get a new doctor, there is no waiting list.

    So, there are varying opinions about the quality of care in Canada, and in comparing health care systems between Canada and the US. Here is my take: The health care system inCanada is great,as long as you don't get sick or injured. As always, your mileage may vary and others may get care in Canada that meets their needs.
    I can definitely see what you're saying about canadian healthcare. I live in Calgary, where it's very hard to find a family doctor. I always hear people talking about how the US has the worst healthcare, but it doesn't seem to be that bad... as long as you have health insurance. some employers pay for health insurance, is that right?



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    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    floflo wrote:
    I can definitely see what you're saying about canadian healthcare. I live in Calgary, where it's very hard to find a family doctor. I always hear people talking about how the US has the worst healthcare, but it doesn't seem to be that bad... as long as you have health insurance. some employers pay for health insurance, is that right?

    They do. They pay for it in Canada too, just in a different way.

  19. #19
    Regular Member sudden valley gunner's Avatar
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    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    I can definitely see what you're saying about canadian healthcare. I live in Calgary, where it's very hard to find a family doctor. I always hear people talking about how the US has the worst healthcare, but it doesn't seem to be that bad... as long as you have health insurance. some employers pay for health insurance, is that right?

    They do. They pay for it in Canada too, just in a different way.
    It's not that bad even if you don't have insurance. I don't and had about $50,000.00 worth of work done on my foot last year after an accident. I don't know how I am going to pay it but that is worked out after the fact, here in the states. Even if all I can pay is $10.00 a month they can't do anything by law.

    Personally I'd rather have the freedom than have something forced down my throat for my "own good".

    Mike has some good articles on what can happen and probably will with our privacy and gun rights might be something worth reading.
    I am not anti Cop I am just pro Citizen.

    U.S. v. Minker, 350 US 179, at page 187
    "Because of what appears to be a lawful command on the surface, many citizens, because
    of their respect for what only appears to be a law, are cunningly coerced into waiving their
    rights, due to ignorance." (Paraphrased)

  20. #20
    Regular Member buster81's Avatar
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    sudden valley gunner wrote:
    buster81 wrote:
    floflo wrote:
    I can definitely see what you're saying about canadian healthcare. I live in Calgary, where it's very hard to find a family doctor. I always hear people talking about how the US has the worst healthcare, but it doesn't seem to be that bad... as long as you have health insurance. some employers pay for health insurance, is that right?

    They do. They pay for it in Canada too, just in a different way.
    It's not that bad even if you don't have insurance. I don't and had about $50,000.00 worth of work done on my foot last year after an accident. I don't know how I am going to pay it but that is worked out after the fact, here in the states. Even if all I can pay is $10.00 a month they can't do anything by law.

    Personally I'd rather have the freedom than have something forced down my throat for my "own good".

    Mike has some good articles on what can happen and probably will with our privacy and gun rights might be something worth reading.
    In Canada, the common belief is that if you don't have insurance, they let you die at the side of the road after an accident. I'm glad that didn't happen to you.

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