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Thread: 2nd verse

  1. #1
    Regular Member scratchkenny's Avatar
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    iI dont know if this is the right place to post this, my mom sent me this and i love it. Thought you all would like it.

    /http://www.coolestone.com/media/1337/Former_Marine_Stuns_Tea_Party_Crowd/

  2. #2
    Regular Member UtahRSO's Avatar
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    Actually, there are FOUR verses. The verse the gentleman sang is the last verse. The two middle verses are not commonly sung because they refer to the "foe's haughty host" (second verse), and "their foul footsteps' pollution" (third verse). Of course, these descriptions are demeaning to England, so they're not always polite to sing.

    On the other hand, those verses do fit the terrorists who fight against us today. So I don't mind singing all four.

    Google "Star Spangled Banner lyrics" to see the all the verses.

  3. #3
    Regular Member scratchkenny's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. Learn something new every day.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Dreamer's Avatar
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    Let us hope that the 2nd and 3rd stanzas never become appropriate in this nation. But if they DO, I fear they won't be directed toward England...

    The Star Spangled Banner

    

Oh, say! can you see by the dawn's early light 

    What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming; 

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, 

    O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? 

    And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, 

    Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there: 

    Oh, say! does that star-spangled banner yet wave 

    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? 



    On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
    
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, 

    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, 

    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
    
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, 

    In fully glory reflected now shines in the stream: 

    'Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh, long may it wave
    
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave! 



    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion
    
A home and a country should leave us no more?
    
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution! 

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave 

    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave: 

    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave 

    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    

Oh, thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand 

    Between their loved home and the war's desolation! 

    Blest with victory and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land 

    Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation! 

    Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
    
And this be our motto: "In God is our trust": 

    And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave 

    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. 



    It is our cause to dispel the foggy thinking which avoids hard decisions in the delusion that a world of conflict will somehow mysteriously resolve itself into a world of harmony, if we just don't rock the boat or irritate the forces of aggressionand this is hogwash."
    --Barry Goldwater, 1964

  5. #5
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    Dreamer wrote:
    Let us hope that the 2nd and 3rd stanzas never become appropriate in this nation. But if they DO, I fear they won't be directed toward England...

    The Star Spangled Banner

    

Oh, say! can you see by the dawn's early light 

    What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming; 

    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, 

    O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? 

    And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air, 

    Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there: 

    Oh, say! does that star-spangled banner yet wave 

    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? 



    On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
    
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, 

    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, 

    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
    
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, 

    In fully glory reflected now shines in the stream: 

    'Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh, long may it wave
    
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave! 



    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion
    
A home and a country should leave us no more?
    
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution! 

    No refuge could save the hireling and slave 

    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave: 

    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave 

    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

    

Oh, thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand 

    Between their loved home and the war's desolation! 

    Blest with victory and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land 

    Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation! 

    Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
    
And this be our motto: "In God is our trust": 

    And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave 

    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. 


    I had to memorize all four verses in Civics class in grade 10 and again my freshman year of college. Both times we could not miss a word of the first verse and if we missed more than three, I believe, then we failed.
    Don't confuse me with the facts, I have my emotions!

    I guess that's the difference between no crime and "stopping" a crime in progress. I prefer no crime.

  6. #6
    Regular Member rodbender's Avatar
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    The Star-Spangled Banner
    —Francis Scott Key, 1814

    O say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
    What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
    O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?


    On the shore dimly seen thro' the mists of the deep,
    Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
    Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
    In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream:
    'Tis the star-spangled banner: O, long may it wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!


    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
    A home and a country should leave us no more?
    Their blood has wash'd out their foul footsteps' pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave:
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.


    O thus be it ever when free-men shall stand
    Between their lov'd home and the war's desolation;
    Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land
    Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserv'd us a nation!
    Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
    And this be our motto: “In God is our trust!”
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

    On Sept. 13, 1814,Francis Scott Keyvisited the British fleet in Chesapeake Bay to secure the release of Dr. William Beanes, who had been captured after the burning of Washington, DC. The release was secured, but Key was detained on ship overnight during the shelling of Fort McHenry, one of the forts defending Baltimore. In the morning, he was so delighted to see the American flag still flying over the fort that he began a poem to commemorate the occasion. First published under the title “Defense of Fort M'Henry,” the poem soon attained wide popularity as sung to the tune “To Anacreon in Heaven.” The origin of this tune is obscure, but it may have been written by John Stafford Smith, a British composer born in 1750. “The Star-Spangled Banner” was officially made the national anthem by Congress in 1931, although it already had been adopted as such by the army and the navy.
    The thing about common sense is....it ain't too common.
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