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Thread: Lawmaker wants to require schools to teach gun safety

  1. #1
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    http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=11297742

    Anyone know more about this? I'd love to lend my support in some way as this sounds like a great idea.

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    Regular Member thx997303's Avatar
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    As I posted over on UCC, I cannot support such legislation.

    It will be far too easy for a parent to pawn the education off on the schools.

    As well, making training mandatory leads to the training being less effective.

    However, it would be a good thing if non gun owner's children were trained in gun safety.

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    Regular Member Kingfish's Avatar
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    I would not support it for the same reason I would not support teaching religion in school...You have no controll over the curiculum or who is teaching. Remember, the Brady Bunch is a "gun safety" orginization.

    But I don't agree with government schools to start with so don't listen to me.

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    leeland wrote:
    http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=11297742

    Anyone know more about this? I'd love to lend my support in some way as this sounds like a great idea.
    You know on the surface it sounds like a good idea, that there is sound thinking...

    On the other hand, shouldn't gun safety be handled at home, like sex education?

    I could see the dark side of this; OK children, how many here have parents that own firearms? Ever find a gun?

    Schools are already becoming too invasive in our childrens lives.

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    Trekker wrote:
    leeland wrote:
    http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=11297742

    Anyone know more about this? I'd love to lend my support in some way as this sounds like a great idea.
    You know on the surface it sounds like a good idea, that there is sound thinking...

    On the other hand, shouldn't gun safety be handled at home, like sex education?

    I could see the dark side of this; OK children, how many here have parents that own firearms? Ever find a gun?

    Schools are already becoming too invasive in our childrens lives.
    And the "safe handling" rules are similar.

    Treat it as if it were loaded.

    Never point it at something you do not intend to put a hole in.

    I better stop there...... :P

    "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

  6. #6
    State Researcher Kevin Jensen's Avatar
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    I too believe it is a bad idea to mandate safety. After all, we all know what Doug Huffman says about safety, right? :P

    Utah law already allows for the teaching of firearm safety in school, but does not require schools to teach it.

    However, the school board can choose to make it required if they want.

    53A-13-106. Instruction in firearm safety -- Purpose -- School districts to implement volunteer education classes -- Parental consent exception.
    (1) (a) School districts may permit the use of district approved volunteers or school district teachers for instruction of firearm safety education classes for students.
    (b) The volunteers or school district teachers instructing the firearm safety education class are encouraged to utilize donated materials prepared by firearms training and education organizations or to develop their own materials within existing budgets.
    (2) The purpose of firearm safety education is to:
    (a) develop the knowledge, habits, skills, and attitudes necessary for the safe handling of firearms; and
    (b) help students avoid firearm injuries.
    (3) School districts may offer firearm safety instruction to students in grades kindergarten through four to teach them that in order to avoid injury when they find a firearm they should:
    (a) not touch it;
    (b) tell an adult about finding the firearm and its location; and
    (c) be able to share the instruction provided in Subsections (3)(a) and (b) with any other minors who are with them when they find a firearm.
    (4) As used in this chapter, "firearm" means any firearm as defined in Section 76-10-501.
    (5) The State Board of Education shall make rules promulgated pursuant to Title 63G, Chapter 3, Utah Administrative Rulemaking Act, for:
    (a) use of certified volunteers for instruction of firearm safety education classes in the public schools;
    (b) use of public school classrooms or auditoriums for these classes;
    (c) school district review of donated materials before their use; and
    (d) proof of certification as a firearm safety instructor.
    (6) (a) A local school board may require every student in grades kindergarten through six to participate in a firearm safety education class offered within the public schools under this section.
    (b) A student may be exempted from participation upon notification to the local school by the student's parent or legal guardian that the parent or legal guardian wants the student exempted from the class in its entirety or any portion specified.
    (7) If a student is exempted under Subsection (6), the school may provide other activities during the period of time in which the student would otherwise be participating in the program.
    (8) The school districts may permit the Division of Wildlife Resources, local law enforcement agencies, peace officers as defined in Title 53, Chapter 13, Peace Officer Classifications, certified instructors, certified hunter education instructors, and other certified firearms safety instructors, as provided by rules adopted under Subsection (5)(a) to teach the firearm safety education class on a voluntary basis.
    (9) The school district is encouraged to maximize the use of existing firearm safety educational materials which are available at minimal or no cost and the use of certified volunteer instructors.
    (10) The school district may review the class on a regular basis for its effectiveness.
    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." Robert A. Heinlein

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    Someone once told me I was smart and I told them: "Nope, I just hang around with smart people and hope that some of it rubs off on me." That has sure been the case around this forum. Thanks for all the thoughtful comments.

    Of course I've always taught firearms safety within my home but I've frequently been shocked when my children's friends have come over and I've seen their complete ignorance of basic firearm safety. Anything that could provide widespread non-biased instruction of firearm safety would be welcome.

    I hadn't thought about a program like that being turned into an anti-firearm thing, but now that people mention that I can totally see it happening: "OK, pay attention students. Today we are going to learn about the evils of guns..."

    Maybe what I should be doing is working with my kids school to get the NRA Eddie Eagle program running there.

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    Regular Member LovesHisXD45's Avatar
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    That's one of the things I miss about living in Tooele. The schools out there already use the Eddie Eagle program. As for the gun safety training in my house, it is once a month every month on a regular basis. All three of my kids review the safety rules and handle my firearms with my supervision. The curiosity factor for them is zero now.

    I'm not for extensive training in the school system. I am, however, supportive of the most basic and fundamental concepts of how a child should respond if they encounter a firearm on school grounds or in a private residence absent an adult. Anything beyond that is a foot in the door for future abuse by left-wingers in my opinion.

    Kevin

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