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Thread: open carry in MD?

  1. #1
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    open carry in MD?

    Is there anything in the laws that would prohibit the open carry of an antique firearm? I haven't been able to find anything.

  2. #2
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    No, but there may be local laws, however there is some question about implied preemption by the state which may make them moot.

    There is no general law about open carry of long guns either.

    I am not a lawyer.

  3. #3
    Regular Member Sig229's Avatar
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    When you say "antique" firearm, are you talking about a black powder type or one that takes a regular cartridge?
    Believe it or not, I think it makes a difference in the communist state of Maryland.
    "Let your gun be your constant companion during your walks" ~Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
    Regular Member virginiatuck's Avatar
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    "Put your trust in God, my boys, and keep your powder dry." - Oliver Cromwell

    Knowing the sentiment that the Maryland government and police have against firearms in the possession of citizens who are not lawfully hunting, regardless of what the law says you can count on such a case being handled just as though it were illegal.

    The carrying of an antique firearm, as defined in 񘂌01 does not appear to be prohibited by Criminal Law Article 񘂌03. However, Criminal Law Article 񘂋01 might prohibit concealed carry of an antique firearm. Read it for yourself and decide; it's not very clear.

    Localities may regulate:

    • the purchase, sale, transfer, ownership, possession and transportation of such firearms and ammunition with respect to minors; law enforcement officials of the local government; and activities in or within 100 yards of "a park, church, school, public building, and other place of public assembly."
    • the discharge of firearms, except at "established ranges."
    • the sale of trigger locks with handguns.

    There are also state laws prohibiting firearms in places such as public schools and demonstrations.

    Sources:
    http://www.lcav.org/states/maryland.asp
    http://www.nraila.org/statelawpdfs/MDSL.pdf
    http://mlis.state.md.us/asp/web_stat....asp?gcr&4-201
    http://mlis.state.md.us/asp/web_stat....asp?gcr&4-203
    http://mlis.state.md.us/asp/web_stat....asp?gcr&4-101

  5. #5
    Regular Member virginiatuck's Avatar
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    I've been doing some research into antique revolvers. I've never owned nor carried one, nor even fired one before. I started out thinking that it wouldn't be easy to do; and nothing has convinced me otherwise yet.

    So far, I figure one would look for a cap & ball revolver with the following characteristics:

    1. a model well-known for its reliability
    2. a ramming lever, to allow faster loading
    3. a removable cylinder (to allow faster unloading and reloading)

    Actually, not just one, but carrying two would be preferred due to the unreliable nature of these firearms and their long reload time, compared to modern cartridge firing models.

    From what I can tell, Colt did not manufacture a cap & ball revolver with an easily detachable cylinder; Remington did. Or did Colt have one, too?

    How long can you expect a load to last before you have to reload the cylinders with dry powder? I guess it varies depending on your environment. How about in a modern urban/suburban environment in this area?

    On the History Channel, I remember seeing an account that Wild Bill Hickok had a daily routine of cleaning and loading his two Navy Revolvers to ensure their reliability. The only way I can figure you unload it is by firing it. Is that correct? I'm sure there are ways to extract the loaded ball and powder, but that doesn't seem very safe.

    Also, are there any statistics on accidental discharges/mechanical failures for these firearms?

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